Considering a lathe....

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J T wrote:

Thanks JT for that suggestion. Another guy emailed me with similar advice, a spring-pole lathe. I know what they are like, for sure, and it will do the job. I'm a machine guy myself and love the power tools but a great suggestion nontheless.
I would ask them Indians about their toos but, gosh golly, they don't talk to me. When I said hello to some guys with what looked like heirloom tools they would not say a word to me. Some Indians probably resent seeing our white faces out in the same rice as them. I guess I would be pissed too if I was a Native American. I am rich and white so what do I care? A little reverse discrimination don't bother me too much.
However, I know that tribal leaders have said that they want the whites to harvest also. Ricing has been declining among young Natives and they welcome all who continue the traditional ways. It seems youg people are more interested in video games and hourly wages than they are hard labor for little wages. The act of ricing actually propagates the rice because a lot of grain falls into the water. It also encourages the wildlife, mainly birds, since they are not able to feed on the rice until it falls on the water. The DNR even buys unprocessed grain for the purpose of re-seeding damaged beds.
Ricing on the Indian Reservation is allowed only to those are members of the tribe and/or residents of the reservation. The best ricing is on these reservations so they have plenty of space to harvest without having to see my white face, is one way to look at it. We do our ricing outside the reservation boundary, obviously.
Lawrence
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I'll ditto that. I used to have a Craftsman Mono-tube lathe. It was pretty entry level, but you do not need more than a entry level lathe (but not a mini/midi with a short bed) to do what you want.
It's sort of like asking what type of copressor do I need to run a brad nailer... almost any will do.
I suspect that craftsman monotube lathes are one of the more common tools on the used market.
I still use the el-cheapo turning tools that I got with the C-man. I have since purchased better tools, but the cheapies perform remarkably well.
I am not usually a proponent of buying cheap. I sold my C-man for $100 and now enjoy using a far superior JET. But a C-man will exactly what you're asking.
-Steve
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lwhaley wrote:

The 14" means it can turn a piece 14" in diameter over the bed. Distance between centers is the length of the piece it can turn. Now, that doesn't mean that this lathe can turn a piece 14" in diameter *AND* 40" long as the max diameter is generally over a cut out area of the bed and is meant for bowl turners. __________________

I don't use a lathe much. I have this one from Harbor Fright; it is entirely adequate for my needs. The finish could be better but it is solid and turns wood. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber4706 _______________

Various. You could spend $20 - $60 or more for each or you could get a cheapo set. I got the cheapo set...have to sharpen fairly frequently but work fine. My set of eight was - ready? - $8.95. Here's a high speed steel set (mine aren't) for $35.99. I may buy it :) http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberG066
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:>

Yikes, now I am confused. I think I understand that just because a lathe has a 14" capacity doesn't mean it actually has that capablitly. But where you say "40" long as the max diameter is generally over a cut out area of

Lawrence
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lwhaley wrote:

Yes it does. One can turn a piece 14" in diameter BUT that piece can't be longer than can be accommodated over the bed. The bed is frequently cut out near the head stock so a piece of maybe 3-4" thick by the maximum diameter can be turned but a longer - thicker in this case - piece could not be.
Basically, you can turn any piece that will fit between the head and tail stocks (the "maximum length") while clearing the bed (the "maximum diameter" or "swing"). ______________

No typo, you read it wrong. Try this which changes "as" to "because"...
Now, that doesn't mean that this lathe can turn a piece 14" in diameter *AND* 40" long BECAUSE the max diameter is generally over a cut out area of the bed and is meant for bowl turners.
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dadiOH
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Lawrence I have 4 lathes and one of them is the equivalent to the Craftsman monotube. Mine is Canadian Tire and goes on sale every six weeks of so for about C$150. It will do the job you want. There are lots of copies on the market. A 30 inch spindle an inch in dameter will whip quite a bit so you may want to make a steady rest for the machine too. And get some practice, practice , practice. Any intro set of turning tools should get you what you need, basically a roughing gouge and a skew. You also want a grinding jig for sharpening. Trust me on this one. Even if you are an accomplished tool sharpener you want a jig for the turning tools. There are instructions on my web site. Nothing to sell there, but free plans and tips. Hope this helps. Actually, you can likely make a knocker easier with a draw knife and a shaving horse, but where is the addiction in that? ______ God bless and safe turning Darrell Feltmate Truro, NS, Canada www.aroundthewoods.com

http://www.7corners.com/7c_store/showdetl.cfm?DID=1&offerings_ID=-974133630&ObjectGroup_ID95181403&CATIDf9291778
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Darrell Feltmate wrote:

Thanks Darrell for that very excellent link. Oh yea, I know that I could carve my knockers rather quickly with the drawknife, and I have one. You are right to say it doesn't sound nearly as much fun. and even though it will take me a while to learn to turn a good one, i believe that i will eventually be able to turn one out faster and better on a lathe and I have plenty of wood in my forest to practice on. I am looking for knockers that are perfectly smooth, except for that taper. It would be harder, I think, to get it so smooth with a drawknife. There would be alot of sanding either way but it looks to me like the lathe would really expedite sanding.
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Lawrence, Let us know what you come up with.The chair maker at Sherbrooke Village, part of the Nova Scotia Museum, worked spindles with a draw knife or a treadle lathe depending on the day. He could get the spindles as smooth and round with the draw knife as I can with the lathe, at least to my eye and hand. I can not. ______ God bless and safe turning Darrell Feltmate Truro, NS, Canada www.aroundthewoods.com

monotube.
market.
want
practice ,

on my

helps.
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That was the first thing that came to mind when I read the OPs post. I doubt the "Native Americans" made theirs with a lathe. Likely hand carved.
.

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AFAIK the lathe was unknown in the America's before the European settlement.
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That's what I thought.
wrote:

doubt
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Ralph E Lindberg wrote:

the Indians around here have their own commercial sawmills and woodshops on the reservation. Modern natives have access to all of the same techonology as we have in the dominant culture.
I hardly find it relevant whether or not the lathe was available hundreds of years ago since very few, if any, knockers of that vintage would be likely to still exist. whether or not their tools are carved or turned I do not know. what I do know is that they have the capability. The knockers I observed were very smooth and could have been either turned or carved.
We have no way to know without them telling us or by a more up close observation of their tools which would be, at the least, impolite. I imagine that each ricing team has it's own unique tool fashioned by the ricers them selves or just borrowed from tribal members. Personal property doesn't mean so much to them, it doesn't seem, and they may not even make a great dictinction as to which individual or family "owns" the tools.
Bottom line: It's their business so I don't ask. It's called respect. If I spend enough time on the lake and at the landing, opportunities will arise for me to grab a quick look and that will have to suffice.
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Fri, Sep 15, 2006, 5:17pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@paulbunyan.net (lwhaley) doth sayeth: <snip> I hardly find it relevant whether or not the lathe was available hundreds of years ago since very few, if any, knockers of that vintage would be likely to still exist. <snip> Personal property doesn't mean so much to them, it doesn't seem, <snip>
Depends, some tools are kept in families for decades, and used. A for instance is throwing sticks, a version of boomerangs. Passed down from generation to generation, and still being used. Another for instance, if I'd gotten the tools I'd been promised by my grandfather, I'd be using tools over 200 years old now. As is I do use a few that are around 100 years old, or older.
I wouldn't count on personal property not meaning much to them.
JOAT I am not paranoid. I do not "think" people are after me. I "know" damn well they're after me.
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