Compact Flourescent Lamps

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Pat Barber wrote:

Exactly. A certain percentage of any electronic component will suffer "infant mortality" (google "bathtub curve" for more information on the statistical pattern) but with an LED array the failure of a few individual LEDs doesn't have any significant effect on function.

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Pat Barber wrote:

They've been GREAT here in CT. I'd say we've had them for at least 7-8 years. Did NC pick a crappy supplier?
Also, almost all new aircraft lighting is LED. We replaced our tail "bubble gum machine" last year with an LED strobe. It wasn't cheap, but the performance is terrific.
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We are talking about state government here... (lowest bidder)
B A R R Y wrote:

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We just did a major remodel on our house, garage door openers too. He asked if we had any lamps, he'd put em in while he was up there. Handed him a CFL, he said these were great for places with vibration. Much better then incandescent.
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"Rick Samuel" wrote:

Basic problem with a CFL is that it requires "warm up" time which makes it a poor choice for fast response On-Off application like garage door operators.
Better to use a "Rough Service" incandescent lamp.
To qualify as a "rough service" lamp, increase the filament voltage by say 10% which is exactly what a traffic signal lamp is.(130V vs 120V)
Available at any decent electrical distributor.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Different ones behave differently in this regard. I have some CFLs that take a minute to come up to full brightness, and others that come up to near-full-brightness in about a second.
Interestingly, the more expensive ones weren't always better.
Chris
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Even on 10F temps, mine throws enough light to get in and out of the car, as well as park the car. It's noticeable but plenty livable.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Here in AZ, even in the winter, I'm not sure that will be a problem. Hasn't been thus far when using the CFL's as porch lights.

I've got those in the GDO, my thought was that, in this one case, I might actually be able to get 60 watts or more of theoretical light from a fixture that specifies the need for low wattage.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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"Mark & Juanita" wrote:

At 1,000 ft, a flying red horse won't see the difference.
Lew
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No slow warm up, they come on about a 1/2 second after the button is pushed. May be different in winter, but winter is mild in the TX Hill Country.
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A couple of problems with a florescent is that they do flicker and they can at a quick glance make certain tools appear to not be turning. If you think your saw blade is not turning you might have an accident. This may be more of a problem with a VS DP or Lathe and if you cannot hear the machine running. Have you ever noticed how a drill chuck seems to spin backwards stop and go forward as you raise and lower the speed when using florescent lighting? As the speed of the chuck goes into and out of phase with the cycles of the lamp the chuck can appear to be turning at a different speed or direction. Another problem is many are very slow to come up to full brightness, cold makes this situation worse. I currently have 6 florescent flood lights in my home and all take up to 20 - 40 seconds to put out any usable light and they are comparable to a 65 watt spot.
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CFLS? I thought the flicker frequency was in kHz range, undetectable.

Takes my eyes at least that long to focus, so no problem. Note that the Lexan-encased PAR floods with the CFL tubes inside offer a solution to the leakage of the trace of mercury should the tube break.
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wrote in message>>

In many cases it is undetectable but as a bulb begins to go bad and or the ballast goes bad the flicker can be more evident. I was at a friends house a few months ago and and the 24" florescent fixture on the ceiling in the laundry room made you feel like you were in a Disco, it was nauseating.
Additionally the flicker is normally hard to see until you compare it to something turning slightly out of phase with the kHz. I have some "dimmable" floresent spot lights in track lighting and when they begin to go bad they put on a light show.

Good to know, is that for all brands or a particular brand?
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T12s flicker at line frequency. Narrower tubes turn on and off at higher frequencies, same as how the thinner high E string on a guitar sounds higher than the bass E.

Cheapest works fine for me.
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On Sat, 9 Aug 2008 05:10:49 -0600, Rick Samuel wrote

In my experience, their lifespan is roughly the same as incandescents. This seems to follow for cheap/expensive and their on/off duty cycle.
-Bruce

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wrote:

The distribution of the light may not be as good with the CFLs in the porcelain fixtures. With the 4' or 8' fluorescent tubes the light is very well distributed. Last winter I put in about 40 4' 2 bulb fluorescent lights into the basement. Each fixture is about a foot or so from the next in a row with about 6 feet between rows. Used the cheap bulbs because I could not justify the 4 times cost for the nice bulbs. Lots of light everywhere in the basement with no spots much brighter than others. Very even distribution of light. Maybe wth very high ceilings the porcelain fixtures with CFLs would have an opportunity to disperse the light well enough. Or you could have bright spots and dark spots in the room.
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On Sat, 09 Aug 2008 14:10:49 +0300, Rick Samuel wrote:

Be careful with the term "full spectrum". It is a misleading marketing term used to advertise many bulbs that are far short of better light.
Technically, CRI (Color Rendering Index) is the accuracy with which a light matches it's reference, usually daylight. No bulb less than 90 should be called "full spectrum", although many are. (A quick search finds numerous examples with CRI of 75!)
In short: use bulbs >95 CRI and temperature 5,000-5,5000K for the fullest and most accurate range of light in the same band as daylight.
--
Steve Hall [ digitect dancingpaper com ]

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