Computer in the shop

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That was my point, now I can just pipe my cable signal into my computer and use that to record my shows. I don't know how much TiVO runs, but the set-up I'm using can be had for about $50 (TV tuner card) and included software. Electronic programming guides can be found online for free (www.titantv.com). Plus, there's no monthly fees (something I'm assuming TiVO has, but I'm not sure). I can then burn the shows onto CDs or DVDs (if I want particularly high quality) and watch them on my TV via the DVD player. Or, just watch them on the computer. I think it kicks butt.
Mike

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Mike in Mystic said:

I've been doing that very thing since 1996, when a decent video capture card cost $800. Guess what that card is worth now... I DO have the complete NYW on disk, however... <g>
Greg G.
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Hey greg,
Could you send me an email, I tried to reply directly to you, but it didn't work.
Mike
<Greg G.> wrote in message

and
(if
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Mike in Mystic wrote:

My laptop & desktop each lost a hard drive in the past 12 months. Bummer reinstalling everything, and there were some things I didn't have backed up... <sigh>
RAID 0 is "Striped Disk Array without Fault Tolerance." IMO this is too risky. My next desktop will be mirrored hard drives at a minimum.
My $0.02
-- Mark
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I thought about that, but at the moment my storage needs are pretty high. I've only had this system for about a month and have used a full 200 Gb of storage space. I turn over a lot of space with multimedia work - I've gotten pretty involved in making home movies with my DV camcorder. Reinstalling stuff IS a bummer, but it really isn't that big a deal. I've done it many times, and it usually takes maybe 2-3 hours max. Not that big a deal, IMO. I routinely backup data to CD's, and now that I have the DVD writer, I've been using some DVD-RW discs (basically extra 4.3 Gb hard drives). I would bet I only have about 10-20 Gb of "critical" data that I need to make sure I don't lose. Plus I have access to network storage space (about 100 Gb for my personal use) that I can access from home, too.
In all the years I've been using computers, I've only had one hard drive fail. Maybe I'm just lucky, but I think that the mfgs have gotten pretty good at quality control.
The other big issue is that the RAID 1 arrays suffer pretty significantly in performance compared to the RAID 0 arrays. What's the point of having all the processor, memory and video performance if you handcuff it with a slow data storage/retrieval architecture?
If this were business intensive and I couldn't handle a day of downtime, worst case, then I probably would do the same as you and go for the RAID 1, but then I'd probably go with a terabyte of total storage (500 Gb usable).
Mike

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Mike in Mystic wrote:

To amplify... <g> installing the OS isn't bad. I've done it probably 200 times since Win3.x. It's everything else I use as a software developer that takes the install/config time. Starting with FDISK it's about a 1.75 day process. Office XP Developer, Visual Studio.NET, SQL Server 2000, ... This time around I didn't install Delphi, Visual Studio 6 or IBM's DB2 database. Hope I don't need 'em anymore.

I'd had good luck for years too then :-( two failures in a few months.

IIRC RAID 5 has performance and fault tolerance. More info here. http://www.acnc.com/raid.html
<brain fart> You could leave your transient data on RAID 0 for max speed and have the OS and programs on mirrored (if you were concerned about fault tolerance). Especially on separate controllers that would be very fast. I've read of systems setup this way. </brain fart>
-- Mark
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RAID 5 is what the big boys use. It has some overhead but if you spread the stripes across a lot of drives it isn't bad. This was crucial in AS/400s where the loss of one drive usually meant you lost all of them.
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I'm lucky enough at work to have a RAID-5 setup with hot swap on my desktop machine (along with two 3+ghz P4 Xeons and 2GB ram). It just showed up on my desk a couple months ago because I guess we needed more machines for our simulations and I had the oldest computer. It's a 6 drive array, several hundred GB of SCSI drives. I don't even know what to do with it all. It's a little more than I think I'd do for a shop computer. My 5 year old HP is fine for that.
Greg wrote:

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    Greetings and Salutations.
On Fri, 09 Jan 2004 16:20:25 GMT, "Mark Jerde"

    My experiences have been mixed. I just lost a hard drive in one of my systems, a Seagate, that just would not load any more, or recognize. I had a Western Digital drive (20 gig) that went for about 4 weeks in a web server before going toes up. Of course, that was after I had run a burn in on it for a week.... Apparently WD has had some quality issues with the 20 gig drives, as my supplier said they had gotten a LOT of the 20 gig units back. The bigger drives seem reliable...but that 20 gig mech just was a bit flaky.

