Convert a powr planer to a jointer

Having an electric power planer from Ryobi - which I understand is not a top grade model - but in trying to edge plane 2" thick boards for edge joining wondering if anyone has attempted to convert their electric planer such as this into a jointer. Anyone constructed a table with a fence to accomplish this - seems as though everything is there to make a jointer except for the table and fence. Seems odd that lots of router table designs but nothing along these lines. Or is there a better jig, method for edge planing with the hand tool.
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Funny you should mention that -- J T posted a link to one of those just a couple days ago. :-)
<shudder>

And some means of adjusting the height of the infeed side relative to the knives and outfeed side.

Honestly, this really isn't a very good idea. Among other things, the base of the tool is too short to really be useful for jointing. And the lack of adjustability of the infeed vs. outfeed pretty much kills it.
Do a Google Groups search -- how to joint without a jointer has been discussed here numerous times. Methods include jigs and sleds on a table saw, router tables, handheld routers with a jig or edge guide, and, of course, hand planing with a jointer plane.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Tue, Jun 12, 2007, 7:42pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (DougMiller) doth sayeth: Funny you should mention that -- J T posted a link to one of those just a couple days ago. :-) <shudder> <snip>
Ah yes. I would have been sooo proud if that had been me that came up with that idea. One of the side benefits would be that using one of those would definitely encourage one not to be careless - more than once. LOL.
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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Tue, Jun 12, 2007, 7:18pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net doth wonder: Having an electric power planer from Ryobi - which I understand is not a top grade model - but in trying to edge plane 2" thick boards for edge joining wondering if anyone has attempted to convert their electric planer such as this into a jointer. <snip>
Sure. No prob. I made a planer sled to hold the stock on edge, run it thru. Works great. Now I just need to finish the longer planer sled for longer stock.
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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Number 7 Stanley.

fence.
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wrote:

A jointer is a plaining device that has long tables for flatness, and a vertical fence for setting up a right angle. There's nothing magic about which way up it points. Turning a handheld planer upside down doesn't magically transform it into a jointer.
The "Captain Hook Jointer" is pointless and stupid. Not because it's hazardous (and it is), but because it involves doing work to make the housing for it, all to give you something that works less well than simply passing the tool over the workpiece in the way it's meant to be. It still has short tables, so it's not going to give you a usefully straight edge for glue joints.
If you're working big things, the easiest way to work them is probably to hold them firmly in place (Workmate time) and move a planing device (hand or electric) over their surface. It's easier than trying to carry something the size of a door over a fixed jointer, even if you already have a nice big jointer.
As CW suggested, a good #7 can still cost less than an indifferent electric planer and it has the accuracy to give you a good edge surface.
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Thanks - on second thought - a #7 hand plane sounds like the way an old fashioned craftsman might do it - and since each board does weigh over 50 pounds might be a lot easier than trying to brute force and keep the board vertical on a jointer.
Andy Dingley wrote:

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