cnc routing and cutting

i watched some videos on cnc cutting and routing
anyone here have a cnc setup in their shop i wonder how many tools could a cnc replace seems to me you could replace a lot if you were just making cabinets
one video showed a diy guy making the cnc bed himself from square tubes
i did not see what kind of machine he mounted yet as this video was just on the construction of the bed
one video i watched played music instead of the sound
it looked like they were doing the complete routing and drilling and cutting of kitchen cabinets
for the cutting do they use vacuum to hold the pieces or something else
it seems a vacuum would be the best and simplest
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What makes you think anyone cares?

I'm sure a simple search of the Laguna website would answer all your questions. Concentrate specifically on the CNC machines.
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The thing with CNC is that it depends on what you want to do. For some processes, putting the burdeon of cutting and measuring on the machine is the way to go. For other processes, the manual way will still be much faster.
It quickly becomes a matter of trade offs. CNC requires time to tell the machine what to do, but once having been told what to do can keep doing it all day. One offs like we build in our shops won't benefit much from CNC.
There is no best way of holding all stock. That's why vises, clamps (of many different styles) and vacuum tables all exist.
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 12/1/2015 2:59 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Yep, and it can also take the "man" out of craftsman if not used judiciously.
Tom Plamann, one of the finest woodworkers that posted here in the past, widely known for his astounding carved and ornate stair cases, fireplaces, and boat and plane interiors for the 1%, was roundly taken to task by a client when he started using cnc for some of his work. IIRC, it ended up costing him some business.
The client's remark: I'm paying for your artistry and craftsmanship, not something from a machine.
https://woodworkingweb.com/creations/471-fireplace-mantel
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On 2015-12-03 11:40 AM, Swingman wrote:

for signs, shelves and the like. I have a shelf he made for me on his CNC, got it just a couple months before he passed away.
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On 12/3/2015 12:17 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

Miss him. Seeing Angela on FaceBook a few times a week keeps him in mind.
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On 2015-12-03 3:12 PM, Swingman wrote:

last thing he made, or very close to it.
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On 12/3/2015 11:40 AM, Swingman wrote:

Exactly. Machines make everything perfect, every time, all the time. People not so much. When you want something custom made, you should expect two things, imperfections, and expensive.
The more handmade something is, the more imperfections you can expect, and the more money you can expect to spend, and of course, the more unique the piece will be.
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On Thu, 3 Dec 2015 10:40:04 -0600

cnc for airplane/boat interiors makes sense they are a lot different than a 2x4 structure i notice he no longer works for the airplane company but does church projects no doubt much more enjoyable his fireplace corbels are real nice
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On 01 Dec 2015 20:59:05 GMT Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

in a video a cnc cabinet mill advertises 24 to 48 hours from order to delivery they showed the cnc stuff plus the custom stuff so yes even they keep some conventional tools around despite being mostly a cnc factory

if i was setting up a new shop i would strongly consider a cnc but they are not cheap but i see a lot of upside
safety reproducability simplicity as some tools would not be needed precision and accuracy completely new possibilities
downsides are expense new thinking required so a bit of some time to learn new things computers become involved

depends on the work piece i guess
the diy guy had a vertical face on his cnc base which is a good idea this way he can clamp legs or corbels etc
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replying to Electric Comet , Wadkin wrote:

A CNC router can perform any operation at all ! The key is spec'ing it up correctly for YOUR own needs.
you can mount to a Cnc router :
3 axis of movement 5 axis of movement Lathe stock endless rotation clamps Occilating or static knives Tapping heads Printing heads Creasing heads Drilling heads Multi rip heads Milling heads Robotic loading Vacuum panel lifters Automatic loading and unloading of entire sheets Router cutters Saw blades Aggregate head (to change angle of cut from vertical) Automatic tool changers Vacum clamps Phneumatic clamps Manual clamps Vacuumed matrix beds Dual table / loading zones Sanding heads Edge banding heads for internal/ external lipping Automatic nesting software Optimising software Wireless controllers
The list goes on and on and on
With a correct setup you could replace every machine with one Cnc machine but at least dramatically reduce the quality
For example on the one machine for cutting kitchen carcasses you would cut the panels drill all pilot holes for assembly,dowel holes, hinge holes, shelf pegs holes, grove for the back panel all at the same time while saving waste due to maximising yield of panel with nesting with finished quality from one machine no need to de burr or sand due to high quality finish
For more info on cncs ranging from bench mounted cncs routers all the way to 30m Giants have a look at www.daltonswadkin.com
The Technology is out there.... Let's use it
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On Wed, 02 Dec 2015 19:44:02 +0000

that is amazing now i understand why they are so prominent on lagunatools

not sure what you mean are you saying that the quality will suffer with the cnc equivalent of the conventional machine

one video was exactly this

looks good

cost is an issue for many i think but the diy guy built his own bed so maybe he save some $$ that way
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replying to Electric Comet , Wadkin wrote:

Auto correct mistake there mant to say quantity I.e amount of machines in workshop.
The quality is more often better than traditional methods but this is all down to the tooling and programming skill of operator in control
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On Thu, 03 Dec 2015 04:44:01 +0000

right that makes sense if i was starting from scratch i would take a good hard look at a cnc
safer better reproducibility seems like dust control would be simpler and better
all around it would reduce shop complexity and in the long run would be much cheaper

from reading about them it seems there is some new knowledge that is needed but once you get the machine calbirated for the tasks and you know the critical settings you can get consistent results
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