Compressor Recomendation

I am in the market for a new compressor. The unit will be used mainly for one, sometimes two framing nailers moving at a pretty good pace. I have narrowed my choices down to four seemingly identical compressors, all with four gallon tanks, and somewhere around 4.1 SCFM.
My question is, is there any one preffered brand among the following:
Jenny AM780-HC4V
Emglo AM782--HC4V
Hitachi EC12
Makita MAC2400
Any other compressors to seriously consider?
Thank You.
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the Hitachi EC12 has been a good performer for me.....
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depending what you mean by a "pretty good pace" you'll likely be wearing these small compressors out after maybe a year or so of use. if your research seems to indicate that they really are pretty much the same machine, I'd be shopping for price.
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My experience with the compressors is different than bridger's. These compressors will last a surprisingly long time if you take care of them.
One of my subs uses the Hitachi compressor you list (roofing applicator) and has for some time. It has been solid for him and he runs a couple of guns with it. He has used it hard 5-7 days a week, probably about 8 hours a day. It has shot hundreds of thousands of nails with no problems. He has had his for a couple of years now, and it still runs OK, considering it crashes around in the back of his truck and he doesn't believe in oil changes. The fasterner guys I use from time to time sell this compressor to contractors and they don't get them back for repairs as much as the Makita.
Like their nailguns, all the contractors I know have gotten rid of their DeWalt air equipment. Emglo is wholly owned by DeWalt, and they are trying to regain part of their market share by reintroducing what I believe is the old Airmate. That compressor when made by Emglo was (to me) the gold standard of all portable compressors. I knew guys that used them every day for actual years. However, being purchased by the DeWalt group would sure make me suspicious of quality.
I believe the Makita is completely made in China from Chinese parts. Like all tools that are 100% Chinese, ya pay yer money and ya takes yer chances. You might get a ring tailed winner or just as easily get a lemon.
Most of these compressors use a motor and a slightly different rating to achieve their numbers and make their products look different. However, having several compressors over the years and repairing just as many, most of them have the same parts on them. Puma seems to be a favorite maker for the Asian groups, and I have seen them on anything from Harbor Freight to Makita. I have a no name that looks exactly like the Hitachi, and has the same heads on it. It came to me several years ago in a package deal couldn't say no to, and it has run like a champ ever since doing roofing/framing/etc.
With all that being said, I personally would go with the Hitachi. But I am not sure there is a lot of difference anymore in these machines as pretty much considered throw aways. But this machine seems to be pretty rugged, and seems to stay out of the shop.
You used to buy rebuild kits yourself for compressors that had rings, seals, reed valves, etc, in them. No more. Take one of these things to the shop after you have had it and used it for a while and you will probably be better off with a new machine.
I have a Bostitch that I am using now (another package deal) that I like as far as power and running, but this one has a Taiwanese motor on an Italian compressor head. Go figure. It isn't any better or any worse than any other compressor in its class, but it won't run more than one framer (it wasn't designed to) or roofing nailer.
But if you really wanted to be the queen of the roller derby for an excellent quality compressor, check this out:
http://tinyurl.com/233k6z
I love the Speedaire tools, I just don't want to let go of the dough. I had a big roll around years ago, and it was the best compressor I have ever owned.
Robert
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I have a 1 3/4 HP Thomas Air-Pac that has been around since '87 and still works good. It's a twin hotdog and gets to 100 PSI in lickedy split. However, a lesser machine does just as well. I really wish that I had a small, lightweight pancake machine to take out to jobs (since I am older and have had rotator cuff surgery). Keep in mind that for most uses, nail guns don't require much CFM. If you are a framer, go with any of the good ones that you mentioned, but pay attention to the warranty and availability of service for it you have available in your area or from your dealer. I am just glad that you are carrying around those Framing gun and I'm not!
best wishes, woodstuff
"dave12345" wrote in message | I am in the market for a new compressor. The unit will be used mainly | for one, sometimes two framing nailers moving at a pretty good pace. I | have narrowed my choices down to four seemingly identical compressors, | all with four gallon tanks, and somewhere around 4.1 SCFM. | | My question is, is there any one preffered brand among the following: | | Jenny AM780-HC4V | | Emglo AM782--HC4V | | Hitachi EC12 | | Makita MAC2400 | | Any other compressors to seriously consider? | | Thank You. |
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I've had this one for about 5 years now. (Amazon.com product link shortened)76039059&sr=1-5 Does fine with two guns. Much like any other oiled machine it doesn't like to run in cold weather. It's been a winner. --dave

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