Color me DUMB!

Page 1 of 2  

Bought a cheap drum sanding kit from ebay some months ago. Four drums and lots of sanding tubes to use on my bench drill. Worked OK but some of the tubes just would not fit well on the little drums - some too big others too small. So I've been taping up the too small barrels to stop the tubes slipping. Hey - it only cost a few bucks. Today I need the smallest drum radius and I can't get any of the smallest tubes to slip over. In frustration I thought I'd take the drum off so I see this little nut at the bottom of the drum on the shaft. I turn it counter-clockwise (universal loosen, right?) and what the hell - it doesn't loosen - it tightens up and the drum gets fatter! And the nut is reverse threaded so when I turn it clockwise, it loosens and the drum gets smaller.
Nobody ever told me you could make the drums bigger and smaller with this nut thereby making it easier to get the tubes off and on! DOH!
FoggyTown
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Now somehow I knew about that but since I can't tell left from right I never get the drums on or off or to stay in place with out a lot of fussing around just the same. Doh!
Josie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can't add to this bunch. I never made a mistake>>>>>>> But then again I may be mistaken about that. (<:)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm not going to snicker at your expense as I have encountered similar thing where I DOH!'ed. My first sanding drum was a 3 1/2" SandBoss pneumatic. I slipped on the sleeve and hooked up the air chuck. It clearly said not to exceed 35 psi..'cept I hadn't read that part. I figure it blew at about 80 psi.. nothing really loud.. just expensive. Later I found out they were repairable by buying a new tube... then I had two 3 1/2" drums... till I was sanding against the grain on the edge of an oak board driving a nice sliver into the sleeve and tube... just a hiss that time.... as you can see.. I have absolutely no right to laugh at your misfortune, funny as it is.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Haven't we all done something DOH! once in awhile. Mine was six months ago when unbeknownst to me, my cordless drill slipped into reverse. Spent over two hours trying to figure out why none of my new drills bits wouldn't drill for shit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Upscale wrote:

Oh sure. DOHness is an elemental part of wrecking. I am especially proud of the time I spent at least an hour lovingly machining and sanding a decorative figured stretcher for a side table - and then glued it up backwards AND upside down. I didn't notice it until the next day at which point I discovered that the glue was indeed stronger than the wood.
FoggyTown
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep! Friend asked me to fix a back porch light sensor that was coming on too much for too short a time, burning out the bulb. Took it down and working @ odd moments in the basement, spent some time on it, was about to get a new sensor assy. when it wouldn't work. Then . . . DOH! You jacka**! It won't work with the lights on, it's designed to work in the DARK!
--
Nahmie
The greatest headaches are those we cause ourselves.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

too
@
Reminds me of back in the DOS days. Installed a new cdrom drive and then wrote up a DOS batch file so I could play some music cds. Named it cd.bat. Spent the next three days trying to figure out why when I typed 'cd' <enter> my batch file wouldn't work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I know a guy who had a pretty smooth database and output designed back in the DOS days, only to run up against an unanticipated glitch in the payroll program when it refused to compute and issue compensation to a guy whose last name was " Blank...."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My personal favorite is ripping large expensive sheets of plywood and measuring correctly and marking incorrectly. I have done that twice in the same day.
foggytown wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pat Barber wrote:

You just kind of have to accept that you're going to do that once in a while. Just the other day, I was repeating "seventy eight and seven eighths...seventy eight and seven eighth...seventy eight and seven eighths..." in my head and promptly marked 78 3/8 and made the cut. AAAAARRRRRRGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHH!!!!!! That's a long piece of hardwood to scrap! I'm a newbie so I had to learn butt joinery on the spot.
BTW, I'm going to have to learn to be less vocal when I screw up. My wife came running out of the house assuming that I'd cut off a body part!
Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9 Sep 2005 09:38:17 -0700, tom snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

