Contact glue for veneering

Hi,
I'm about to make a bed, couple night stands and a drawers chest on SWMBO order who has her eye set on a lot of highly figured walnut I accidentally scored and has no access for more.
I have few 2 in. boards that are wide and long enough and will suffice for all of the above only if I slice them for veneer.
Although I have a very well equipped shop it is tiny (12ft by 8ft) I have all the tools mounted on racks on wheels to get by and really to not want to add or invest in veneering equipment.
My question is what are the cons for using contact glue and a heavy roller for veneering? are there other low-tech methods that i can use? Is vacuum press my only way to go?
Thanks, izak.
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Avoid using contact cement. The non-water based stuff is flammable and dangerous, plus very carcinogenic. The water based stuff would be good if it actually held.
Contact cement has the bad habit of actually leaching through veneer.
No question that vacuum pressing, or similar is the best way, but you can also do it the traditional way: hide glue and veneer hammering. When vacuum pressing, you don't need the whole large platen and all, you can rig your own vacuum pump, then go with I forget the name, but Vacupress.com sells it. It's a sleeve that fits over long skinny pieces, then you only need a couple of clamps. They also sell a small, not very expensive vacuum pump of their own.
I would stay with a glue like Unibond 800 over the Titebonds and such. Those have a tendency to creep; Unibond is a two part cement ideal for veneering.
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Hum - third time I've tried to respond to this. I guess adding attachments may have screwed it up.
Anyway, I made a repro davenport writing desk, with a front panel (below the desk) made of MDF which I wanted to veneer in the pattern of a celtic knot - with figured walnut as the background (and bits bewteen the lines) and lighter wood for the lines, with box wood defining the line edging. Anyway, I concluded the only way to do this was to use contact adhesive. I covered the whole of the veneer, but painted it on the bits I wanted it to sick on, on the MDF (haveing routed the thin lines for the box wood. This worked a tread, as I could cut along the slots accuratly, and the veneer with only one side glued did not stick.
I had been warned that using contact adhesive was not a good idea if you were to french polish it afterwards - which I had no intention of doing - as it can / will (not sure which) react and cause peeling. I also wondered about water, whether that might cause problems, but I never came across it.
Bottom line - it was easy and quick. DOn't use polish (not sure what aspect of french polish was supposed to be the cause of the problem though - I waxed and buffed it.
If anyone fancies a photo of the finished product - let me know
iandotnussbaum(((at)))blueyonderzzzdotcodotuk remove the z's, dot -> . (((at))) => @
PS. Brits do wood working too :-)

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Could be, since this isn't a binaries group. Most ISPs strip attachments from posts to non-binaries groups. Perhaps yours drops the entire post.
Post your pictures, drawings, or whatever on ABPW (alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking) and post text here alerting folks to the existence of images on ABPW.
Or post text here with a link to a web site with the images.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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Your post and pic came out ok to me. very nice looking desk cc

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