Compressor Leakage

I have a new Campbell Hausfeld 60 gal. compressor that doesn't want to maintain any pressure over a period of time. If I run the compressor and bring it up to pressure, then turn off the motor, within 48 hours the pressure is down below 20 psi. Obviously, there is a leak somewhere in one of the connections, or in the tank itself.
I've talked to a contractor buddy that uses several small portable compressors often, and he tells me that this is normal - not to worry about it. To me, it seems wrong. I can see if the pressure dropped down a bit over time, but to completely empty in 2 days?
So, what is a reasonable expectation for a 60 gal compressor holding pressure?
The tank has a big sticker claiming that it includes on site warranty service from the manufacturer, should I try to take them up on their offer?
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Does it leak if you disconnect all the hoses?
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Obviously.
I notice zero leakage on my 60 gal compressor so I'll come down on the side of your situation being abnormal. Before getting onsite warranty service, I'd first try to identify the source of the leak. Use some leak test fluid, either commercial or a homemade solution of soapy water in a spray bottle, and check each joint in the system, both on and around the compressor tank and any piping runs.
Unless you had the system commercially installed, and the warranty is from the installer, I doubt the compressor/tank warranty will cover leaks in the piping.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Mike wrote:

The first thing coming out of my compressor is a ball and socket cutoff valve, with the oil/water extractor hanging off of that, followed by the quick release hose fitting. If I throw the cutoff value to the "off" position (which I always do when I'm not using it) my compressor will hold that tank of air until hell freezes over. If not, it will fire up about once a day (usually at 2:00am in the morning), particularly if a hose is connected. Those quick-release fittings are not the most air-tight contraptions on the planet...
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Use some soapy water in a squirt bottle. Pump up to top pressure. Start spraying on all threaded conections into tank. Then work your way down stream on any thing like the regulater connections, etc. You should see small bubbles wherever you have a leak. Then dissasemble and add teflon tape or even better plumbers pipe dope and try to fix it like that.
Mine holds forever unless I leave a gun on the end of a connected hose.

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Can't comment on your compressor setup, but I do know that rubber tires leak air over a period of time. For a start, you might want to disconnect all hoses and fittings to see if there's still leakage. If there isn't, then you'll have a specific area to examine.
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Because it is so new, have you checked the drain on the bottom? Typically these not closed tight on new tanks. Being located on the bottom, you may have not noticed it or forgotten to tighten it down.
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Can you not hear the leak????? I have a 20 gallon compressor that I purposely leave the drain valve open far enough that it will bleed down to nothing in 2 days, like yours is doing. I have no problem hearing the leak.
Being new I would recommend turning the hose pressure down to "zero" and disconnecting the hose to begin eliminating possibilities. Spray a soapy water mix on all connections and look for bubbles.
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As many have said, a bottle of Windex or other soapy water in a spray bottle should make short work of finding a leak. One possibility that has not been discussed is the check valve that keeps back pressure out of the piston heads. Your check valve might be holding enough to allow the compressor to start back up, but leaking enough to loose the air. Soap the fittings first. Soap the whole tank (it probably could stand a wash job anyway) especially where feet or brackets are welded on and the bottom which may have rusted. If no bubbles, I would suspect the check valve. They are often where the metal tube comes off the compressor head and enters the tank. There is an intake port on the compressor head where it gets air, if the check valve is leaking back it may show bubbles there.
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