Cool bit for Phillips screws

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On Wednesday, August 12, 2015 at 1:19:56 PM UTC-4, krw wrote:


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It has nothing to do with expense. It has to do with what they know and wha t they deal with. The vast majority of the families involved in the Derby a ren't involved in the types of activities where Torx vs. Robertson vs. Phil lips becomes a issue of which type of screws to use. By rule, they must use the supplied Phillips head screws in the construction of the Derby cars. W hile some of us are also serious DIYers (building our own decks, etc.) and/ or contractors, where the choice of screw matters, most families still live in the Phillips head world. When we say "Hey, Bob! Can you grab you screw gun and take that starting ramp apart?" it had better be put together with Phillips head or odds are Bob isn't going to be able to help.

ple, setting up tracks for Soap Box Derby races. We have to construct start ing ramps and safety rails. We have to secure 10 x 20 canopies to the black top, etc. For years I have wanted to switch to Torx or Star or Robertson, a nything but Phillips. Unfortunately, I can't do that.

is what is used for the Derby car shells. However, not many of them have To rx or Star or Robertson bits, so we are basically forced to use Phillips he ads for everything if we want everyone to help with the set-up and tear-dow n.

move a stripped Phillips screw from something because some rookie chunk-chu nk-chunked it in with a bit-up Phillips bit. Gawd, how I hate that sound.

e report to the Derby.

Too much variability in participants. Also, not my job. ;-)
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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

Geez, Home Depot, Harbor Freight, and everybody else sell the same 10 buck box of bits that fit just about everything. I'm sorry, but "don't have bits" is a crock. The only reason they have Phillips bit is that they bought them in a store.
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That was my thought too. Not so long ago, it took work to find a Torx or Robertson bit. Now, tho, the stores are full of bit assortments that include straight, phillips, 3 or 4 sizes of Torx, a couple of Robertons and half a dozen small hex sockets.
If you want to mess someone up now, you have to find screws with Bristol splines or 12-point splines. Or maybe the old "clutch-head" screws with the hour-glass shaped recess.
John
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On 8/12/2015 4:33 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Where were you looking? Now I will admit that I have a pretty long automotive back ground but I bought my first Torx screw driver in 1975. They were pretty plentiful at all the auto supply stores. I sis not look at Craftsman but that probably would have been my seconds guess back then.
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@swbelldotnet says...

My Swiss Army Knife that I've had for at least 20 years has Torx.
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Every box of Torx head screws I've purchased in the past decade came with a bit in the box.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 08/12/2015 02:04 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Same here. And there's bins full of several sizes of bits at the hardware store too. I've got bags full of Phillips screws that I'll never use because the Torx (and Roberston) are so much nicer.
There's getting to be less and less of a reason not to make the switch...
...Kevin
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Kevin Miller
Juneau, Alaska
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On Wednesday, August 12, 2015 at 6:54:32 PM UTC-4, Kevin Miller wrote:

Absolutely true. So if you decided it was time to orchestrate the switch fr om Phillips to Torx/Star/Robertson within an organization of ever changing volunteers, you'd show up on site with a box or two of the screws of your c hoice, meaning you'd have one or two bits that match the screws. You, and m aybe one other person, would then have the pleasure of doing all of the set up and tear down because the vast majority of the other volunteers would b e sitting around drinking coffee with their Phillips-bit-loaded screw guns by their side.
Granted, I'm talking about a specific organization where Phillips screws ar e mandated in the construction of the cars, therefore Phillips bits are wha t the vast majority of people bring to the race.
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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

drinking coffee with their Phillips-bit-loaded screw guns by their side.
How about you show up with a pack of bits as well?

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Usual home handyman sort of places - Home Depot, Ace, Sears. They were considered "specialty tools", like circlip pliers. No surprise you could find them in an auto parts store, but that's not the first place someone other than an auto mechanic would have looked.
I'd guess they started showing up widely about 7-8 years ago. (which would be about the same time it became normal to find a driver bit in a box of screws).
John
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On 8/13/2015 8:05 AM, John McCoy wrote:

I'm sure it is all relative. I saw wide spread Torx in the 80's. You just had to realize what you were looking at in the assortment/array of screw drivers, sockets, and hex style wrenches.
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wrote:

I remember them from the '70s. It had to be before '75 because we had a '74 Rustang. The door striker was essentially a Torx-head bolt.
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On 8/13/2015 8:03 PM, krw wrote:

74? Wasn't that the Pintang? ;~) Funny how Ford and GM started upper end vehicles based on their entry level vehicles. Pinto/Mustang II...... Vega/Monza/Starfire/Skylark, IIRC.
That is entirely possible/likely. IIRC GM adopted the Torx in 1975. Seat belt bolts were also some heavy duty applications of the Torx screw. And for what that is worth, they may have been around earlier than 1975 for GM however not for replacing the Phillips style screw. the big deal back then was the better screw to replace the applications that used Phillips screws.
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wrote:

That's the one. Little POS. ;-)

Not sure I understand you point, "started upper end vehicles"?

I thought the original reason for the Torx head was robotic insertion. It was easier for the tool to hold the fastener.
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On 8/14/2015 11:36 AM, krw wrote:

More expensive vehicles based on the entry level. I had both a Chevy Vega and an Olds Starfire. The Starfire looked different from the Vega and had one hell of a more reliable V6 engine but looked different in many respects, but handles, knobs, steering wheel positions, pillars, pedals were all exactly in the same place.

That could be true, either way the Torx was/are better and easier to use than the Phillips head screws regardless of the user, robot or man.
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Early 70's is when GM really started "platform" engineering, building many models which only differed in small ways on the same basic car. It reached it's peak in the following generation, when the same platform was used for everything from the Chevy Cavalier to the Cadillac Cimarron.
Apropos of engines, some of the Vega derived models had either 305 or 350 small-blocks wedged in them, somehow. In that era I think it was a rule at GM that everything got a small-block V8 engine.
John
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On 8/14/2015 1:49 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Few within the same brand were similar almost all had a cousin between divisions.

It was a 262cid small block with 110 hp. Although California had different engines. Some of the spark plugs had to be replaced through a cut out opening in the wheel well.

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Somebody wrote:

---------------------------------------------------------------- The age of true junk.
Took a bankruptcy to clean things up at GM.
FoMoCo brought in somebody from the outside.
There was no hope for Chrysler.
Lew
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On 8/14/2015 3:35 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I assure you things at GM are not cleaned up.
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wrote:

He's right about Chrysler, though. Well, except for misspelling "is".
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