Converting JWTS-10CW2 to 230V and circuit wiring..

I am converting my JWTS-10CW2 to 230V, and I have a question about the plug (I changed the wiring in the motor OK). Do people normally leave this as a normal 3-prong plug? That seems like a bad idea because when you run the power from the circuit box, it will look like a normal outlet and will fry any 120V devices plugged into it by mistake. I was thinking of changing it to a twist-lock 240V type.
Am I missing something? I've added several 120V circuits and just wanted to ask the question to see what others have done before running this 240V one.
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*CHANGE* IT. Doesn't have to be a twist-lock. There are 'standard' 240V plugs, too. it's got the two 'hot' blades in a straight line, with the ground contact below the mid-point. Like this: -.-
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No chance of a mistake because 240v and 120v stuff will not fit each other. You have to change the plug, and you have to change the outlet. Well, you do if you want to be either safe or legal...
http://www.networkcable.com/pages/components/nema_nonlocking.html
The illustrations aren't not quite right, as a 20a outlet will also accept a 15a plug.
The 240v stuff is expensive; I don't know if that if because it is made for higher voltages, because it is made in smaller quantities, or because Walmart doesn't carry it.
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I think he meant he was going to wire 220 right to a 110 outlet, then keep the same plug. Don't do it. It is not safe like you said, and I am sure not up to code. Thanks, Tony D.
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Thanks for the replies guys. I have an idea. I dont really like the idea of cutting the Jet plug in case I ever want to easily revert to 120V, so would it be ok to make an extension cord that had the normal 120V 3-prong recepticle on on end for the saw and a twist-lock 240V plug on the other for the wallplug (I already bought the twist lock plug, I like the locking feature)? This way I could extend the power cord another 7 feet or so and this would really help out my shop layout. The Jet cord is so short!
Would that be ok? I bought 10/2 wire for the 240 outlet I will wire up.
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Don't do it...either cut the plug off the cord and save it or pull the wire from the motor and install a new plug set. Otherwise, you'll STILL have a 110/120 volt plug that, in a hazy momoent, you or someone else, may try to plug into a 110/120 outlet and then the motor is NOT going to like that.
Let's think safety out there, People!
Mike
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Are you running 30 amp service for the 220? That's unusually high. It will work fine, but may not be necessary. I ran all 20 amp 220v circuits for my shop.
Bob

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"Easily revert to 110volt". None of its difficult, but its more hassle to have to rewire the motor head than to connect a 3 prong plug in my opinion. You would have to rewire the motor head anyway. I used a 220 plug that was especially well designed for connection - just strip back 1/4" on each wire, stick it in the right hole and tighten the screws.
Bob

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Yes, I'm going to run a 30 amp service. I wasnt sure wheat it would draw, so I figured 30 was overkill and safer. Plus, I had some 10/2 lying around. Is it legal to so 20 amp with 10/2 wire?
Rewiring the motor on the jet is really easy. They use a few spade connectors that you have to position differently on a small terminal strip. Changing the motor over to 220 took about 5 minutes.
But no one really said whether using that extension cord would be ok. Assuming I would be the only one using the saw(and would label the 3-prong plug as a 220) would the extension cord (3-prong on one end and twist-lock on the other) be a bad idea from a safety standpoint? It seems like the cleanest to me. I looked into rewiring the saw from the saw switch, but it looks like a pain to do.
Thanks for the replies so far!

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Yes as long as the terminals on the receptacles are listed for #10 wire.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) writes:

You should include at least the safety ground line. The neutral line is optional.
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snipped-for-privacy@r1150r.net (Subw00er) wrote in message

Of course. You can always use wire that's rated for a higher amperage on a lower amp circuit.
Except for the cost of the wire, I don't see any reason NOT to run 30 amp.
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NOOOOO! That violates code and good sense. Whack it off and put on a real 220volt plug. Avoide accidents. Twistlock is expensive and not really needed. I've converted all my stationary tools to 220 volt and put in 220v outlets every 3 feet. I couldn't make up my mind how to do the shop, so I created some flexibility in the electrical area.
Bob

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On 30 Dec 2003 22:45:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@r1150r.net (Subw00er) wrote:

In addition to your other wiring issues, take care that you redo the connections at the motor correctly when switching from 120 to 240V.
It's easy if you just follow the diagram on the motor housing, but it's also easy to get it wrong.
You will fry your motor if you do this wrong, and you won't get a second chance. Unfortunately, the motor will run, then you'll see smoke, and it's too late.
DAMHIKT
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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Yes, I contacted Jet just to make sure I wired it correctly. I ended up placing two wires in the center of the terminal block together.
I decided to be safe and went out and bought some 12/3 wire and a 220V plug and recepticle. I will cut the end of the Jet cord and wire up the 220 plug. Then I will put a 220V socket on the end of the wire I bought and the twist lock on the other side that goes to the wall recepticle I already bought. I got 15 feet of the 12/3, but I'm going to use as little as possible. The guy from Jet said that 20Ft should be a maximum length to use from the saw's switch.
Thanks again for helping me sort this out safely!
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