Cordless Drill Voltage Why so many?

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What is the adavantage of the 18 or 19.2 volt drill over the 14.4 or 12 volt? If I am going to build a deck, which one should I get?
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The biggest you can afford. And look at the impact driver Makita has out. Folks have been praising it bigtime!! For a deck only, I would opt for the Makita. I like Milwaukee myself.
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yup, the Makita impact driver is fab! I've got 3 Makitas, and I reach for the compact, high torque impact first
dave
Ramsey wrote:

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For heavy duty work - like driving screws - I like a corded 3/8 or 1/2` drill and an extenstion cord of at least "12 gage", (I have a fifty foot '10') pluged into a 20 amp circuit. Guy accross the street tried doing some heavy work and couldn't understand why the plug on his '18 gage' melted after 15 min.
Tom
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Why the 120 volt corded drill? Much more power than any battery operated drill and much cheaper.

Longer run times between recharges of the battery packs. Marginaly more power.

If you are going to build a deck, get a "CORDED" drill and add a dry wall adapter to limit screw travel. Or for about $100. you can get a corded dry wall screw gun and have that feature built in. IMHO the corded models get heavy after several hundred screws and the bigger the battery pack, the heavier it is. Corded drills are relative light weight and very strong compared to a 18 or 19.2 volt mode.
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No, it is not "marginally more power", it is DRASTICALLY more power. I have owned 9.6v DeWalt, 16.8v Craftsman, 19.something Craftsman, and our tool crib has 24v Dewalt. The power goes up markedly with each voltage increase. And I am talking about driving #14 screws into mahaogany, maybe a few dozen at a time. Into poplar, pine or soft lam beam I can slam them in with no pilot holes at all if the motor is strong, which saves a bunch of time. Buy the big one. Any brand, most are Chinese anyway.
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MARGINAL compared to the jump from 9.6 to 24 volt to 120 volt corded. Much closer to 9.6 than 120.

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Of my three cordless drills, a Dewalt, a Porter Cable and Metabo, the only one that stands up to repetetive work is the Metabo 15.4. It is not the size of the battery, it is how the drill is geared. A 450 hp Kenworth can tow in excess of 100,000 pounds, could you do that with a 750 hp race car? But if the truth be known, I agree with Leon, for a deck I would use a corded 120v drill. Why would you lay a beating on a cordless drill when you are that close to a power source.
Blair
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FWIW ... anyone interested in getting a below par cordless tool battery "rebuilt" and operating better than when it was new, definitely give Primecell a try:
http://www.primecell.com /
I just sent them my second DeWally 18v. The first one I sent them came back with noticeably more power, and a _much_ longer life before re-charging.
It will end up costing the retail price of one battery to upgrade two ... well worth the $$, IMO.
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Whoaaa.... I just noticed that the DeWalt 9.6 impact driver puts out 900 inch pounds.... You probably paid too much... for that 12 volt model.. LOL

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I bought my last DeWalt drill a few years back. Had to return it the same day I bought it. The chuck wasn't true. Got the Makita, and now I've got 3. love 'em.
dave
Leon wrote:

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How do you drill with that impact Makita of yours..
I have had a similar problem with Bosch drills... Starting in 1986 I broke 3 all in the first day I used them... Oddly a Bosch rep got me to try one and it broke when I used it at a WW show... All of them had a problem in the gears. I started with a Panasonic and those are superb. Still using 2, 9.6 DeWalts and a Makita right angle cordless. The battery is about pooped on the Makita, it does not hold a charge very long, but it is about 20 years old.. ;~) I got the extra DeWalt because it was cheaper to buy in a kit than to buy 2 new batteries. Still using the original DeWalt cordless that is 7 years old.

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It's primary function in my shop is screwing; not drilling. However, with the hex bits, you CAN drill with it too. I'm not going to invest in MORE bits, just so I can say I use it for drilling too!
dave
Leon wrote:

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OK thanks... that was what I thought.

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don't believe everything dewalt says. they also claim a 15 amp motor is 4hp.
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.....;~)
Where yuh been hiding?
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On Mon, 01 Sep 2003 15:53:03 GMT, Steve Knight

They didn't say what planet they rated it on.
Barry
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http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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I would agree with this poster. A corded drill will have much more power for longer than a cordless drill, assuming a reasonable extension cord. The cordless drills (I have four) are best when a cord would get in the way, or is not available. MOstly, when looking at the larger battery voltages, weight is a major factor. I use 9.6v or 12v cordless for overhead or other 'raised' elevations, because of the weight. For a deck, where you will mostly be working downwards, the corded drill is a fraction of the cost and a better solution.
Also, in general, the larger battery size will give you more screw driving time before the battery needs a recharge. If you are going to drive a dozen or so screws, the smaller battery sizes will work fine. And the opposite for driving a lot of screws. The number of screws that could be driven on a single battery charge used to be a major criteria in the Fine Woodworking tests.
Also, for a deck. consider the new auto-feeding screw systems. You can buy a complete system (drill and feeder), or just the feeder. When I expand my deck next spring, I'll probably get a feeder to put on my corded DeWalt. There is even a lo-o-ong model for standup work. I haven't tried one yet, myself.
Retireb

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For a deck I would think that the charging time would be as important as the battery voltage and capacity. You're going to be going through batteries every 30-60 mins, so you'd need a model with a quick charger. Or save a lot of $$ and just get a corded drill. You're already going to be out there for a while so a lot of the benefits of the cordless (quick setup) aren't really valid. Plus you'd probably save more time with the corded drill due the its more powerful motor. -Matt
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