Connect Unisaw to Dryer Outlet

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Roy Smith wrote:

Enough current???? Have actually seen this -- in a failure mode of a breaker - ALTAIALFA (a long time ago in a land far away) But it was a handful of failures in thousands of machines. Highly unlikely -- but maybe not impossible. I will leave it to the EE's in the group who might want to debate this. I am sure that someone here can do some calculations and dig up some data to prove something. I certainly can't/won't these days.

And if the breaker fails by developing a higher resistance? Actually seen this in a handful of failures out of many thousands of motor/breaker circuits in a manufacturing situation. I was just glad I could pass the analysis to someone competent. Again ALTAIALFA -- QA is probably a lot better and techniques have changed -- so it probably doesn't happen any more...
I am beginning to wish that we had the Chemists equivalent of STP (Standard Temperature and Pressure)
Then we could all say that when we mean when we say "normally" -- which isn't used often enough...
Then we wouldn't debate this stuff unless it was egregious enuff to really rile us up. I am so MAD!!! Cause I saw some of these failures 30 years ago and -- IT CAN HAPPEN! I SWEAR! TO DENY IT IS WRONG!!!!
And I swore I would never post on one of these threads. But if a cool head like Robatoy can give at least one shot I will allow myself _once_.
Did I mention I HATE COMPOUND MITER DESIGNS?
I swear by the Red Green payer that I will do this no more. I swear...
OKOK AMT. Breathe deep.
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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WillR wrote:

Then how does it make any difference if the breaker is rated for 1 amp or a billion? If the failure is corrosion of the contacts or something else that causes increased resistance in the contacts it's going to occur on a breaker of any capacity.
The contacts are simply metal touching metal. They may be exactly the same size in breakers with a very wide range of current capacities. What makes the breaker "break" is a mechanism that opens those contacts, not anything having to do with their innate properties.

So? Having a larger breaker would have made no difference.

There is no question that breakers can fail in various ways. The question is whether using a larger one would eliminate the kind of malfunction that you observed, and there is no reason to believe that it would.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
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J. Clarke wrote:

Sounds reasonable.

Have to agree with that assessment.

And probably not even a smaller one. Don't know any more -- any more.
As soon as I could I stick to pure logic, and ittsy bittsy things that couldn't pull my fingers off I was happier the motors were happier -- it was a win-win.
Packets, bits, bytes, words, core memories, adders -- they were all so much simpler -- and if you hit them with a hammer they did not rotate back at you and eat your finger -- or eat their breakers if you shorted their contacts.
Motors -- especially ones with breakers and servos were (to me) inherently untrustworthy...
Hope that explains my position.

Don't think I was arguing that -- for or against. Just pointing out how grateful I was that somebody competent that worked with me could help.
Just just plaintively whining that I wish we had standards like STP so we could discuss things easier -- beyond that...

This was twice -- shudder!!! Hopefully I have displayed complete incompetence and If I ever post in an electrical thread again will be turfed as quickly as possible.
Unless, of course, you want all the calculations done in Mod 11 or Mod 13 -- I can do that. Ohms law and Helmholtz equations - calculated in Mod 13 -- now there's a thought... Insane -- yes but still a thought.
In a matrix - LU factorization would make it easy --- yes it could work.
:-)
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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Hehe. My wife will turn the thermostat *way* up, so that the house will warm up to the desired temperature faster. I can't seem to explain that the air coming out of the ducts is the same temperature when she puts it at 82 as it is when she puts it at 72.
--
Jerry




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Its a concept foreign to everyone of my employees! I have locked all thermostats and I still find some set at 80 in the winter and 60 in the summer.
Even after a lengthy and detailed explanation to my wife, she still thinks it warms or cools faster!!
Dave
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please let me know if you ever come up with a way to explain this to your wife. i need it for my wife also. i have the exact same discussion every winter.

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On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 15:12:03 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"

Try the old landlord trick (which I learned from an electrical contractor): Hide the real thermostat somewhere (like in the ceiling) and leave a fake thermostat for people to play with.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html
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We're married to the same woman?
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on 3/18/2005 4:11 PM Dave Hinz said the following:

And some thought the testosterone was flowing freely around here of late? We ain't seen nothing yet.<g>
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Jerry S. wrote:

much
middle
will warm

the air

82 as

While I don't disagree in general, if the thermostat is located near a heating vent, it may cycle on-off more while the home reaches an equilibrated temperature; not that your wife (or mine for that matter) has thought it through that far.
Cheers, Mike
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wrote:

warm
air
Oh hell - that's nothin'. Ask anyone of us that live in cold country what the first the wife does when she jumps into the cold car... Reaches across the car and turns the damn blower on full. Can't explain to her that she's making us colder by doing that and she has to wait for the engine to heat up.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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wrote:

as
across
she's
Now justaminnit! How many of us are married to this same woman who does this with the house thermostat & heater blower? Mine also used to do this when we had a "fancy" car(69 Imperial) with the thermostat controlled heater system.
--
Nahmie
Those on the cutting edge bleed a lot.
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wrote:

It's like a former roommate who turned up the heat on a boiling (open) pot so the food would cook faster. No amount of explaining about the boiling point of water would convince him otherwise.
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RRRRRRRrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr... Several took the bait. LOL With all the talk about Tom complaining about people making OT posts and him being one of the worst, another post mentioned the electrical saga. Sorry I could not resist.

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The Popiet PocketFisherman LIVES!!!!
Congratulations...LOL
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Steven and Gail Peterson wrote:

No need---as has been noted many times, the circuit breaker is to protect the circuit wiring, <not> the device...
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I had a cutom 220 extension cord made to run a stream pressure washer (kerosene powered boiler) from my dryer outlet to by back yard driveway area. Worked great. You can buy the heavy cable and the plugs at HD or Lowes.

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He asks in all innocence . . . "What's a stream pressure washer?"
(R, D, & G)
--
Nahmie
Those on the cutting edge bleed a lot.
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Drink alot of beer. Or could be a typo for steam...

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If it's an electric dryer, it's probably a dedicated 220V 30A circuit, with a NEMA 14-30R (http://www.leviton.com/sections/techsupp/nema.htm). This is a 4-wire plug, delivering two hots, a neutral, and ground. There's 110V from either hot to neutral, and 220V from one hot to the other.
You don't mention what kind of motor is in your Unisaw, so I'm assuming it's the common 3HP, 220V. In theory, this needs a 220V 15A circuit, but most people put them on a 20A circuit (mostly because it doesn't cost any more to install the 20 and you might need it some day in the future). The circuit you have now will work fine. You would need to put a 14-30P plug on your unisaw. Your saw's cord will have 3 wires -- two hots and a ground. The neutral pin on the 14-30P plug will be left unconnected.
Your dryer needs the neutral because it has internal components that need 110V (the controller, light, probably the motor that makes the drum go around; only the heating element is on 220V). You saw only has the 220V motor, so it doesn't need the neutral.
Now that I've explained all that, please go hire an electrician to do the work, or at least check what you've done. I've made a lot of guesses above about what you've really got from your vague description, any of which could be wrong.
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