Connect Unisaw to Dryer Outlet

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I am currently living in a rental until our house is finished. There is no 220 volt outlet in the garage so I can't use my saw. Not being an electrician, can I plug it into the outlet used by the dryer? I know I will have to change the plug on my saw.
Thanks for the help.
Jim
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Jim Jacobs wrote:

Or change the dryer socket. Spose they would like it netter if you changed your plug. As i recall the molded drier cables are/were just a few $$.
As long as the panel breaker is at least the required capacity.. YES.
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Will
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Will...you didn't even ask if those were metric or Imperial volts. So how can you be so sure?
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Robatoy wrote:

Whew. Now you did, and have covered up my _embarrassing mistake_ How can I ever thank you?
Would a 2 Liter Bottle of Don Pedro Brandy be acceptable? A recent visitor left it here...
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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I know why....LOL That stuff was made to build up courage for the day when they run the bulls. 2 Litres, no less. Don't you need a permit for that?
waitasec... you're not trying to hurt me, are you?!?!?
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On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 14:20:11 GMT, "Jim Jacobs"

Yes
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"> On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 14:20:11 GMT, "Jim Jacobs"

Dryer sockets are commonly used for many welding "buzzboxes". And they draw a lot more amps than most saws.
Just look on the electrical panel to make sure that you have enough amps on that circuit.
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Yes you can providing the amp rating is high enough. More than likely it is. Mine shares that circuit and I can run the dryer and TS at the same time. I did not want either to interrupt the other.
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There is nothing magic about one kind of 220V over another, at least in this 60 Hz country. But you might want to change the circuit breaker to match the saw requirement. You could also change the outlet to match the saw, instead of the other way around. Six of one-half a dozen of the other.
Steve

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<snip> But you might want to change the circuit breaker to match

DON'T do that!! The circuit breaker is there to protect the wiring - not the appliance plugged into it. I'll amend that - you can size it down to a smaller size breaker (15 amp from 20 amp) but never size it up unless you know for sure what size and type the wire is and the length of the run.
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OK, let's assume you can check the wiring gauge size at the panel or at the outlet. If it happens to be beefy enough to handle, say, a 30A breaker, is it then safe to switch out to that larger capacity breaker?
H.
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hylourgos wrote:

at
breaker?
If you don't know, ask an electrician to look at it for you. To many variables such as type of wire, type of insulation, length of run, etc.
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Ok, changing the circuit breaker is a waste of time and money and could be quite dangerous if you increase its rating.
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Also, since it is a rental unit, it's probably better not to mess with the house wiring and just change the plug on the saw.
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Since this is electricity for the dryer, he will have the added advantage of being able to cut green wood and have it dried when the cut is done.
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My drill press is on the same circuit as the lights in my 9 month old sons room. Is that why brown stuff keeps oozing out the end of my boards?
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But he WILL have to use something other than the 4" dryer vent for dust collection. DAMHIKT.
Patriarch
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OK, I will admit to the assumption that a dryer has a higher amp rating than a table saw. A 30 or 40 amp table saw would be a real monster. Like a sawmill. I would go for a circuit breaker that trips near (but above) the saw spec, so it does provide protection.
Steve

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on 3/18/2005 12:13 PM Steven and Gail Peterson said the following:

Once again: The circuit breaker is there to protect the WIRING, NOT the appliance. The rating of the saw, etc. when stated as "Use only on 15 AMP circuit" states the MINIMUM rating for the circuit to which the saw is connected.
That essentially the logic behind the fact you don't have any one amp circuit breakers protecting your electric toothbrush recharger, the nightlight in the hallway, etc.
The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw. The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw. The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw. The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw. The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw. The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw. The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw. The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw. The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw. The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw. The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw. The circuit breaker protects the wiring, not the saw.
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The wiring? Not the saw?
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