Cleaning up an old table saw

Page 7 of 7  
On 2/12/2012 4:33 PM, Dave wrote:

http://microjig.com/products/mj-splitter-steel-pro /
This has been around 4~5 years.
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On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 12:46:29 -0800 (PST), Greg Guarino

to have rendered most of the top serviceable. As per the tips here, I cleaned up the rusty goo with paint thinner, making several passes. I applied some paste wax because that's what I had handy, but I may try some of the specialized spray-on stuff later on. I may also use some naval jelly on the one really damaged edge of the right-hand "wing".

this saw. I think it may have come with one, so searching around may yet turn it up. But it certainly did not have a "riving knife", if that's the right term.

admonition never to be in the path of the wood. I've done just a little bit of research, and I'm wondering what the knowledgeable folks here think would be a reasonable and cost effective solution.

make two different splitters (although I'd also have to buy a zero-clearance insert) and their "Grr-ripper" (silly name, IMO). I'm sure there are dozens of others. I'm looking for safety and ease of use for reasonable cost; cost commensurate with my intermittent woodworking. Greg:
You remember right, stay out of the "throw line" of the work. That being said, you can still get wacked by a "top of the blade" throw-back because the wood may come sideways off the blade. Don't ask how I know this. If you want to see it in action, just forget to lock down the rip fence when cutting a 48" square of 3/4 MDF. THe balde teeth leave really neat tracks across the bottom of the board as they chuck it at you.
The Micro Jig splitters work quite well, though you need to be careful in drilling the holes that they snap into in your ZCI . The splitter has to line up just about perfectly with the kerf line on the saw. Follow the instructions and you'll be OK.
Others will disagree (and some of them can still count to ten without taking off their shoes and socks), but operating without a blade guard of any kind is, IMHO, a bad idea. Sure there are times when not using one is maybe OK, but not having the option would be, for me, scary. Look at the Delta overarm guard ($$) and the Excaliber (sp?, $$$). Either may give you ideas on how to engineer some kind of blade guard that isn't too much of a hassle to use. I have a Jet TS and replaced the stock hunk-a-junk with the Delta overarm many years ago and I haven't regretted it. I also installed a Biesmeyer splitter that is great 'cause it's easy on, easy off. Neither may be an option on your old C'man.
Making a ZCI is not all that tough, especially if you have a router and a flush trim bit - just trace the existing insert onto a piece of baltic birch ply (a flat piece!), rough cut outside the line with a sabre saw (or coping saw), then use the existing insert as a template fastened down with double sided tape or even a clamp (that you'll have to move a couple of times) and rout around it with the trim bit. Make 1/2 dozen at one time and you can cut a ZCI for common angle cuts and dado widths.
The Grr-ripper may have a silly name, but it is a GREAT piece of gear. I have and use 2 of them on most cutting projects and on the router table. It's one of those things you won't regret paying for over time. The folks that designed it thought it through and it damn well works! Little things like the O rings that keep the threaded fasteners from falling out - brilliant and simple solution to a really irritating problem.
Regards.
Tom
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On 2/12/2012 6:08 PM, Tom wrote:

Do you use this in lieu of a guard? Sorry for the stupid question, but it certainly looks like you couldn't use both, except perhaps when cutting wide stock (when you might not need it at all?)
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On Mon, 13 Feb 2012 09:51:53 -0500, Greg Guarino wrote:

You must be thinking of the type of guard that comes with most low to medium price saws that combines guard and splitter. No, you can't use one like that. But you can make or buy an overarm guard that works quite well. And it's much less of a PITA than the guard/splitter combo.
The overarm guards that you can buy are expensive. But some even come with dust collection.
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wrote:
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< SNIP>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

I use it 2 ways. On wider stock where the guard isn't in the way I'll use 2 of them on long rips where a push stick wouldn't be appropriate and in lieu of using just my palms on the board. The GR does not slip on the board, even if it's sawdusty, the way my hands do. You're holding the board down and against the fence automatically if you angle the GR's top handle towards the fence as the mfg suggests.
Where the GR really shines is in ripping thin slices against the fence. Think cutting your own 1/4" thick banding to cover the ends of plywood panels so the ply grain doesn't show. In other cases, like ripping a 2.5" board to 2" wide, I feel like I have better control of the board with a GR (or 2) than I would with a push stick and feather board. In both these cases I don't use a guard, just run the tunnel in the GR over the blade. Sounds (and looks) scary, but it's actually quite safe as your hand is well above the blade and shielded by the plastic body of the GR. I'm sure it might be possible to get your hand on the blade when doing this but you'd have to really work at it.
Regards.
Tom
I love the things!
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On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 12:46:29 -0800, Greg Guarino wrote:

As far as kickback, a splitter or riving knife is all that's needed. A blade guard is to protect the operator.
My old Delta has an overarm guard that works well for ripping as long as the wood is wider than the guard. It's a pain for crosscutting because it's metal and heavy. The link below isn't the greatest picture, but it shows the guard. Shouldn't be too hard to make something similar. But make it from plastic so it's light.
http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id 355
Found another picture from the side:
http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id 117
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snipped-for-privacy@rahul.net (Edward A. Falk) wrote in new.rahul.net:

I'd suggest a green scotchbrite pad and WD-40. Then a cotton cloth, then pastewax.
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Go here and hang out and look through the posts.....
http://www.owwm.org
Many Craftsman restores and scores of others...
Sign up and lurk around for a while to see what's up.
Go here: http://wiki.vintagemachinery.org/ and do some more reading.....
For the top, I would use single edge razor blades after a good soak in WD40. Use a basic razor blade scraper to "shave" the rust and other gunk up. After several rounds of that, use a ROS with 120,220,440 and WD40 to clean it up.
To get it really shiny, use any good polishing compound and a buffer.
A few hours of work and she will come back to life...
Look at some of these:
http://www.vintagemachinery.org/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id "2&tab=4
On 2/11/2012 1:45 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

his office in. It's probably 30 years old, and never saw much use. I'm trying to fix it up a bit to use it on occasion.

"bubbling". The "wings", if that's the right term were more badly rusted around the edges, which had been bare metal.

came out passably well, I think. The wing edges still look rusty, but I flattened them down enough, I think.

ago, before I did any brushing. So now I have a slurry of rust particles and WD-40 covering the table top. I could use some sort of degreaser to get it off, but then I imagine I'd need to cover it with something to keep it from rusting again. Wax, I'm thinking.

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