Coarse Thread Pocket Screws for Melamine Construction?

Greetings!
I am building some cabinets out of melamine and would rather not invest in a Confirmat step bit and screws if I don't have to. Would coarse thread pocket screws be an adequate substitute?
I would use these with Gorilla glue. Additionally, would I be better off routing the coating off the melamine so it is wood fiber glued to wood fiber or does it not matter, i.e., would the glue bond the ripped edge of the melamine just as well to the slick surface as the substrate?
Thanks for your input,
D'ohBoy
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Depends on the use of the cabinets but I doubt pocket screws would work. They would probably just pull right through as you tightened them. Have you looked here: http://www.mcfeelys.com/product/5040-CSP-A/5-x-40mm-Connecting-Screw-Starter-Kit
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I've worked quite a large number of projects in melamine board. I do not recommend your technique of coarse threaded screws even with shaving off the plastic to bare the substrate. If you want to use threaded fasteners, Confirmat screws should be used. This is IMHO. Joe G snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Call the boys at Mcfeely's and ask them. They sell a screw that is suitable for melamine... A pocket hole screw will work, but is a weak joint in melamine.
THe screws I used were 2.5" long and will hold a butt joint nice and tight.
Watch melamine close to the ends. You MUST pre-drill to prevent splitting.
I can't remember the name of that screw.
Confirmats are the best but these work pretty well.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Found it... http://www.mcfeelys.com/product/0820-FSL /
They are 2" not 2.5"....
Pat Barber wrote:

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In article

Why not just use McFeely's Confirmat style screws?
<http://www.mcfeelys.com/tech/confirmat.asp
--
Hank Gillette

To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are
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This was pretty old article but I recall the original guy "not" wanting to use confirmats due to cost.
Confirmat's require a pretty pricey drill bit and if your screwing skills are not excellent, you can screw up the holes.
Using the more traditional screws would be easier for a novice to use in my opinion.
All you need is coutersink bit and a screw driver.
Hank Gillette wrote:

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On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 18:29:48 GMT, Pat Barber

I doubt there's a man among us who would admit to having less than excellent screwing skills...
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Errrr..true
I should have said "drilling skills"...
I got to get these bi-focals swapped out.
Bill wrote:

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Which is why I suggested the McFeely's Confirmat style. Rockler sells Confirmat screws 8 for $2.09. McFeely's copies are $7.53 for a 100, which doesn't seem prohibitive to me, especially if the Confirmat style screw is as much better for particle board as claimed.

I was surprised at the price of the drill bit, but Rockler, who sells the genuine Confirmat simply says that they need a 7/32" pilot hole.
Still, it seems better to use the proper tool for the job and learn the skills needed to use it than to compromise on something that won't hold up.
--
Hank Gillette

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sounds sketchy to me, but the only way to tell if it'll work for your application is to mock up the joint with some scrap and test it to destruction. I predict it'll be very easy to destroy.
I generally try to use a screw that goes all of the way through for locations where I can put the head in a non-visible place, and a biscuit where I have to show the face.
use melamine glue, not gorilla glue. it's a lot stronger for your application, and a lot cheaper.
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Around here a lot of people use 2" particle board screws and no glue when building kitchen cabinets. Some use pan heads others don't. You have to predrilled and the holes are about 4" apart. JG

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This post is a slightly off topic but it might interest a few in the group. Melamine board developed by necessity in Germany right after WWll ended. Germany was in ruins as a consequence of the allied bombing raids. There was very little wood available to begin reconstruction. There was however a great deal of destroyed wooden material at hand and a process was developed to grind the available wood into chips suitable for rolling into sheet goods using formaldehyde glue as a binder. Plastic sheets were adhered to the outside surfaces to provide a finish as the substrate was not conducive to traditional finishing techniques. The German hardware industry developed the 32 mm system with catalogs full of specialized screws, hinges, drawer slides, connectors et al to work with the particular properties of the new board. Therefore the confirmat screw.
Joe G
On Jan 23, 2:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Very interesting and I often wondered where the 32mm started and why.
I just thought the germans wanteed to be different or they had found some deep dark reason for all that hole spacing.
GROVER wrote:

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In answer to Pat, This part of the melamine story might be apocryphal but I pass it along anyway. You can research it and make up your own minds. The reason the Germans chose 32mm was that it was the centerline to centerline distance of the only pair of matching gears they had. These gears formed the basis of the gang drill which permited multiple system holes to be drilled simoltaneously. Joe G

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Yeah, and I have a pterodactyl as a pet.

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What does your pterodactyl eat?

message
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On Jan 23, 2:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

When I build cabinets, I don't use glue and use 2 or 2.5 inch particle board screws. All holes must be predrilled and awy from the edge. Havent had a problem so far.
Jim
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