Coarse/Fine Drywall Screw Threads


Just curious as to the trade-offs between these 2 DW screw types. The coarse thread seem much faster when putting together something, but I wonder what I am giving up.
I know that real wood screws are better, but sometimes a DW will suffice. Thanks.
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Strength is what you give up when using any dry wall screw except when hanging sheet rock.
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Leon wrote:

You know everyone says that they're really brittle, but I've never snapped or broken a drywall screw. In my experience the driver head cams out first.
I believe there is a place for drywall screws with sheet goods, as the threads are sharper and finer than most wood screws, which seems to leave more material to grip the screw. I built a really crude set of shelves to support my home theater receiver, VCR, DVD player, etc. using MDF and butt joints with drywall screws. No glue even. So far it's held up for about 5 years.
Chris
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They are brittle and made to go into soft construction grade material. I discovered dry wall screw in the late 70's and broke plenty. Caming out is a problem also and it typically is the only thing that protects the screw from breaking.

Lots of people get the same results with the cheapo plastic bagged screws offered at the Borg. Proper screws bought in quantity are inexpensive. Why not use the correct screw?
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"Leon" wrote in message

And I, for one, won't be buying any more Rockler screws ...
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Arguably, anyone shopping at Rockler gets screwed....
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I always felt that way however now that there is a store in Houston I get all kinds of 25% off coupons and their sales tend to be pretty good. The Quart TiteBond III for $6.99 is a good deal and 1/2 off all screws including Kreg is not bad. I have never bought their house brand screws, I only use McFeeley unless I buy Kreg.
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I believe the fine thread DW screws are for steel studs.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

look at what it says on the boxes. They all say that fine threads are for steel studs and coarse threads are meant for wood.
using DW screws for wood, one would best use coarse threads, especially for soft woods, but fine threads seem ok for hard woods. (Note my use of hard and soft here mean density not type of tree)
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On Sun, 21 May 2006 13:12:21 -0400, "Buck Turgidson"

Course thread is better for soft woods. Fine thread requires more turns, less force, to drive them home.
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I assume you're talking the generic, rather than actual drywall screws. Most all of the newer screws follow the pattern of what originally arrived on the scene as drywall screws.
Finer threads for denser material, as indicated, but flake and chipboard are something else. .
Big disadvantage to the actual drywall screw is that it lacks a smooth shank to pull up the piece being attached, a shortcoming which can even overcome a careless clamp job. This shank is also where they pick up what seems, in the main, to be a bad rap about breaking off. You can actually bend non-drywall types now, so the smaller section under the head versus the old style screw is less of a snap factor.
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Buck Turgidson wrote:

I've always found that coarse drywall screws break coarsely and fine drywall screws break finely.
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