Competition for SawStop ?

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On that note we should all close our eyes when we cross the streets since none of that stuff works anyway....LOL
Well, there was the kid who lost an eye to a splinter that somehow got past both the guard and the safety glasses . . .
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Ok, that sounds reasonable but only if you yourself start the experiment with the saw of your choice including the SawStop. which one are you going to choose......?
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wrote:

Mean cuss, ain't ya? Telling a consumer advocate to go maim himself. You ought to be ashamed of yourself, Leon.
I'd choose the saw which didn't have the asshole attorney attached to it, the Whirlwind licensed machine, of course.
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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And when you cut something off, some asshole attorney is going to be your painful best friend.
I'd buy the Sawstop too, except for one thing. A standard tablesaw is too high for me to safely use. The only option for me is the Access model General 650. Considering it cost as much or a little more than the Sawstop, the factor of money doesn't really come into play, not unless I'd be willing to spend some $10,000 or more for a computer controlled saw. And yes, I inquired if there was enough space inside the Sawstop cabinet to possibly lower the saw and there isn't, not even close. Not to mention the voiding of any warranty.
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Would it be possible to lower the saw into an elevated platform with gentle ramps? How much of a height difference are we talking about?
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On Fri, 21 Jan 2011 06:22:30 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

It's funny to see an post to me from someone who has been in my twit filter for several years now. What he doesn't realize is that good people don't need nor use attorneys for self-inflicted wounds. They take responsibility for their actions, unlike the liberal idiots in Uppy's small circle.

A wheelchair-height workspace is usually 24-26", so lowering would probably be about 10 inches.
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On 1/21/2011 10:00 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

For the amounts of money you are talking about, would raising the floor 10 inches around and in the vicinity of the saw be unthinkable? Or, IIRC, are you working in a smallish interior room?
Bill

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You're talking about a much larger area. It would be a number of feet around the saw to accomodate the wheelchair rolling safetly around the saw and not unwittingly going over an edge. I'd suggest that a safe zone would be in excess of 200' square feet. An average wheelchair requires an approximate minimum of 5 feet for a turning radius. So, think of a five foot wide border around a saw. Add onto that infeed and outfeed tables and the space needed grows exponentionally.
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On 1/21/2011 11:23 AM, Upscale wrote:

Yes, but I would not leave an edge. You seem to be working well with a benchtop TS, no? I commend you for your devotion to the craft.
Bill
I'd suggest that a safe zone would be in

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When needed, I use a contractors saw that resides in a friend's garage. I trimmed about 5" off the legs of the saw after I wound up in the wheelchair. It's not perfect, but it does fine with the aftermarket Excalibur saw guide I added to it.
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says...

He's been over this before--in a word no, it won't work for him. Think about it--you're on the raised floor, there's something you need that's three feet away, but you have to go down the ramp in the opposite direction and then wheel around to it to get it. Not to mention having to have railings on the raised area to keep from accidentally rolling off and mangling yourself . . .
If the whole shop floor could be raised it would likely be another story, but then headroom for people who are not in chairs (or just for handling stock) could be an issue.
It occurs to me though that a rather baroque but workable approach, if a pit can be made for the saw, is to make the pit with a jacking mechanism so that the saw can be lowered into it at need and lifted to be rolled off on its mobile base when it's not needed, and the jacking mechanism would raise the floor to level when the saw is not in use. The details would require either a commercial product of some sort (I can't even think of good keywords for such a thing) or the services of an engineer to design the thing.
It occurse to me that it could probably be cobbled with some threaded rod, sprockets and chain (or cog belt), appropriate structural members, and a crank, essentially making a huge router lift. If you wanted to get fancy it could probably be motorized.
Probably wouldn't be cheap but should be _doable_. I suspect that McMaster can provide all the parts you need that aren't Home Depot or hardware-store items.
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On 1/21/11 11:56 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

Remember, he also doesn't have a traditional shop space either.
--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
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On 1/21/2011 11:56 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

If it was a 20 by 24 foot garage like I have now, it may be plausable. If fact, entering from the kitchen, where there are currently two steps, and you would already be 12 inches above the ground (concrete). Reducing from 8.5 feet leaves enough head space for everyone else, as far as I would be concerned. Doesn't seem as thought the price would be exorbitant. May as well thread a bunch of wires underneath, at the same time, for convenient electrical.
Bill
Not to mention having

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It all boils down to feeling comfortable and safe when using your equipment. *Anything* is doable if one is willing to put up with some aggravations. For me, a raised floor is not one of those things. It's been considered and discarded as being too problematic, especially when there is an excellent quality lowered saw already available on the market. Unfortunately, that's not a Sawstop. Maybe some time in the future with additional technology, patents expiring, etcetera, a Sawstop add-on might become available. Until then, I'll be careful with the tools that don't make me feel excessively nervous to use.
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wrote in message

Good attitude. If it doesn't feel safe, don't do it. You retain many more body parts that way.
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The raised floor is a great way to lose dust collector ducting...and other wires and airlines etc...and storage too. There are some up-sides to this idea... but I DO get your apprehension.
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To Upscale, I apologize if you are already aware of or using this solution, but you know, it would be easy to modify a conventional style contractor saw to be 10 or 12 inches lower.
--
Make it as simple as possible, but not simpler. (Albert Einstein)

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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No need to apologize Larry. You're just offering up possible solutions. The fact that it's been discussed before is irrelevent. Sooner or later, someone will come up with a solution or suggestion that hasn't been mentioned before. Even the General Tools lowered Access line of tools has only been on the market for three years and that was only because I contacted them to see what modifications could be done to one of their tablesaws.

Contractor's saw already modified and in use. Someday, I'll find a suitable and accessible workshop to share or rent and then I'll be off to buy a lowered cabinet saw before you can blink.
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It would be possible with ramps as I've talked about previously, but it would be a ramp for the saw only. Ramps in themselves are inherently dangerous for wheelchairs because they contribute to a change of balance and equilibrium while you're using them. I'd be much more likely to tip my wheelchair and break a leg or something while going up or down a ramp than I would ever be cutting a finger off with a tablesaw. And in this case, we're talking about a 6"-8" difference needed for a ramp to equalize the difference between a standard height Sawstop and an Access model General 650.
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wrote in message

How so?
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