Compound for filling cracks in wooden quoins (corner blocks)?

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Many of the wooden quoins (corner blocks) on our 1870's Italianate house have cracks and gaps in them.
I'm looking for a filler that would have the following properties: - Paintable - Sandable - Exterior grade - Able to withstand seasonal expansion/contraction cycles
Any suggestions?
I tried caulk, but it leaves a very messy result since it is not sandable and leaves a rough film
I tried woodfill but it doesn't seem to hold up to the expansion/contraction cycles
Thanks
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You probably used the wrong caulk .
For exterior fills such as you want use silicon caulk which is paintable.
After you pump the caulk into the cracks wet your finger and smooth the lumps down. If you apply the caulk with discretion you will not need a wet finger or sanding.
Be sure to read the labels as there is silicon caulk which is not paintable.
P D Q

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"blueman" wrote:

If you want a crack filler for wood, then epoxy and micro-balloons.
If you need a caulk, talk to SikaFlex tech service in Detroit (800#) for an industrial version of 291 used in marine work.
Lew
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I find that silicon caulks look even more caulk-like than the latex-based caulks and that they are harder to work. And since they are not workable or sandable after hardening, I don't know how you can get a seamless repair. But maybe I am missing something here...
I really want something that will look and behave like wood so it will fully blend in.

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PDQ wrote:
<snip>

..which is just about all of them. Even the ones listed at "paintable" don't hold paint well.
"Q: The kid at the do-it-yourself megastore sold me 100% silicon caulk. He said I could paint it, but the paint just crawls off. Now what?
A: We have heard this one more times than you would believe. NOTHING will EVER make 100% silicon caulk paintable. Not primer, not time, not crying or praying. All you can do is scrape it all out, then re-caulk with a painter's silconIZED acrylic caulk. And hope you don't have to buy a new trim package."
http://nicholasvillepaint.net/faq/faq.htm
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Interesting observation.
The only time I had silicon not take "paint" was when I tried to apply a stain first - dumb move.
I found the caulk did not like stain but still took to acrylic paint. I used the caulk to seal cracks between my windows and stone walls.
I have some caulking that is in need of replacement - it is almost 30 years old and the paint is still on it. Only problem is time has started to blacken the fills.
Who knows, maybe I was using painter's silconIZED acrylic caulk all along.
P D Q
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PDQ wrote:

You sure that you weren't using acrylic caulk with no silicone in sight all along?
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Not likely. I make a habit of only getting silicone as it gives me the best results.
P D Q
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message

Silicone is a homeowner's caulk, far as I'm concerned. There's limited use for the stuff other than in bathrooms and for very limited uses on the outside (vinyl windows to vinyl siding - and I'd still prefer the alternative). People use silicone because that's what they're familiar with. Polyurethane and polysulfide caulks provide superior results as anyone who uses caulk in a marine environment can attest. They're also more expensive, but that's the, ahem, price you pay.
R
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Must be you have one of those holes in the ocean into which one pours money. :)
P D Q
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"RicodJour" wrote:

Strictly the bottom of ther bucket stuff.

Absolutely.
IMHO, for the small amount spent on caulking for a project, avoiding silicone is a no-brainer.
Lew
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On Sun, 15 Jun 2008 21:47:08 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

Can you guys suggest some specific products for those of us who don't know this stuff?
As boring as a product like caulk is, I'm learning something here...
Thanks!
--------------------------------------------- ** http://www.bburke.com/woodworking.html ** ---------------------------------------------
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Yes, please. I second Barry's request!
B A R R Y wrote:

Yes, please. I second Barry's request!
Until now, I thought the options fer sealing cracks - forget painting over 'em - were silicon caulk and tar. (Ok, not entirely true, but close enough.)
Jason Buckler Marietta, GA
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Think it would work alright if you used the silicon caulk, and after applying added some sawdust on the outside? That way, the saw dust would be embedded in the caulk, and hopefully take paint. I think they actually use a similar process with teflon pans.
I realize it's definately a "the store's closed, and this has GOT to get done NOW" solutions.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

You could if you're truly desparate try <http://www.artmolds.com/index.cfm?u_cat 4&page=0>. No guarantees that it will work with any silcone other than the same company's casting materials though.
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This stuff works great.
http://tinyurl.com/5mqb6e
Max
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into plastic lid and squeeze in a thin 3/4 inch long line of hardener from the tube", this Minwax High Performance Wood Filler sounds similar to Bondo -- is it just a wood colored bondo or does it have properties better suited to wood repair?
Also, how does Minwax High Performance Wood Filler compare with epoxy products such as SystemThree Sculpwood or Abatron's WoodExpox?
Thanks
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Are the quoins painted or stained. Here's a sample of some patching I did. http://www.flickr.com/photos/mdinep /
Max
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Painted
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