Confidences

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A friend of mine and I were discussing, last weekend, an experience we both enjoyed a few years ago. The event was put on by a 5-foot-0" German fellow who demonstrated how to cut dovetails. He built a foot-locker, right in front of out eyes, without using a marking gage, guide, template...just a pencil and a backsaw. The pins and tails were large...about 3", but it 'clicked' together just fine. He basically blew our little minds.
I remember thinking how confident he must have been of his abilities to pull that off in front of 20+ people. He had this cocky little grin.. it looked kinda cool on him, because it wasn't arrogant.
That, in turn, made me think about which tool, if any, I am pretty confident in using with predictable results.
My conclusions?
Belt sander and biscuit joiner. I can make those do things.
I'm working on the jigsaw...right now I'd grade myself a solid 80%.... 75%? See? Confidence.
How about you guys?
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"Robatoy" wrote in message

ShopVac ... just upgraded from a broom and getting wicked with it.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/13/05
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I have both, Leon said with a smug look of accomplishment.
But my shop vac is a Craftsman that would puts out a sound that a jet fighter ready for take off would be jealous of.
I did finally buy a large aluminum dust pan and much prefer that to the vac. I really hate dumping the vac and cleaning out the pleated filter. It stays hooded up to the router table most of the time. I am beginning to believe that these dust collection devices simply collect all that fine dust and waste into a single compact area that eventually gets all over you when you empty it.
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Using both blunt and sharp tools to cut myself whilst at all times keeping the blood off the workpieces/wood. Great skill required.
%69%20%6c%6f%76%65%20%77%6f%6f%64%77%6f%72%6b%69%6e%67%20%62%75%74%20%69%6d%20%63%72%61%70 http://www.connoraston.com
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Leon wrote:

I've got one labeled QSP for "Quiet Super Power" with a 6hp sticker on it. I can't even imagine how loud the un-quiet ones must be. And I'm absolutely amazed that companies can get away putting a 6hp sticker on something that draws less than 10amps.

I've got the gore-tex filters, but I don't think I'm getting any net benefit from them when I wallow in a dust cloud for 10 minutes trying to clean them. And how is it that bags cost like 3 or 4 bucks *each*? Can't some company in Chaiwan churn 'em out for us at a reasonable cost? Hmmm....maybe that's how I'll make my millions....
JP
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I would like to take a closer look at Festool or Fein.

I have the gore-tex filter also and my findings also when cleaning. My filter is probably 8 years old and working fine. I use no bags. Each time I clean mine I try to think of a way to put the blowing end in the filter and toss both in the large trash can, close the lid, and turn on the blower.
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Leon wrote:

Yeah - me too. I've got a Festool Rotex sander and it really is an excellent, excellent tool. Next big check I get I'm going to purchase another Festool (tool) and a vacuum to boot. The combos save you a *little* money anyways.

I usually take mine out to the big & beautiful American Basswood in the front yard and try to stay upwind while I clean it out.
JP
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I finally learned to hold the filter so that the pleats are horizontal and I rake my fingers across the BOTTOM pleats rotate a little and repeat. this seems to make the least mess.
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I strongly suggest you look at the Fein TurboII instead of the Festool CT22. I own both and the Fein was bought after the Festool. The CT 22 is an excellent vacuum. The Fein is that much better. The Fein also holds a lot more solid surface dirt in the bags, before the suction diminishes, than the Festool.
Festool isn't perfect either. The Linear Sander LS 130 isn't very good. My friend's shop has tried and tried to make it work. No cigar. He offered to sell it to me for half price.... he was clearly disappointed.
I have the Rotex 150E and just love it. The other Festool piece I'd like to own would be that honkin' router of theirs. 2000 watts of German engineered power.
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Robatoy wrote:

Thanks for the reply. I've always heard excellent things about the Fein, but I was so impressed with the Festool sander I figured I'd stick with the same brand vacuum. I'll definitely think further before purchasing.
JP *********************************************************************** Of course I also need an airless sprayer, a sliding TS, a 16" jointer, and exactly 376 other vital tools before I can fully implement The Master Plan.
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Kreg Pocket Hole jig and the biscuit jointer.
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Uh Hum.... Biscuit JOINER.
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Of we make an 'L' shape from 2 boards, which method will be stronger: a) we run the screws from the piece along the grain nto the board with the cross grain.. or: b) we screw from the cross-grain side into the long grain.
I dunno if my kwestion is clear.
lemme try this;
The one board is vertical, standing up in front of you as you look at it. The piece to be joined, is to the right, running horizontally. The seam will be vertical. Do the screws run from right to left. or left to right?
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Assuming an orientation like if you were assembling a face frame with pocket holes drilled into the wider side of the board.
If like a face frame, screw the horizontal piece into the vertical piece. This way the screw threads go into the cross/side grain of the vertical piece. While the head of the screw can split the grain on the horizontal piece if tightened too much the use of larger washer head pocket hole screws helps spread out the load. If you screw the vertical piece into the horizontal piece the screw threads would be going in to the horizontal piece end grain and that would be a weaker connection.
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Robatoy wrote:

I've seen a few very large chests or trunks down at the antique shops near Baltimore's Inner Harbor that had similar large dovetails. Some had a single tail per corner, and were cross- nailed to secure them. Simple, strong, functional.

Wrecking bar.
--

FF


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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

Funny you should say that. I'm due to remove a kitchen which was built 'in situ'. The kicks are 4x4 lumber nailed to the joists with very long, big nails. Judging by the size of the smileys left behind by the sledge..they used a 10 pounder. All-in-all a huge nightmare. A friend of mine suggested I'd buy one of them Swedish renovator bars.. not the Gransfors..but the other bar ..starts with a T... It's supposed to be close to 100.00 Can$...
If I cut those nails, I'd never be able to get a hold of them again..and the have to come out...somehow.
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Robatoy wrote:

The local home depots carry digging irons in with the gardening tools. Basicly, they are like an all-steel carpenter's slick with a very long handle, up to 6 feet long. You might be able to grind the edge down so it could be driven between two boards and then pry away. ISTR they were priced well below $100.00.
You are supposed to thrust these into the ground and then pry to break up hard dirt, sort of like a linear pick so they may take the prying. OTOH, they are usually used in post-holes so they aren't used being pried at large angles.
Best bet, of course, is if you can get to the point and drive it back out.
--

FF


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On 5 Mar 2006 10:16:55 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

Fred.. I've used digging irons many times when building fences... you can wear 2 guys out trying to pry roots out before you'll bend a bar.. *g*
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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"Robatoy" wrote

Rob, cut the 4x4 with the sawzall about 3 cm on either side of the spike location. With your trusty Stanley chisel, split the remaining 4x4 on either side of said spike, removing the remaining piece of 4x4. Back the auto wrecker up and attach the chain to the spike, lift ... and repeat. Quicker and easier than trying to rescue a piece of 4x4 with spikes and donkey tracks all over it.
Regards,
Rick
Oh yes, my fee? Tip a nice lager for me.
.... and WHEN are you getting YOUR ShopBot???????
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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

And they look great too.
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