Cordless Drill - How I Decided

7 years ago, I bought a Ryobi 18-volt kit with drill, saw, and flashlight. The
circular saw isn't that hot because the battery runs down too fast but does have its uses if you plan well, the flashlight is long gone, but the drill is still working. The switch cuts out from time to time and the charge doesn't seem to last as long, and one of the batteries split open after falling from a 6' ladder, but it's a strong, reliable tool that's been put through hell. So when I saw the drill at Home Depot for a hundred dollars, with insidious flashlight and two batteries, I got another one. I can't imagine a Panasonic, DeWalt, or other two-and- a-half times as expensive tool doing any better. It's just my experience. Maybe you would have to exchange two or three Ryobi drills before getting one that works, and have a DeWalt that's been around for 10 years, but the Ryobi experience has been satisfying for me, considering the price.
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On 19 Oct 2004 12:17:16 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (BUB 209) wrote:

I too am conscience about the price. After my cordless Ryobi died 10 years ago, I bought a corded drill--never ending power, no batteries to mess with, rugged, and under $150 for top quality. I needed the drill in my backyard one day, so I bought a 50-foot heavy-duty extension cord.
Just yesterday I saw a city worker abusing a cordless DeWalt drill. He was using it to mix a 5-gallon bucket of concrete mix !
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(BUB 209) wrote:

I keep a PC 14.4 and two Ryobis in the shop (one of which only tension/detensions the bandsaw and adjusts the PRL height). The 18v Dewalt is ALWAYS in the truck for drilling/screws/augerbits/holesaws/lagbolts/lugnuts/mixing paint or drywall compound/you name its! The Ryobis are nice at the price but not trustworthy IMO.
The PC is/was trustworthy for near 10 years, but the batteries won't fit the Dewalt Sawzall, so it gets to stay home now.
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How is that abuse?
I use cordless drills to mix paint and driveway sealer on a regular basis. Mixing involves turning a shaft, so does drilling.
Barry
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Snip

You see the difference expecially if you make a living with the drill. The more expensice Panasonic is comfortable to use for hours on end. My dad has a Ryobi that I bought for him a few years ago and after using it, a Panasonic, and a DeWalt, I see the difference.
Does your drill have an electronic brake?
It's just my experience.

If you are satisfied, it is a good deal for you. No need to spend more money if you are satisfied.
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On 19 Oct 2004 12:17:16 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (BUB 209) wrote:

I have a couple of Ryobi tools that I'm satisfied with. Since their my tools for me - it's only my opinion that counts in the end.
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If it works for you, I'm happy.
I just dumped my 18 month old Ryobi for a Panasonic. Why? The Ryobi was good for the first year, then the batteries did not last as long. The switch went and cost $26 to replace. The batteries are now about shot. They won't hold a charge overnight.
OK, new batteries can be bought for the cost of a new drill so that seemed silly. I did a comparison. With the Ryobi 14.4 volt, I can hold the chuck and pull the trigger. It wont turn against my grip. The Panasonic will as it has more torque
I pull on the trigger of the Ryobi and it turns about half speed and they abruptly increase (this is the new switch also). The Panasonic goes very slow and is easier to control and accelerates smoothly as I put pressure on the trigger.
Either one can drill a hole but it is easier to use the new more expensive drill to me. It also has a better feel in my hand. You have to decide for yourself.
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Valid point - I can always tell I've been using the drill a lot because of the callus that builds up on the back of the first thumb joint. So apparently with an expensive tool you're paying for extensive ergonomics testing?
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On 20 Oct 2004 12:02:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (BUB 209) wrote:

If you're going to be using the thing all day, it had better be well designed, that's for sure. With a cordless, I imagine you're also paying for battery technology research.
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I bought a Makita and love it. The thing has been to hell and back and still hasn't died.
Fraser
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That's great that you're satisfied with a Ryobi, because you're saving some money. I just get a lot of enjoyment out of using my 12V Porter Cable. I've had it two years, it gets used almost daily, and performs as new. It will last for half a day of screwing up fence rails without a battery change, and charges only take 45 minutes, so there's no problem with it keeping up with two batteries. It even kept up on a decking job for a Habitat for Humanity home. Plus, I don't have all the extra weight of a higher voltage battery.
It's a wonderful tool.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (BUB 209) wrote in message

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