Converting my garage into a workshop

I am oplannign on converting my garage into a workshop and am looking for some suggestions on anything from the best way to build a workbench to the most effective setup. Any websites or pictures would be great.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Put all large equipment on mobile bases. That's RULE number one.
Put in lots of outlets, about 49 inches above the floor, or higher. Don't forget a couple of 220V outlets for the bigger equipment like a cabinet saw and DC.
Plenty of lights, and white walls.
The type of WW'ing you plan on doing dictates to a large extent the type and size of workbench. you haven't told us much, yet.
Pick up some books on the subject to see pictures of existing shop layouts to get some ideas. Take a look at Wood magazine, Fine Woodworking, Workbench, to name a few.
If you give more info, you'll get more definitive help here, Ryan.
dave
Ryan Morin wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My shop used to be a garage ... a small one. If you're so inclined, you can see what a small, ex-garage shop looks like by clicking on the link below. Did I mention it's too damn small?
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 9/21/03
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My two car garage is too small, too! I'd be happy with a shop about 40 x 50, judging from the auto shop I leased that was 50 x 50. That would give me plenty of room for materials storage, a finishing room, and plenty of "elbow" room around the various equipment. I could retire the mobile bases, perhaps!
oh, and room for a sink with hot/cold water; a toilet... (I can dream, can't I???)
dave
Swingman wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I noticed the anti fatigue mats on the floor good idea

can
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yeah, they are leg savers. Bought the kind that comes in rolls from Lowes a couple of years ago. They're cheaper and do the job.
Did you see today's "lunch in the shop" segment?
Project Page 3, last project.
Sorry *ss mothers .... can't even buy a decent burger anymore, everything is becoming a rip-off (and in some other language besides English) these days.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/18/03
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ryan Morin wrote:

How large a garage? Will it have to share space with automobiles?
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well here is some more information about the space. It is apprx. 16 x 20 feet, single car 50 YO garage. It will not be sharing with anything. I am just getting started in woodworking and want to build things for around the house. and move on from there.
Currenlty the space in uninsulated but i am planning to insulate in the new year. My friend who is an electrician is going to be coming down to do the electrical work for me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No doubt he'll wire lights on different circuit than tools. I'd miss the sink we have!
On 19 Dec 2003 05:44:17 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Ryan Morin) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you can,insulate then add OSB or plywood($$$$) on the walls,painted white. Run electrical in conduit. I did his for my basement shop, though I laid 5/8 drywall horizontally( cheaper than ply !!). I used 1by6 to cover the horizontal joints and to mount the conduit and boxes( every 5 feet,doubles), can't have enought outlets ! Also wire the lights up as at least 2 separate banks and never have an outlet on either of them. That way if a machine trips a breaker the lights DON'T go out ! If possible 'add a room' outside to house a dustcollector and or air compressor,amazing how much space THEY can take up. hope this helps jay
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The following might give you some ideas with regard to electrical requirements for a serious small garage woodshop. With the below I never have to hunt for a plug or trip breakers, and the sub panel is nowhere near full. Each of the 120V/20A GFCI protected branch wall circuits has at least two receptacles 6' apart.
For lighting, I installed 4 fourplex receptacles in the ceiling joists and use 8, four foot flourescent fixtures with plugs on the end, suspended from 2 X 4's on the rafters so that they can be moved easily if/when machinery is moved.
If you put in a sub-panel, which you should if you're serious, check out the cost of the breakers for that model.make panel before you make a decision as to make ... there can be a big difference in breaker cost, particularly when you step up in amperage.
Since you are in a garage, you may find your local codes requires GFCI protection on non-dedicated circuits ... do so ... and make sure you get your wiring permitted and inspected ... you don't want to jeopardize your home owners insurance in the event of a mishap.

# Location/Description
0 West Wall 220V/20A Dedicated Table Saw 1 West Wall 120V/20A GFCI protected 2 North Wall Bench 120V/20A GFCI protected 3 East Wall Bench 120V/20A GFCI protected 4 Ceiling Lights 120V/15A Dedicated Lights - Dual SW 5 East Wall Center 120V/20A GFCI protected 6 East Wall 220V/40A Dedicated Dust Collection 7 West Wall 120V/20A Dedicated - Burglar Alarm
Sub-Panel Circuit Breaker - 100A 24/12 with 60A MBrkr
Brkr# - Circuit Description
1a 1 West Wall 1b 2 North Wall + Bench 2a/b 4 Lights 3a 5 East Wall Center 4a 3 East Wall Bench 4b/6a 0 West Wall - Table Saw - 220/20A 6b West Wall - Burglar Alarm 7a/8b East Wall - Dust Collection - 220/40A
Hope this helps ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/18/03
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

Given the size, depending upon the tools you plan to get, you are going to need to be very efficient in your use of space. Make sure you put all you tools on wheels, look to every nook and cranny for storage space.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ask him to wire the lights on a different circuit than that used for the major equipment. that way when you pop a breaker, you won't be in darkness at a critical moment.
dave
Ryan Morin wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ryan,
ask your friend to install some pendant outlets over your benches. Having the cords suspended out of the way when working is very convenient.
Greg

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I did just this and had VERY little space to work with (about 1/4 of a 2 car garage).....I have pictures up and a brief explanation of how the shop was built here www.jdurango.com (click on SHOP PICS)
--
Jonny Durango

"Patrick was a saint. I ain't."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A few points
1- If you live in the frozen north, the first priority should be heat. Trust me on this one! Working in the cold sucks.
2- In general, many stationary tools can be fitted with mobile bases which makes it easy to rearrange them as you need. Especially handy if the space is to be shared with vehicles, etc.
3- Consider a dust collector at a minimum and ideally a dust collector and an air cleaner.
4- I painted my floor with epoxy paint from Home Depot. It looks nice and it is easy to clean.
5- White walls will go far towards making the shop well lit.
Good luck Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 13:24:51 GMT, "Frank Ketchum" [snip]

How's that paint been lasting for you. Is it easy to scratch dragging things across it? Was the paint the water based epoxy for floors? Been thinking of painting my shop floor also but saw a lot of bad results on others. Thanks
John, in Minnesota
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

John,
I think it was the water based. It was the behr one part epoxy system. I painted my basement floor with it 3 years ago and it has held up great. My shop floor got painted 2 years ago and it has also held up without incident.
Disclaimer!-- I don't drag heavy things across it, so I don't know how it will fare in that regard.
Last month I had a plumber jackhammer up some concrete in my basement and install a sewage pit for the eventual bathroom going there. I had to cleanup the resulting dirt and concrete with a shovel. My dad remarked at how there was virtually no scratches on the floor even after just shoveling the crap up into pails (we weren't trying to save the paint).
From what I understand, the results are determined 99.9% by the preparation. I washed the floor with the specialized wash. Then I etched the concrete with the etcher. Then washed again. Then put down 2 coats. I didn't put in any sand or traction flakes. I spent a lot of time getting everything just right because I didn't want the paint to fail. I am happy with the results but admittedly I don't abuse the floor as bad as some might.
It makes it a breeze to clean up and it keeps my basement dust free since the walls are also painted.
Frank in Michigan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 21:49:07 GMT, "Frank Ketchum"

Thanks for the info Frank. As usual prep is the major part of the job. Many years ago I spilled some thinned down poly on the basement floor. It held up extremely well. Been thinking of doing that for the shop. Any comments from Wreck readers on that idea?
John, in Minnesota
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.