Cleaning up an old table saw

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On 2/13/12 10:37 AM, Han wrote:

Yep, i have the humidifier set to try and maintain 30% in the winter, any higher and the resulting moisture on the window ledges and such can cause damage, unless I want to religiously go around and wipe them off at least once a day.
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On 2/13/2012 9:37 AM, Han wrote:

And, it all depends around the "dew point" ... the temperature at which water vapor in the air becomes saturated and condensation starts.
It should also be noted that a "cooler" is relative. :)
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On 2/13/2012 8:39 AM, Norvin Gordon wrote:

THAT example is warm air hitting a cool surface.
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Steve Barker
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"Greg Guarino" wrote in message
There's an old Craftsman table saw in the basement of the building my Dad had his office in. It's probably 30 years old, and never saw much use. I'm trying to fix it up a bit to use it on occasion.
I know that Craftsman is held in low regard here, but perhaps I can prevail on the nice folks here for some advice.
Rust: The main table surface had a fair amount of surface rust, but hardly any "bubbling". The "wings", if that's the right term were more badly rusted around the edges, which had been bare metal.
I went at it with Scotch-Brite and a rotary wire brush. The main table surface came out passably well, I think. The wing edges still look rusty, but I flattened them down enough, I think.
I had doused the whole thing pretty liberally with WD-40 a couple of weeks ago, before I did any brushing. So now I have a slurry of rust particles and WD-40 covering the table top. I could use some sort of degreaser to get it off, but then I imagine I'd need to cover it with something to keep it from rusting again. Wax, I'm thinking.
Any better ideas? =========================================================Kerosene. It will clean up the old crud and won't cause rust.
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"Greg Guarino" wrote:

------------------------------------- Use any of the phosphoric acid based rust desolvers such as navel jelly.
Sand with 150 grit and WD40.
Wipe clean and wax frequently until wax build up has happened.
Have fun.
Lew
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On 2/11/2012 9:33 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I have a neighbor that is a gun engraver. He claims that after using naval jelly that he never has a rust problem, with no further treatment of any kind.
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On 2/12/2012 3:10 PM, Leon wrote:

Phosphoric acid is a pickling agent use in the metal processing industry. So the slight coating of iron phosphate may last a long time preventing oxidation.
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Sand that baby down.
I sanded my Delta down, I wanted the powermatic 66 look (polished, no machine marks) . I just kept going at it. I put a few different grits, starting with 220 alum oxide, progressing to 800 wet dry on my Random Orbit Sander. It is smooth as silk.... Every now and then a coat of paste wax. Johnsons, or butchers wax....
On 2/11/2012 9:14 PM, CW wrote:

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On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 13:45:50 -0800 (PST), Greg Guarino
his office in. It's probably 30 years old, and never saw much use. I'm trying to fix it up a bit to use it on occasion.

"bubbling". The "wings", if that's the right term were more badly rusted around the edges, which had been bare metal.

came out passably well, I think. The wing edges still look rusty, but I flattened them down enough, I think.

before I did any brushing. So now I have a slurry of rust particles and WD-40 covering the table top. I could use some sort of degreaser to get it off, but then I imagine I'd need to cover it with something to keep it from rusting again. Wax, I'm thinking.

Wipe off what you can with rags or paper towel, then use Top Saver on it to get the rest of the rust. Incredible stuff. http://ns2.42l.com/Lubricant-TopSaver/TopSaver.html
Wax works, but, IMO, Boeshield (spray can stuff) is better. Do not use automotive wax with silicone.
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Drench the top with WD-40. Slap a gray Scotchbrite pad onto the bottom of your radial orbit sander and go at it. Wipe dry and hit it with a couple of coats of paste wax.
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On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 13:45:50 -0800 (PST), Greg Guarino
his office in. It's probably 30 years old, and never saw much use. I'm trying to fix it up a bit to use it on occasion.

"bubbling". The "wings", if that's the right term were more badly rusted around the edges, which had been bare metal.

came out passably well, I think. The wing edges still look rusty, but I flattened them down enough, I think.

before I did any brushing. So now I have a slurry of rust particles and WD-40 covering the table top. I could use some sort of degreaser to get it off, but then I imagine I'd need to cover it with something to keep it from rusting again. Wax, I'm thinking.

Boesheild???
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On 2/11/2012 3:45 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

his office in. It's probably 30 years old, and never saw much use. I'm trying to fix it up a bit to use it on occasion.

"bubbling". The "wings", if that's the right term were more badly rusted around the edges, which had been bare metal.

came out passably well, I think. The wing edges still look rusty, but I flattened them down enough, I think.

ago, before I did any brushing. So now I have a slurry of rust particles and WD-40 covering the table top. I could use some sort of degreaser to get it off, but then I imagine I'd need to cover it with something to keep it from rusting again. Wax, I'm thinking.

get a grill stone for the final polish, then cut the mess (after rags) with brake cleaner. Have the wings sandblasted, and powdercoated, and protect by keeping dry.
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On 2/11/2012 11:15 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

I do what has been recommend but have a piece of plywood cut to the size of the table saw, that keep the humid air from directly contacting the table.
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On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 10:06:33 -0500, Keith Nuttle wrote:

That may not hurt, but unless the fit of plywood to table is airtight and the plywood is sealed (and *not* with latex) I don't think it'll do any good.
In some environments it may even trap moisture.
If it works for you, great. But I wouldn't suggest it as a general solution.
--
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"Larry Blanchard" wrote in message
On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 10:06:33 -0500, Keith Nuttle wrote:

That may not hurt, but unless the fit of plywood to table is airtight and the plywood is sealed (and *not* with latex) I don't think it'll do any good.
In some environments it may even trap moisture.
If it works for you, great. But I wouldn't suggest it as a general solution. =====================================================================It works very well. Even a cloth thrown over the table will do it.
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On 2/11/2012 4:45 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

his office in. It's probably 30 years old, and never saw much use. I'm trying to fix it up a bit to use it on occasion.

