Compound slide miter saw questions


I recently moved. I had owned a Delta Unisaw at my last location, although I didn't get much chance to use it before relocating. I had to sell the Unisaw. I now have much less shop space. I would like to get back into woodworking, beginning with smaller projects, and am thinking one of the better sliding compound miter saws might be a good 1st saw for my smaller setup. I gather they have pretty much replaced radial arm saws, and that the good ones can cut 12 inches wide (more, for some) with very good accuracy. One question I have is, can you use a stacked dado blade in one of these? Most of these saws are 1" arbor, Freud does make a 10" 1" arbor dado set. Also, I am currently leaning toward the LS1214L 12" Dual Slide Compound Miter Saw with Laser. Anyone have other model suggestions to look at, or perhaps other saw types for a small shop? I'm looking for maximum versatility & accuracy in a relatively small package.
Thanks,
Dan
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Dan wrote:

To clarify, that's a Makita saw http://www.makita.com/menu.php?pg=product_det&tag=LS1214L
Dan
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Dan,
How are you going to cut sheet stock? I don't know how much space you have or the layout, but I would opt for one of the portable table saws that fold up and sit in the corner. Maybe in addition to a slider.
Bob

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bob wrote:

Thanks Bob. I am considering an inexpensive table saw in addition, but am starting with the CMS since it will do the 1st project, a design I have in mind for a glass table base.
Dan
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Hi Dan, I have never used or even seen a dado set on a SCMS. I think a router would be a better solution. I use a SCMS for 80-90% of my cuts. As to sheet goods, many suppliers will cut them to size and when they don't a circular saw with a shop made guide works well. I have a L1013 and think it is great. Cheers, JG

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JGS wrote:

JGS-Thanks for the reply. I had been thinking of the using a dado for a specific project where I wanted to use a half lap joint, but by coincidence I saw these demonstrated on a DIY network show yesterday http://www.beadlock.com/ I think now I'll go with a miter & beadlock or biscuits (no biscuit tool at the moment) at this location (table leg to top support). I think the beadlocks only go up to 1/2" (why?!?) and the stock I'm considering is 3/4, so I may have to spring for a biscuit cutter, or use screws from the side.
I do have a nice Hitachi plunge router. Should get a router table.
I understand the Festool (http://www.festoolusa.com /) and Smartguide (http://www.eurekazone.org/products/index.html ) are good commercial guides.
If anyone has any input on biscuit cutters, the saw guides or good router tables, please pass them on.
Dan
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Hi again Dan,
Some of the commercial guides are great. Many of us make our own by taking a 4' (or 8') piece of 1/4" plywood 3 or 4 inches wider then your circular saw. You then attach with screws a 1" X 1" very straight piece of wood (or in my case store bought at HD aluminum square tubing) to one side. Run you saw down the length holding it tight to the 1"X1". And Viola! a perfect guide for just a few dollars.
As to a biscuit joiner, I suggest you take a look at a Kreg jig instead. Below is something I posted on another newsgroup. Cheers, JG
Do you really need that type of joiner at all? This type of unit has been discussed many times on other groups and the result (added strength, alignment) of adding biscuits to a joint has been assessed in a few magazine tests. The executive summary of all of the above is, These units were designed to join sheet goods like plywood and particle board, not solid wood boards. They add no additional strength to a joint. However, they are a help in laying up a table top in that they can help with alignment if the unit cuts perfect slots and as long as the groove or biscuits are not telegraphed through to the surface. I have a semi pro shop and have not used mine in two years.

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JGS wrote:

Thanks for the reply. I've never used biscuits, seen them used on the woodworking shows, frankly I always did wonder if that thin piece of wood added much, other than perhaps a bit more glue area. I ordered a beadlock loose tenon system http://www.beadlock.com /. Certainly worth a try for the $$$.
Dan
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