Cleaning up an old table saw

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Wow. All I can say is this must be another example of why eyewitness testimony is often considered suspect ... two totally different recollections. :)
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On 2/14/2012 7:46 AM, Swingman wrote:

Perhaps but do you remember me being there? I remember you staying later, after I left for the day, to apply WD40. I distinctly remember the band saw being the first thing I noticed, then the jointer. And Yeah I know cold surface warm humid air. But I am pretty sure that because the doors were open all day long it was not cold in the shop, and then the front blew in and we had a drop what you are doing, problem to address.
Oh well..... LOL
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On 2/14/2012 8:57 AM, Leon wrote:

Are you brother? This is starting to sound like one that I had with my brothers about events in our past.
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On 2/14/2012 5:19 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Worse than that.
According to our wives, our brains, if nothing else, are cloned identical twins. :)
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Why a one-time happening would become his rule is another oddity.
-- Fear not those who argue but those who dodge. -- Marie Ebner von Eschenbach
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On Tuesday, February 14, 2012 5:11:22 AM UTC-8, Leon wrote:

On Tuesday, February 14, 2012 5:11:22 AM UTC-8, Leon wrote:

There was probably an abrupt change in air pressure (if air at high relative humidity expands, its density goes down BUT the relative humidity goes up). The result is that your ambient air in the shop was instantly supersaturated, and the first nucleation site it found was on the iron. Once the water film was established, the whole wet surface was a fast growing dewdrop. Getting a dewdrop started (from near-zero diameter), is energetically hard because of the surface tension that acts to diminish the dewdrop diameter and return moisture to the surrounding air. Waxing the iron makes the nucleation sites hydrophobic, thus the dewdrop has to create the whole spherical surface against surface tension.
There needn't be any important temperature change involved, in condensation.
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More likely the garage was open, the cold front hit, and they pulled the garage door down. The cold damp air cooled the metal and the now "supersaturated" air condensed out on the cool surface. See previous post re: RH and dew point.
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On 2/14/2012 10:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Close but the door stayed open when this all happened.
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wrote:

"Quite warm" was likely pretty humid too. The cold front dropped the temp of the air which cooled the steel, and the absolute humidity (mg of water per cubic meter, or oz per cubic yard) stayed the same - raising the relative humidity - and the dew point and surface temperature met. The relative humidity of the cold air was likely 90+ %. If you had simply cooled the metal quickly to the same temperature, without changing the air temp, you would most likely also have experienced the condensation or "sweating" of the metal.
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On 2/14/2012 9:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Very humid it was! Sounds like you may have the answer here.
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Han wrote:

So, when it is zero outside and 70 inside my house with 70% humidity, the wet stuff on my windows (inside) is NOT condensation???
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On 2/13/2012 8:39 AM, Norvin Gordon wrote:

Han is correct.
What you describe is the result of the warmer air inside the building hitting the colder surface of a cold window, not the reverse.
Condensation generally happens when warm, moisture laden air hits a cooler service.
When is the last time you saw condensation forming on a mug of hot coffee on a cold day? ;)
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QED
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On 2/13/2012 10:28 AM, Swingman wrote:

It is relative. If it is warmer on the inside than out, the condensation will be on the inside of the window. If the reverse is true it would be on the outside of the window. You can see this when you have a hot humid day and have the air conditioner very cold.
If it real cold, what about frost?
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On 2/13/2012 10:47 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Already stated in subsequent post prior to yours.
If it is warmer on the inside than out, the condensation

Read again what I said ... nothing in your quote above changes what I stated in the least.

Frost has nothing to do with condensation. AAMOF, if the conditions are right for condensation, you won't normally see "frost":
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/wea00/wea00039.htm
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Karl is right. Just like little frozen ice puddles will disappear on a clear day without any evidence of liquid water (it's called sublimation), a very cold object can acquire little ice crystals (frost) when the surrounding air is moist enough. See again "dew-point".
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On 2/13/2012 11:04 AM, Han wrote:

I'm guessing they don't teach basic chemistry in middle school (what we called Jr. High) any longer?
I recall, Mr Becker spent a good deal of time on condensation and vaporization in ninth grade chemistry, and in High School we actually learned to calculate the enthalpy of the reactions ... remember that?
Then again, things have changed since a ninth grade in 1957.
:(
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Thermo was college work in Holland. First year '63-64. I don't remember the equivalent of 9th grade high school anymore, thankfully.
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On 2/13/2012 11:50 AM, Han wrote:

I clearly remember that the "State of Matter" was one unit that took up an entire six week grade period in middle school Chemistry.
Thinking back on it, and in contrast to what "education" encompasses today, I now realize what an excellent education we received in those days. Based on the perspective, it was safe to say the education in this country had sunken to such a low point when my youngest graduated in 2002, that it was relatively unrecognizable as such.
I'm pretty well convinced that two factors that were in greater supply in those days are largely responsible for the current decline ... discipline, and the quality of the teachers.
The trend downward started in the early seventies around here, and all it took was one complete 12 year cycle to insure that from that point forward, educational mediocrity is the only guaranteed result for the population as a whole.
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In my time, we had at least 3 foreign languages in high school. 15 years later, when my yougest sister in law graduated, she didn't even have English. (She is a very nice person anyway).

Discipline is the parents' responsibility, and the baby boom wore out a lot of teachers, I think.

I think a renaissance of sorts is happening now. And, again, when my daughter graduated from high school 22 or so years ago, at a relatively common high school on Long Island, at least 3 out of 200 were admitted to the ivy league college of their choice. If you get a group of kids and parents together who challenge (and help) the kids, miracles will happen.
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