Conv to 220?

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I have a Dewalt 746 table saw that can be converted to 220. In the kitchen above my workshop there is an outlet that was for the electric stove that used to be there (now gas). Two questions:
1. If the outlet is 40 amps, can a table saw that uses much less amps be run off of it?
Plug looks like: \ / |
2. Is it worth converting the saw to 220?
Thanks,
Dave
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very_dirty snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

1. Yes although the matching plug is somewhat of a pita on a smaller device there's nothing unsafe. Remember, the circuit protection is to protect the fixed wiring, not the device plugged into it.
Also, how are you going to get from the location in the kitchen to the shop? Would seem potentially simpler to run a 220 circuit in the shop where I would presume the distribution panel is in the basement, anyway.
2. I run everything I can on 220 just to cut down the higher amperage a 110 draws. The actual difference in efficiency is small...
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The kitchen is directly above the workshop and the outlet is mounted to a joist below the kitchen (of ceiling of the shop) directly above the table saw. There was a hole in the kitchen floor behind the stove where the stove plug was passed through. I used this hole to run the gas line through. I did this some time ago. I could never figure out why, with natural gas run to the house, the dryer and stover were electric (water heater was gas).
Dave
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<snip>

Electric dryers and stoves are cheaper than gas. Jim
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Cheaper to buy, yes, but usually more expensive to operate.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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The people who build the houses are more interested in the cost to buy rather than the cost to operate. As an aside, I have never owned an electric dryer because they cost more to operate. Jim
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Not if you have time-of-use electricity billing and use it during off-peak times...
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wrote:

But not everyone is able to schedule doing his laundry at 2:30am...
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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That must be why in the 3 years that I converted from an electric range to natural gas, that I paid for the new gas range range with the savings. It may be different in some areas, but here? Gas costs about 25% per BTU of that in electrical equivalent.
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Interesting. I was of the opinion that you were practically in the spray from Niagra Falls, and hence, massive hydorelectric facilities.
Next thing, you'll be telling me you have no igloos and sled dogs. ;-)
Patriarch
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very_dirty snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I'd then make a pigtail to plug into the existing outlet and make it long enough to reach a convenient location to plug in the saw on the other end with a 20A connector.
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I wouldn't. I would just pay an electrician to take the cover off the outlet plate, remove the outlet, then extend conduit to install a new box and outlet with the correct plug right next to the saw.
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That's the right way.
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woodworker88 wrote:

That would work, but doesn't need an electrician necessarily, either...
Primaryy reason I wouldn't bother is there is no reason to have the heavy wire required for the 40A circuit to go to a second box and it wouldn't be code to put extend less than a 40A outlet on that circuit as a fixed component. Of course, could go back and replace the 40A breaker w/ smaller, but that adds even more unnecessary expense...
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Duane,
Thanks for the response. So, by pigtail you mean us a male plug that matches the 40A outlet, connect a sufficient gauge wire, the connect a 240v 20A female at the other end?
Dave
wrote:

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David Bridgeman wrote:

Yep...I have no idea how big a load the saw is, but can't be >20 A @ 110V, so that's overkill for 220V. That needs 12 ga. I would <not> suggest anything other than a single-use extension, however.
If you have need/use for additional 220V outlets in the shop area, I'd either run a dedicated circuit or make the appropriate changes as others have noted to convert this to a dedicated "up-to-snuff" circuit--and, it would be better to have the separate shop circuit properly sized and leave the kitchen circuit as is in that case imo.
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Ummmm... why could it not be more than 20A @ 120V ?
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Actually, it was supposition that it would be highly unlikely...poor choice, probably to say "can't".
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On Wed, 25 May 2005 14:38:52 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

It probably isn't any bigger than, say 2 HP (since it's a convertible motor). Are there any convertible motors bigger than that? Are there any that big? That would definitely max out a 20A/120V circuit. I think that's what he was getting at. We already know it's a convertible motor and we can thus speculate with some authority from there, can't we?
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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LRod wrote:

That was basis of my conjecture, yes...what is largest convertible available I don't know.
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