Cleaning up planer marks?

My local high school was kind enough to let me use their 18" planer on some 17" panels. The shop teacher warned me the blades were "nicked up a bit". Well, the wood came out looking like it had falling out of a speeding car. It took me a very long time to clean up with 80grit in a ROS; every time I thought I was done and went to finer grit I saw the marks were still there.
Is there a better way to go about this? I never use my belt sander on anything other than rough carpentry, but I was tempted.
Thanks.
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Hand plane, cabinet scraper. Belt sander? I'd rather use my teeth!
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Mike G.
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I guess I have to learn to use a hand plane some day. What size/kind would be appropriate?
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Personal preference to a large degree. I'd grab my #4, but that's my favorite tool. Any smoother or bench plane will get you through the current problem as long as the panel is still acceptably flat after the beating it took at the school and the cleanup sanding. If I was flattening it, I would probably get out my #6, but IMO that's not a great starter plane.
Dave R.
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wrote:

I have a planer with a couple of nicks. I use a #4 plane to clean it up in a pass or two if the wood's too wide to run through the planer again on a different path.
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Far from me to buck a trend, I concur with the consensus recommending the #4. It's the one I most often reach for in just about any circumstances.
Using a plane isn't rocket science and really doesn't have a huge learning curve. However, setting it up is a somewhat different story. Still not rocket science but make you adjustments and test them on scrap before you take on your panel.
For what you are talking about you will probably want the throat closed to it's maximum and the blade set for taking the very finest of shavings off. Don't get greedy and try to do it in one pass. Attack the surface with the grain but with the plane at a slight angle to the direction of travel. This will give you a cleaner slicing cut and help avoid chatter. Don't bear down on the plane, let it do it's thing mostly by weight. You're not trying to remove a lot of material here, just some raised lines.
When doing a panel you will probably find the hardest thing is getting the blade parallel to the sole of the plane so don't test you adjustments on the edge of a piece of stock do it on the face so you are taking full width cuts.
Good luck
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Mike G wrote:

And try to avoid raising more lines by getting the blade out of whack and shiplapping the workpiece. (DAMHIKT...)
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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I cannot agree more with Mike on this...
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Folks at the wood hobby shop on my last base were happy to see me, the Co-Pilot and a stack of wood. Meant they'd get the knives sharpened, set and left better than before I planed my stock.
Scrapers or planes are best on ridging. If you also had case-hardening, you should soak the surface before sanding to break the heat set.

some
there.
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I know this does not answer your question but have you thought about replacing the blades on the planer for the kids ? I know your not obligated in any way but it would insure you further use of the tool and it would benefit the kids a bunch. Puff

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I have always been wary of using a belt sander on good wood but have discovered recently that it does a very nice job. I've been sanding some large and very long birch using a Makita 9403 belt sander (11 amp motor behind a 4 x 24 inch belt) and the results were impressive. I suspect, although I haven't tried, that my smaller belt sanders would not yield such good results though.
I'm surprised that the shop teacher doesn't offset the blades a bit to eliminate the effect of the nicked blades. RB
Toller wrote:

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