Coating an oak table top with epoxy.


I need some ideas on how best to create a dam around the edge of the table. I have already put an edge on it, I used a 1/2" round over, leaving a 3/32 edge at the top. I wish to use the pourable epoxy but I don't want to let it run over the edges. The edge I will finish seperately. Any Ideas?
--
Handyman


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Are you sure you need it? Have you tried? I think that most of the products such as Mirrorcoat sold by woodcraft are designed to use the surface tension of the piece to prevent the epoxy from running over the edge. This assumes that the epoxy is mixed to the correct viscosity, but I don't think it is terribly difficult. I would try it on a mock up made of scrap.
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RE: Subject
1)Epoxy does not bond well to white oak.
2) If this is an outdoor table, epoxy has no UV resistance.
Lew
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wrote:

Although it's a problem for structural glueups, I'd expect it to bond well enough for this sort of surface coating. I've used filled epoxies successfully for hiding knots or crack filling.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

As soon as you fill the epoxy, it is a whole new ball in play.
Filling cracks and covering knots as above should work quite well.
Lew
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I don't think so. Unless he uses exactly the correct amount and the top is exactly level it will overflow. As it does not stick to plastic, if I were to try it again, I would rim the top with a heavy plastic coated tape. I had a big problem with improper mixing. So now I pour part A and B together and mix. Pour this into another container ( scraping the sides) and mix again. Then pour it back into the first container and mix again. You have to move quickly. And then pour on to the substrate. I then use a propane torch to break the bubbles. Good luck, JG
woodworker88 wrote:

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On Fri, 3 Jun 2005 02:25:43 +0100, Handyman

Mylar (polyester sheet) as a release layer, then a vertical wall of MDF to support it. Screw or clamp it in place as needed.
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Handyman wrote:

Plumber's Putty.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Masking tape with the right amount exposed over the lip might do it too. Just make sure that the stiffness of the paper isn't overwhelmed by the epoxy.
Michael
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I've used a one part epoxy called "POXY COAT". It is approved for food. I originally used it on a cider press.
No need to flood, just put a coulple coats on. I've had a red oak table outside in SE MI for 3 years no with no problems.
Dave
SD: No affiliation with poxy coat
Handyman wrote:

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You should let it flow over the edge. You can sand the drips off later. Check out http://www.eti-usa.com/consum/envtex/protips.htm .
Preston

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