You get over the screaming pretty soon. If you make as many mistakes as I do it makes your throat hurt too much.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
During the 70s gasoline crunch, I decided to move a couple of gallons from one vehicle to another. I walked into the garage and picked up a cheap electric pump that I had. I walked back outside and held the cord in my hand for a few seconds. I returned to the garage, put the pump back from which it had come, went into the house, poured a beer and rested until my heart quit racing.     glurp,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That reminds me of when I had my '67 T-bird. Middle of winter went out, started up the car, turned the heat on full, went back in the house to wait for it to warm up. Woke up on the couch 8 hours later. The car was still running with all the snow melted for five feet around it, 3/4's of a tank of gas used up. Car never ran properly after that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Upscale wrote:

A buddy of mine rebuilt/restored a '62 Corvette. He had finished, it was a true work of art. It was late on a Sunday afternoon (this was quite a few years ago) and all the auto places were closed. He wanted to try out the car, filled the radiator with water (no anti-freeze) and went for a test drive. Beautiful. He parked the car in his (NY) driveway and returned to the house. The temp dropped that night badly. So badly that when he returned to the car the next day he had a cracked block. DOH!
Glen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I do that so often I don't even count it anymore. My favorite was installing the chain on my chain saw backwards. At the time I was cutting and selling firewood, so having it suddenly stop cutting was rather disconcerting. More so was when I finally figured out the problem after re-sharpening the chain - *twice*!
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bought a new chainsaw a little over a year ago, display unit, fully assembled. Jonsered, nice little 16" saw.
Took me about half an hour of trying to cut through 2/" branches with little success before I thought to check whether the chain was on backwards or not in the store.
Guess what?
djb
--
"Usenet is like a herd of performing elephants with diarrhea -- massive,
difficult to redirect, awe-inspiring, entertaining, and a source of
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

BTDT, isn't that the most frustrating thing? I usually figure it out when I go to throw the drill in reverse in order to change the bit, and have a little 'a ha!' moment.
One of my scarier 'color me dumb' moments was using a brass template guide on my router for the first time. Pretty, shiny new 4" long, 1/2" Whiteside spiral upcut bit, and I picked the 5/8" guide... the one with a 17/32" ID. Hindsight tells me that only leaves 1/64" clearance all around the bit.
Now, the moment itself is a bit of a blur, but what I think happened is that the upcut bit, true to its name, lifted a freshly routed and liberated chip of wood that happened to be more than 1/64" thick. Said chip of wood (part of a knot in some pine IIRC) was thick enough to deflect the bit into the template guide, at which time there was an awful CHUNK sound, my router motor briefly stopped whizzing around and jerked violently in my hands, bits of wood, brass and carbide hit my face shield, and my heart stopped. Obviously, none of that is necessarily in chronological order.
Thankfully, the router, the bit and myself survived (mostly). The bit has a tiny nick on only one of its helical edges, so it still works great. The brass template... not so much. You can still sorta tell that it once had a round opening, but about 1/3 of it looks like it was torn and peeled back much like a cereal box top. The end grain of the wood I was routing got a little torn up, and needed nothing more than the tiniest dab of wood filler to fix. It is now the shorter stile in my first full-size door, and would make a great conversation piece if I didn't have to crowd people around it when I tell the story... it is a bathroom door.
-John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[snipperectomy]

My shop runs on 1/2" bits inside 5/8 guides. That's how I shape my slabs for solid surface fabrication. I always use single-flute bits, better chip clearing and faster/cooler cutting. They do vibrate a little after a couple of sharpenings, but we're not making watches.
The one day I grabbed a router body with a spiral 1/2" and dropped into a base already set up with a 5/8 bushing. Too much in a hurry to change to the single flute, the acrylic went up into the bushing and seized inside the bushing and the whole bushing started rotating, smoking, and ruined the router base-plate.
Like a sign in my office says: "The hurryder I go, the behinder I get."
hangs beside: "You want this tomorrow?? You should have ordered it tomorrow!"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I always knew about this, but I had the other problem. No matter how much I made them thinner, I could not get the worn cyliders off. So I ripped them off, and I was never able to get new ones one. They WERE cheap. I think I got them from AMT (the Harbor Freight of the 80's... :-) They worked for the first week, but that was 20 years ago.
--
Sending unsolicited commercial e-mail to this account incurs a fee of
$500 per message, and acknowledges the legality of this contract.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.