    You REALLY should not see a performance hit if you use a RAID controller (either separate or built into the motherboard). The controller takes care of all that, and, at a fast enough speed that there should not really be a hit. Now...if you are trying to do it with sofware emulation...good luck...even if you ARE using Linux.

    Depends on what is important to save. Any data that is not backed up on at least ONE separate media is subject to loss. I would go with having everything on the most fault tolerant media possible. After all, it can really darken one's day to finish up an 8-10 hour editing session and have a drive crash and lose everything.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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Dave Mundt wrote:

My practice is to constantly write to three hard drives: - Work on either the desktop or laptop's C: - Check the work into the version control system running on the desktop's E: - "Get latest version" to the C: of the other computer.
At the end of the day I often zip everything and send it to an email account that I access only by webmail so if the office burned down overnight the latest & greatest is safely offsite.
-- Mark
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weird, I have an old Imac(1998), and i've beaten the hell out of the drive, many force restarts(removing the power cord) and moved huge numbers of files through it(I have several games which I install, and delete when I get bored of them, along with zbrush and all my random drawings, so it has a lot of erasing and writing, and it never died(it died once, but a little reformatting fixed that)

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Autocad....sigh..... Speaking of money down the toilet....we have till the 15 to upgrade some of our 2000 seats or they will no longer be updateable....to me that is extorsion. I use Land Development Desktop and Civil packages which cost about $8000 for a new seat...sigh...

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Sucks, don't it? I have LDDT 2i, and they've given me until June to upgrade mine. I can't afford the damn extortion, but it's better than buying three new ones, I guess.
Jon E

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I think he meant "Release 2000, seats". I can't imagine any company in the world having 2000 seats of Autocad. Talk about bankruptcy.
Jon
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yeah i am a drafter and designer, i am pretty good at site grading and earthworks, we are doing alot of schools all over ohio.

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Rick Cox wrote: [snip]

Having made a living as a computer jockey since nineteen and aught sixty-two, and having bought a RAS in 1965, here are some drips of wisdom (?) from jo4hn's john. If WW tools had changed as much as computers in the past 40 years, one would walk into the shop, say good-day to the RAS, tell it cherry end-table, and go watch tv. The saw would quickly order and accept delivery of the wood, oversee jointing and planing, joinery, dry fit, glue-up, sanding and painting within a few hours.
The same could be said of toasters and sewing machines. Somebody already did it with cars. The computer is a different tool in the infancy of its development. The TS (and toaster and...) are fairly mature tools and will not change much unless the addition of a computer chip will create a more saleable item. Dream away folks.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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The creation thereof is the basic permise behind the latest in CNC machinery. The problem is keeping the cost down. I would love to have a machine in the shop, that cost less than a grand, that you could basically program to create a ball-and-claw cabriole leg, and then walk away. Even When I was a kid, sometime in elementary school, the Stanley plant in town let us tour the shop floor. There we saw workers loading boxes full of wood chunks, essentially cubes or rounds, into a hopper, and removing totes full of completed tool handles from the other end. Inside, the machine spun several cutters and removed everything that wasn't programmed to be a tool handle.
Jon E
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Rick Cox wrote:

The bright side is that the $448 Wal-Mart POS Xmas special computer is three times faster than the one I use every day. The days of spending $2300 on a computer are over unless you're a gamer.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Silvan wrote:

Software development machines can be expensive too. Multiple monitors, dual CPUs & max memory for running virtual machines, RAID for speed & fault tolerance, ...
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde wrote:

Well, yeah, that too. It takes me 50 minutes to do a complete build of Rosegarden. One of the guys just bought a new toy that can do it in 2.3 minutes. Ouch.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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