compressor from garage sale

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Hey, I bought a compressor from a garage sale yesterday. Paid $20, seems to be between 13 and 20 gallons. What I wanted was an oil type compressor that uses a belt.
I could not take the oil less type of noise anymore.
I thought I was taking a risk, pretty rusted on the outside, but didn't appear deeply rusted. I shook the thing did not hear water in it (WRONG)...
When I got it home still did not hear water in it... opened up the petcock after charging it up and holy crap the most rusted water... and probably a pint to quart of water came out.
So what chance do I have of saving this tank? Where I used to live we had a scales air compressor place nearby but they closed... I don't find any of them around any more.. not close by. The rust on the outside is all superficial and can be sanded and painted ... I need to get into the tank with a 3/4 square end and see.. Anyone have some real info on how to treat this?
Thanks.
--
Jeff

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On 5/5/13 2:53 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I guess I don't understand what's to save. Does it still compress air? You drained out the water. Put a filter on the output and use it.
I think we'd all be surprised by how much water and rust are on the inside of the tanks we use every day. :-)
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-MIKE-

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On 5/5/2013 4:56 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

water out of my tank weekly, how long do you let it sit there. I figure that years of sitting means deep rust inside. Based on the stink of that water, I'd have to say it's been in there a long time.
--
Jeff

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On 5/5/2013 5:16 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I knew what it was 30 years ago.
Might be too late, but anyone know what the name is.
--
Jeff

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On 5/5/13 4:21 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I'm going on 13 years with my current compressor and it work like the day I bought it. I think i remember letting a few ounces of water out of it several years ago. Yes, it was brown.
To the best of my knowledge, emptying water is important to keep water out of your pneumatic tools and the finish material you might be spraying using the compressor.
I don't think it affects the performance of the compressor.
--

-MIKE-

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On 5/5/2013 6:45 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

just pinhole, it blew from rust.
So I worry, I wanted to bring this into the basement. My current one wakes me up at night when I forget to shut it...
This one will be quieter if I forget. But I need to know it will be ok.
--
Jeff

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wrote:

I put mine in the garage and piped air from there. It might be a little more of a challenge in this house. I'll see in a few weeks (depends on exactly where walls line up - might be very simple).
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"woodchucker" wrote:

So what else is knew? ------------------------------------------------

So the owner is a little forgetful.
Question: What is the condition of the relief valve? ----------------------------------------------------

IMHO, only a fool would keep and air compressor in the basement or other confined space.
When it comes to pressurized vessels around your home, assume they are going to explode and plan accordingly.
Lew
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On 5/5/2013 8:02 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

So I guess in your mind my garage might be better. In my mind neither is great. But because it is in the basement it gets taken care of way more than it would in the garage.

--
Jeff

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On 5/5/13 6:26 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I keep hearing about it, too, but it's always a friend of a friend of an uncle's boss. And I hear about it being from rust, too, but it's never confirmed. There are always other factors responsible when investigations are done. I've seen articles about talks in big shops "exploding" and causing damage and injuries. These are usually big, big tanks and the injured were standing nearby and got cut by metal shards still attached to the tank.
13-20 gallon tank isn't going to "explode" with enough force to cause the kind of damage you read about. BTW, when the pressure in mine gets to high, the pressure release valve lets out a bunch of air. If you're doesn't have one of those, it's probably a good idea to instal one.
--

-MIKE-

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"-MIKE-" <

xxx This sounds like an acetylene generator incident. They were common many years ago. xxx

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"-MIKE-" <

Don't want to rain on your parade, but how big do you think those pressure cookers in Boston were/are?
BTW, a pressure relief valve is a must.
Even your hot water tank has one.
Lew
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On 5/5/13 10:24 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I hope you're joking. There was a lot more than air in those things.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

"-MIKE-" wrote:

Absolutely not kidding, shrapnel is shrapnel regardless of the source.
Lew
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On 5/5/13 11:11 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

That's kind of the point. There is no shrapnel when an air tank "explodes." Why do I keep putting explodes in quotation marks? Because of the very misconception you have and others are having. The energy from a bursting air tank is no where near enough to cause shrapnel.
The energy caused by gun powder is many multitudes higher than an air tank. The velocity of the explosion is also many magnitudes higher.
Oh, and last time I looked at air compressors, non of the tanks were packed with ball bearings, either. sheesh.
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-MIKE-

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wrote:

OK, when it comes to air receiver failures that cause damage or injury, they are virtually NEVER rust related. They are almost always brittle fractures - related to a bad weld or a fatigue crack - most often a fatigue crack related to a bad weld. This caused a catastrophic failure and instand decompression - which DOES cause serious structural damage and can cause grievious injuries.
Rust failure is virtually ALWAYS a gradual failure, which causes little if any damage or injury in the average small air receiver
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

"-MIKE-" wrote:

Lew Hodgett wrote:

"-MIKE-" wrote:

Lew Hodgett wrote:
What do you call the parts of the vessel that are created when a vessel bursts?
Chopped liver?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- "-MIKE-" wrote:

Lew Hodgett wrote:
You seem to have difficulty understanding what is written.
I made no mention of gun powder, ball bearings or any other items of IBS (Intellectual Bull Shit) you attempt to introduce to confuse the issue.
My comment simply stated that the size of the vessel is totally independent of it's ability to raise the havoc created if it were to burst in an area where people were assembled.
What causes a vessel to exceed design specifications and fail by bursting is a totally different discussion.
What remains relevant is that if a vessel bursts in an occupied area, chances are pretty good that somebody is going to get hurt.
Nothing more, nothing less.
Lew
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On Sun, 5 May 2013 21:11:50 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Those pressure cookers were shrapnel accelerated by explosive. That's considerably different than a compressor container giving way to air pressure. Almost invariably, the compressor will burst at a pinhole or maybe a little larger area.
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For someone who claims to be an engineer, you have some odd notions. Those pressure cookers were ruptured by exploding gunpowder. Do you *really* think that the pressure developed by an air compressor (9 to 10 atmospheres is typical) is anywhere nearly comparable to the pressure developed by igniting gunpowder in a small confined volume? Do you *really* think that a bursting compressor tank will create the same kind of "shrapnel" as a pressure cooker that was packed with ball bearings and nails?
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On Mon, 06 May 2013 11:34:44 +0000, Doug Miller wrote:

I found this:
"One gram of blackpowder gives you 718 calories of heat, 270 cubic centimeters of gas,"
So if we knew how much powder the bombers used and the volume of the pressure cooker we could come up with a pressure.
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