Connecting new wood floor to existing wood floor


I am installing an oak tounge and groove floor in our downstairs den. The foyer leading into the den already has oak flooring and we purchased the same type. It matches almost exactly and since the existing floor is only 4 years old, I would like to tie the floors together as cleanly as possible.
What is the most common method of tying floors together. Currently there is a oak threshold piece that runs between the carpet and the ends of the boards in the foyer. I assume the floor boards have been cut off so the groove won't be there on some. I really would like to not have the threshold left in but also would like to create a stagger on the joints so there isn't a straight line. seperating the two rooms.
Any and all suggestions greatly welcomed.
Bill
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When I put the floor down in my house, I did the entire lower level. Because of the fact that the floor went around a series of walls in two different rooms, when it finally met itself to come back together, I was told to expect it to not join up perfectly - and it didn't. What I did, was take two boards and lay them perpendicular to the rest and then let the tongues in the end boards fit into the groove on the perpendicular board. This was sort of a threshold concept but it wasn't raised. It also worked that I made the joint at the opening for the dining room so it helped that there was a doorway there.
If you're at a similar spot where you're at a doorway, you can do the same thing. I walk past this spot everyday and never notice the 'break' in the floor and I even know it's there.
I also considered calling attention to the break by using an inlay piece available from the hardwood flooring dealer but decided against it.
If you're out in the middle of the room, then I would consider using the same technique but using a different type of wood and then make a border around the entire den using this wood. That way, you can still tie it together but have the added feature of a border that will make it look like you intended that way.
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P.S. One more thing, if your doorway is in the center of the room and you have to start your flooring in the center, don't forget to purchase or make some spline, as you will have to reverse the direction of the flooring in the room. (a spline will connect groove to groove in case you didn't now) --dave

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It is not difficult to remove some boards to create the stagger if you are laying the new floor in the same direction as the existing. Get a large chisel and sink it into the board you want to remove. Then beat it with a hammer in the direction you want to move the board (the non captive side) . clean out any debris and fasteners and tap a new longer board in its place. Be sure to use a cutoff from another board between the new board and hammer or you'll ruin the tongue/groove on the end. It's going to be difficult to remove the board at first, but once the fasteners come loose, it'll usually slide. If the board is being especially stubborn, or it's captive on both ends, take a circular saw set to depth and make two parallel cuts on the board you want to remove about 1/2" from either side. Stop the cuts about 1/4" from each end and and remove that center piece. Use a chisel to gently remove the rest of the board. To replace a boadr that is captive on both ends, you'll have to remove the bottom side of the groove on the end and side to replace it. Good luck! --dave

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bill snipped-for-privacy@grainger.com wrote:

Although it will be "close" it will never match exactly. IMHO, trying to make it match is going to look like a mistake. Make it look like you *meant* to do something completely different -- put in a threshold board perpendicular to the foyer boards, and change direction entirely for the boards in the rest of the room.
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