Well it doesn't have Saw Stop tech, so use it at your own risk.

"bubbling". The "wings", if that's the right term were more badly rusted around the edges, which had been bare metal.
The best way to remove serious rust is with Naval Jell. It works effortlessly, even on thick rust.

came out passably well, I think. The wing edges still look rusty, but I flattened them down enough, I think.
This is OK on rust that began a few minutes ago. Rust that is starting to "bubble" needs Naval Jell.

ago, before I did any brushing. So now I have a slurry of rust particles and WD-40 covering the table top. I could use some sort of degreaser to get it off, but then I imagine I'd need to cover it with something to keep it from rusting again. Wax, I'm thinking.
Get all the WD-40 off (lacquer thinner works for me) before using the Naval Jell. After cleaning off all the naval jell with rags and water, wipe down with lacquer thinner and immediately spray with Bostik TopCote. Your top will be slick as ICE and rust will be history with some minor maintenance. (Spray on a another coat every few months, takes a few seconds and no effort.) If any of the rust "bubbled", the jell will remove it, but the rust pits will remain. No biggie, just looks a little funky.

No. I've been through all this and speak from experience. TopCote will prevent rust and is slick as ice. In a normal environment it will last a long time. My first shop was in a basement with water problems and I became an expert on this. Wax does not cut it, it is not as slick as TopCote, and is harder to apply, and does not last. I even went so far as to melt wax in lacquer thinner and paint it on my tops, still got rust as the wax quickly wears off. Some say to use Boseshield T-9, but in some very lengthy discussions on this subject in the rec, I don't think it's as good as Topcote, not slick enough among other things. I never used it though, so I have to go by what was said about it in the rec.
--
Jack
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On 2/11/2012 3:45 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

his office in. It's probably 30 years old, and never saw much use. I'm trying to fix it up a bit to use it on occasion.

"bubbling". The "wings", if that's the right term were more badly rusted around the edges, which had been bare metal.

came out passably well, I think. The wing edges still look rusty, but I flattened them down enough, I think.

ago, before I did any brushing. So now I have a slurry of rust particles and WD-40 covering the table top. I could use some sort of degreaser to get it off, but then I imagine I'd need to cover it with something to keep it from rusting again. Wax, I'm thinking.

I have tried several products for preventing rust. Wax and Bowshield are popular but did not work for me. I use Bostitch TopCote. Empire TopSaver is another good brand but a bit more trouble to use.
Odd things that I have learned through the years.
Elmers, and Titebond wood glues will remove rust from the iron top, so well that the finish relieved will be silver.
Have I ever use glue to restore a finish? NO! But drips of glue hit the surface and when I remove the glue some time later the surface is like new.
A flat card scraper will make a top, in pretty good shape, as smooth as a baby's butt very quickly with a pass or two.
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My application of wd-40, Scotch Brite and a little rotary wire brushing seems to have rendered most of the top serviceable. As per the tips here, I cleaned up the rusty goo with paint thinner, making several passes. I applied some paste wax because that's what I had handy, but I may try some of the specialized spray-on stuff later on. I may also use some naval jelly on the one really damaged edge of the right-hand "wing".
So here's the next problem. I have not yet found a blade guard anywhere near this saw. I think it may have come with one, so searching around may yet turn it up. But it certainly did not have a "riving knife", if that's the right term.
I remember being taught about kickback in high school; mostly the stern admonition never to be in the path of the wood. I've done just a little bit of research, and I'm wondering what the knowledgeable folks here think would be a reasonable and cost effective solution.
2 products from Micro-Jig look interesting, at least to my untutored eye. They make two different splitters (although I'd also have to buy a zero-clearance insert) and their "Grr-ripper" (silly name, IMO). I'm sure there are dozens of others. I'm looking for safety and ease of use for reasonable cost; cost commensurate with my intermittent woodworking.
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On 2/12/2012 2:46 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

to have rendered most of the top serviceable. As per the tips here, I cleaned up the rusty goo with paint thinner, making several passes. I applied some paste wax because that's what I had handy, but I may try some of the specialized spray-on stuff later on. I may also use some naval jelly on the one really damaged edge of the right-hand "wing".

this saw. I think it may have come with one, so searching around may yet turn it up. But it certainly did not have a "riving knife", if that's the right term.

admonition never to be in the path of the wood. I've done just a little bit of research, and I'm wondering what the knowledgeable folks here think would be a reasonable and cost effective solution.

make two different splitters (although I'd also have to buy a zero-clearance insert) and their "Grr-ripper" (silly name, IMO). I'm sure there are dozens of others. I'm looking for safety and ease of use for reasonable cost; cost commensurate with my intermittent woodworking.
I use the Microjig splitter, the on with the steel center core.
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I didn't know they made ones with a metal component. Here's the plastic ones so he knows what you're talking about. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pQ151&cat=1,41080,51225
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