Cooling down an uninsulated shop.

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Leon says...

I'm thinking a radiant barrier would help a lot. Actually, just about any barrier would probably help. I asked about radiant barrier paint today at a box store and the paint guru said they had glow in the dark paint and fluorescent colors. I said nothing and walked away with a permanent loss of an IQ point. I saw I could get 1000 sq ft of radiant barrier online for $100 and $40 shipping, but installing it would be an interesting challenge. That's probably the way to go for the long run though.
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Does anyone have any actual experience with the radiant barrier paints? Are they as effective as aluminum barriers assuming both are applied against the roof decking?
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Mike in Arkansas wrote:

I had our builder install radiant barrier paint. They applied it on the underside (visible from the attic) of the roof decking. I'm also in Texas (Dallas area) where the temps are currently getting to the high 90's. I honestly don't know if the paint helps, because I have nothing to compare it to. My cooling bills are still very high, but who knows how high they'd be without the paint. We also did the blown cellulose insulation, which certainly looks like it would be more effective than the standard stuff. That attic still gets very hot so I'm thinking that the paint is not that great, or there was a problem with the way it was applied.
I have the same problem as the OP in my gara..shop. It's a three car garage with the metal doors facing west and it gets downright toasty in the late afternoon. I just added panels of of exterior sheathing (foil on one side, R5 value)and I really don't think it helped much. I'm now comtemplating an exhaust (or intake) fan arrangement of some sort. I have a side door which is currently unused and blocked by equipment, but I could utilize it for a fan. The door is near my shop area and I'm thinking I could set up a heavy duty box fan to pull in fresh air through an AC filter and crack one of the garage doors to allow the air to escape. That way I'd be pulling slightly cooler air from the east and exhausing it to the hot west side.
I could also install a window AC unit in that door, but I think the cost to operate it would be astronomical.
Tom
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I have heard that tests indicate that the paints if thoroughly applied with no missed spots is about 75% as effective as the decking.
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I believe the radiant paint is a Sherwin Williams product. And, I believe it is available as an interior wall paint, in colors for those rooms that catch a lot of sun on their exterior walls. I've heard it opined that if you are not going to condition the space then insulation is not the way to go. But, maybe that's just for high humidity locales like Houston. I'm also not a fan of blown-in cellulose insulation. I'd be afraid it will break down as the years go by, make dust. Not to mention the chemicals it's likely treated with.
--
"New Wave" Dave In Houston



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D. J. MCBRIDE says...

Thanks. I'll look at Sherwin Williams products.
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Exactly. Inslulation does not warm or cool. It slimply slows down the transfer of heat to a cooler spot. If you are not keeping the inside a constant temperature there is really no reason to insulate. The reaiant barrier however keeps the structure from absorbing heat.

I think the new stuff will work better. The old kind would settle and do like you said. The new cellulose however has an additive that sorta lightly glues it in place so that there is no settling. Ryland homes is using it and the can demonstrate how well it works at the model home sales offices. It really beats the pants off of the pink stuff for efficiency and sound control.
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On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 10:21:13 -0500, Hax Planx

here in n.c. it gets pretty hot in the summer months. do you have vents at each end of the building? if so, you could put a large fan blowing out at one end. my shop is uninsulated also exept for the foam sheating under the siding. nothing in the roof. it is under a few shade trees and 2 story so i am sure that is helping. my shop stayes cool up till around 4 pm in the summer. after then i go to the house. if you dont insulate then ventilation and air flow are the key to keeping cool. on days i want to work in the late afternoon i set a fan blowing in downstairs and one or two blowing out upstairs. seems to work ok. i have a window a c unit that suposedly works. havent ever pluged it in so i cant say weather it does or not. you are welcome to it if ya want to haul it home. maybe it willl make it cooler to work in there but might be kind o exspensive. lol.
skeez
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skeezics says...

I can only imagine what I would pay for AC out there. No vents and they would be difficult to install.
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On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 18:18:34 -0500, Hax Planx

its a window unit. missing the inside grill but in a shop it wont matter. i was going to cut a hole in the wall for it but my shop seems to stay cool enough.
skeez
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Hax Planx wrote:

I'd start with a gable mounted vent fan.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
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How about actively removing the heat: a gable-mounted exhaust fan, with or without a thermostat control. Depending on the CFM, you'll need a certain area of "inlet" into your shop of fresh air - got a screened window?
The collateral benefit to the exhaust fan is it moves out the fine dust too.
-Chris
Hax Planx wrote:

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TheNewGuy says...

A gable fan and vent system would be nice, but it is a cinder block building and the cinder blocks go all the way to the crown. Would a fan really cut down much on the radiant heat?
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On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 18:15:34 -0500, Hax Planx

It dropped the temperature in my old shop from scorching hot to whatever temperature it was outside in a matter of minutes, and it sounds like you have exactly the same situation in yours. IIRC, they had some vent fans that mounted directly to the inside of the roof right next to the ones mounted on the wall at the hardware store, so that may be easier.
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Prometheus says...

If they are in the roof, what about rain? Or maybe you are talking about a hooded vent?
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On Wed, 29 Jun 2005 07:55:51 -0500, Hax Planx

IIRC, (and it was a couple of years ago) they were hooded. I believe there were some louvered vents as well, but I don't know if I'd trust those in a roof, especially after they've been in there for a couple of years.
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What about a swamp cooler?
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wrote:

I cobbled a swamp cooler together to use in my garage here in the Dallas area. Box fan with a mister in front of it, water feed from a 2 gal jug. Not fancy but it helps. As outside humidity rises, it becomes much less effective, but below 40% relative humidity it drops the temp about 15 degress if ambient temp outside is >85 degrees F. It does, obviously, raise the humidity in the garage a bit.
Regards.
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Dhakala says...

For 1000 sq ft?
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Why not a swamp cooler for 1000 sq. ft.? Today, I saw a $350 unit at Home Depot rated for 800 feet. The $450 unit was rated for 1500 feet.
It's not for your square feet. It's for your comfort, right? :-)
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