converting cordless drills to corded

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I've been thinking about doing this too since I have 4 cordless drills that wont hold a charge. My plan is to buy a cheap switching PC supply and attach it to my workbench and use the 12v supply to power the drill(s). These supplies can be picked up pretty cheap (a 500 watt supply on pricewatch.com is $13 delivered) and can handle 10+ amps on the 12 volt supply so I think it will handle it Ok. It won't be portable but all I really want is to be able to use these drills on my workbench (I have other corded and cordless drills for mobil usage). If I end up doing this, I'll let you know how it worked...
Lance
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I have one of those Makita 18v cordless sliding miter saws, and I thought about hooking a power supply to it somehow, but I'm not sure how much current the motor would pull. I don't use the saw very often, and I usually have to recharge the battery every time I break it out. I too would like to know if anybody has successfully done this, and what type of power supply they used.
Tom
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snipped-for-privacy@juno.com (Tom M.) wrote in

Now for this application what you need is a charger permantely wired to the battery. That way at a job site where there isn't power you can run it without plugging it in. Then when there is power the battery will charge some in between cuts. If after lots of cutting the batter is getting week then just go do something else for a while.
Now as for how to acomplish this. Open up the tool and add a small power plug like a headphone jack to the tool. Not the battery. Batteries do go bad. By modifying the tool you get to replace the battery when you need it. Then take an old battery of that will fit in your charger. Take it apart, remove the batteries and attach a cord with the correct plug on the end. This way you can use your existing charger.
The only mod to the tool is a small (3/16) hole. Then install connector and wire in parrallel with the battery connection. Use at least 18 guage wire to connect the connector to the battery contacts. Then use at least a 18 guage power cord attaching the modified battery to the plug. What you want is an 18 guage path from the charger through the cable to the tool. Otherwise the quick charger might not work. Quich chargers often generate over 1 amp of current and have to measure the voltage at the battery to tell if it is charged. You need really good connections so that the charger works properly.
Then lets say you are making a 10 second cut every couple of minutes. The battery should never get low.
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What a bunch of well though out baloney LOL :-)
Jon~
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