Comparison between Veritas and LieNielsen hand planes?

All,
I am about to embark upon a new stage in my woodworking. The investment in hand planes.
I am curious as to what is the difference between the veritas and Lie Nielsen products. I have heard good things from guys who use both, but i have not seen any comparison of the two.
Any imput would be great.
Thanks in advance,
Grampa Simpson
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On Fri, 5 Dec 2003 06:51:14 -0800, "grampa simpson"
Veritas - more bang for the buck
Lie Nielsen - your only source for that obscure discontinued Stanley.
Clifton - don't make many models, but I prefer them to the Lie-Nielsen
When it's down to a head-to-head (like the #112), I'd choose the Veritas.
On the whole though, you'll get a lot more finding re-usables off eBay.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 15:54:58 +0000, Andy Dingley

I've bought several WWII or before era, user-quality, non-collectible, Stanleys for less than $30 each. Some were in the $20 range. Adding a Hock or LN iron and an hour or so's labor gave me several great planes for $50-60 or so each.
I sprung for a new Veritas low-angle block, as I couldn't seem to nail a low angle block down used for a decent price on eBay. I _really_ like the Veritas LA plane. I'd buy another in an instant.
Barry
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"grampa simpson" wrote ...

I have Lie Nielsen products but no Lee Valley planes as yet (although I am planning buying their new shoulder plane). With that out of the way, the answer first depends on which planes you are talking about - I will assume, however, you mean the bench planes. The Lie Nielsen bench planes are patterned off the Stanley Bedrock line that was discontinued decades ago. This line has generally been touted as the cream of Stanley's crop. In comparison, the Lee Valley bench planes are redesigned to some degree and are somewhat unique. Unfortunately, having a boat load of antique Stanley's myself, I have no need to purchase a Lee Valley plane even though I would like to try one out. As far as use goes, as I said I have no experience with the Lee Valley products but I find that the Lie Nielsen planes don't cut wood any better than my antique Stanley planes (either Bedrock or Bailey pattern) when they are tuned properly. The LN planes are purty though.
--
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Howard
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I'll add my vote for older Stanleys. I have a selection of WWII era bench planes that I've picked up at fleas and estate sales. The nost I've paid was $50 for a #4 1/2 ..3's 4's 5's & 6's $10 to $17 each. #7 & #8 $25 each. Sure, they needed a little work but then that's half the fun. Sharpen them up, true up the sole and clean off the grunge and you have a user you can be proud of. And in the process of tunig it up you'll get a working knowledge of how the plane works. I tend to go for the WWII stuff because they usually have a heavier casting..even though they skimped on some of the other features. One thing I do know for certain, once you start with hand planes, you're hooked. pretty soon you end up building shelves to hold all of the heavy metal that just happens to follow you home. The upside is that there's less dust in your shop and your lungs and you really get an upper body workout truing up a tabletop. If you have the extra $$ by all means go for the LN..they're beautiful and work right out of the box..same with the LV's but I will guarantee that you'll be searching out some of the old rust sooner than you think.
walt q in Connecticut an old tool and proud of it!
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walt wrote:

I got a good chuckle out of that statement. Exactly where I sit today, and I only have two planes so far. (So far... :) I keep moving them, from workbench to saw top to router to workbench to floor... Wherever I'm not working. I need to give those babies a nice, spiffy home.
Wall space and bench space are at a premium though, and I haven't yet come up with a good idea. Maybe build a cabinet on the back wall to hold my portable power tools, then give the shelf under the workbench over to a nice compartmentalized plane box. Put some light bulbs in it to stave off rust year-round maybe.
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