Compressed Air

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I cannot use the cans of compressed air in the house. Is there a device that would make a good substitute? My dad used to use empty dish washing detergeant bottles, but I want more pressure than that.
The small "air compressors" I see online that look like they are for filling up basketballs, etc. might work if they came with suitable attachments.
Any recommendations?
Thanks, Bill
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Why not?

What do you want to do with your compressed air?
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wrote in message >

Because I am allergic/sensitive to something that comes out of those aerosal cans, and many like them (they warn you on the side of the can that its not just "air").
I can use them outside, but I've dealt with enough reactions (after using them inside) to make me consider another solution that I can use conveniently for the rest of my days.
I would like to use it in the computer case and the CPU fan, especially, and I can think of woodworking applications too.
The $9.99 foot pump looks like a great idea if it would get the job done.
Thanks, Bill
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If the $10 foot pump doesn't work, then you might consider a CO2 filled canister which is the same gas you create when you exhale. I saw an ad recently where they were selling these canisters for truckers and people to fill flat tires. Yes, it is likely bigger than you're probably thinking about, but I'm willing to bet one can obtain a smaller version.
The big version was advertised as being able to fill almost 10 truck tires and you had to go to a place locally to fill it up, but something similar might be a work around for you to consider.
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wrote in message >

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On Sun, 25 Jan 2009 18:08:14 -0500, "Lee Michaels"

out waaaaay more air than the little squeeze bulbs normally recommended for that job.
-dickm
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farts during manufacture. Good thing those cans aren't made in Texas, eh?
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says...

Something like difluoroethane, perhaps?
For inhalation: Move person to fresh air.
Skin or eyes: Flush with water. If irritation persists, call a physician or poison control center immediately.
Ingestion: Do not induce vomiting. Call physician immediately.
oh yeah... and it's flammable too.
If so, I'd bet you've misnamed your reaction to it.
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Yes, I don't enjoy using the stuff. I'm "chemically sensitive" in general. Working with plywood gives me even more grief by comparison.
If I use the spray cans indoors, I'll just experience a mild shortness of breath for 15 or 20 minutes. If I put a fan on, open the window, and work fast and get out of the room, I can get away with it. Frankly, I'd rather throw a few bucks at the problem and avoid the excitement.
The previously mentioned refillable cans might work (from HB). They didn't however, say whether they could be filled with air. I'll investigate.
Thanks, Bill
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Can you fill them with a meaningful amount of air only, or do you need to use a liquid to absorb the pressure? I'm reminded of my old "water filled rocket" (that one pumped up, and then released) that I had when I was a kid. It didn't work well with just air. Great fun for $.99 (yes, cents!).
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I don't know.
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Bill wrote:

out. Put air in and air comes out. It has a valve stem on the side just like a tire and you pump it up like a tire.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
  Click to see the full signature.
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If it doesn't work, a brush probably would.
Actually as I think it through... water is NOT compressible (or, only inconsequentially so).
Ed
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In this town Murphy is an optometrist
(Well, OK, he's an optician)
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Thanks for the suggestions, I'll try one of these refillable aerosal cans.
The manual says fillable to 90 psi. Think a normal manual bicycle pump will provide sufficient pressure?
Thanks, Bill
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Bill, Depends on the pump - a good floor pump will go past 110 psi without any trouble. Kerry
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That's what I was curious about. Thanks! Bill
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wrote:

(i.e. each press of the foot). Its cetainly better than a detergent bottle. It comes with 2 nozzles that restrict the airflow for a higher velocity.
http://www.target.com/Airhead-Bellows-Foot-Pump/dp/B000FE9CGE/sr=1-1/qid 32892611/ref=sr_1_1/184-2956600-9063142?ie=UTF8&index=target&rh=k%3Afoot%20pump&page=1
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wrote:

Not without knowing the application. Sometimes air from an inexpensive foot pump is all that's needed.

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