Compressed Air Plumbing for Shop

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I am going to route compressed air from my compressor location to one or two other positions in my shop. I am looking at about 50 or more feet of plumbing. I Googled some information regarding PVC, and while it is economical, I still am not comfortable. I have come down to using standard 1/2" black gas pipe and fittings.
Any other ideas, drawbacks, etc.
Thanks
RonB
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I went cheap. I bought 100' from Harbor Freight of 3/8 line. Its stiff, but I live in a ranch and wanted some drops in the shop and all the way out to the garage. I used up all the hose in a run. I picked up some tees and 3/8 barbs and made drops with tees offering a connection point and drain valve. It is great. The hose did have to be returned because it just was not well made, the second hose has done well.
$19 for the hose on sale, and probably 20 in Ts, ball valves and quick connects. A lot better than moving my compressor from the basement to the garage over and over, or running a hose up the stairs and letting all the bugs in.
Plus it's easy enough to add drops by cutting the main line and sticking a new T in.
If you are worried about 3/8, get the 1/2 line, there's some Goodyear line both rubber and plyovac (sp??)
On 5/17/2012 12:07 PM, RonB wrote:

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On 5/17/2012 11:07 AM, RonB wrote:

I like tiredospam would go the air "hose" route. QUICK and cheaper.
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Avoid the PVC. An alternative though, is other plastic air hoses made for that purpose. They are flexible and at worst, will split rather than shatter.
Black pipe is a good way to go. Durable and reasonably priced. I just paid $1.25 a foot for some. Copper is better, but much more costly.
TIP: Once you figure where you want the drops, add two or three more. If you are joining two lengths, use a tee and plug rather than a coupler. You'll be thankful in a year or five when you want to add another leg.
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I've thought about running a standard air hose for my compressed air piping. Except for splicing into it, it's cheap for good quality lengths (vs pipe) and going to be much easier to route.
There's systems made exactly for this purpose that look like they won't break the bank ($100 for a basic setup, probably 2-300 for something nice) and will probably be safer than PVC. Looks like RapidAir is one of the big systems.
PVC should be fully grounded by wrapping a metal pipe around it. *g*
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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Yep, pretty nice. HF was selling that for under $40... but it disappeared from their product list. Wish I had bought it.
Looks like a PEX system basically, except they have the hardware for the drops that make nice connection endpoints.
Right now northern tool is $99 for that setup. Rockler $139.99
You buy additional T's and outlets.
On 5/17/2012 2:38 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

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"RonB" wrote:

---------------------------------- Avoid PVC like it was a bomb, because that is exactly what pvc pipe and compressed air create.
1/2" pipe is too small for distribution piping.
Run at least 1" pipe.
You can buy 5 ft precut and threaded pipe nipples from a plumbing supply house.
Connect nipples with a "Tee" with side pointed up toward ceiling.
Add 2, 1/2" Street ells and reducer bushing at the tee so that the outlet is now pointing down.
Add 1/2?" hose with a quick connect fitting to reach belt high for quick connect.
Incline 1" pipe about 1/2"/12" run.
Add petcock at end of 1" run to drain.
Have fun.
BTDT, don't need the T-Shirt.
Lew
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On 5/17/2012 10:07 AM, RonB wrote:

I have copper but I did it before the price went *way* up. I know of a lot of places (tire shops, etc.) that have black pipe. I personally wouldn't hesitate to use schedule 80 PVC but then I never exceed 120 psi on my compressor.
Max
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On Thu, 17 May 2012 12:47:52 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

Worked in a plant where the air lines were PVC they went BANG about once a year. Not nice for your ears if it was near you. Non static loads of being pressurized and depressurized weakens the PVC joints.
Mark
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This periodically gets beat to death on rec.crafts.metalwoking. Search their archives. The general consensus is that PVC is not a good idea because of the shrapnel when a PVC line goes boom.
CP
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wrote:

And it is WHEN, not IF.
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On 5/18/2012 3:23 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

how long does it take? the shop i retired from was built in '74 or so and was still doing fine when i left in '06. (160 psi kick off pressure) Also, my own garage has had pvc air plumbing for almost the same length of time. Only 130 psi at home.
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Steve Barker
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The biggest problem is with impact damage. Something strikes the PVC which is under pressure and it fails catastrophically. Enclosing it in suitable materials to prevent impacts and contain the fragments is allowable.
They do recommend a max of 100psi when using protected or buried PVC.
scott
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On Fri, 18 May 2012 18:12:46 -0500, Steve Barker

You really are an obnoxious snot aren't you?
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Plonk #1
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Seattle breeds a lot of them.
------- "Jim Weisgram" wrote in message
Plonk #1
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On 5/18/2012 7:09 PM, Dave wrote:

no, why? A simple ask and answer situation as i see it.
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Steve Barker
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On Sat, 19 May 2012 11:34:54 -0500, Steve Barker

Why? You were given a substantial amount of advice, most of it pertaining to your safety and you tossed it aside as being completely irrelevant.
That's why you're an obnoxious snot.
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He can do the world a favor and keep doing stupid stuff like that. One of these times something will finally get him???
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On Mon, 21 May 2012 21:17:20 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

NOW who's being an obnoxious snot?
You kids _behave_ now, y'hear?
-- Progress is the product of human agency. Things get better because we make them better. Things go wrong when we get too comfortable, when we fail to take risks or seize opportunities. -- Susan Rice
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