Cleaning rust off Stanley #15 plane

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I went "shopping" in my Dad's garage again. I have a sticky door at home and figured I could use a plane to shave it down a hair. The plane hasn't been used in a long time and has a little surface rust. I was thinking about scotch-brite, steel wool, maybe noxon. Any better ideas?
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On 7/28/2011 8:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@risky-biz.com wrote:

Here is a trick that is out side the box. In an inconspicuous area put a drop of Titebond glue on the rusted surface. Let it dry a few hours and remove the glue. I quite often get drops of glue on the top of my cast iron TS top and when I remove the glue the surface looks "brand new".
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On Thu, 28 Jul 2011 18:50:46 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@risky-biz.com"

For light rust removal, I use a piece of green or grey scotch-brite with a dab of oil or WD40, whichever is closest at hand. Paste wax to prevent rust returning.
For light film rust like on handsaws or large planes I use a razor blade to lightly scrape the flat areas. Blunt the corners on a stone so there is no sharp edges. You can scrape an awful lot of the rust off. Be careful not to gouge the metal. I use one of the razor blade holders Hyde used to make for scraping paint off of windows back in the day there were wooden windows. With the heft of it off, you can now sand it, dissolve it with vinegar (don't leave too long or it will etch), citric acid (I haven't tried CA), Evaporust (good stuff but $) or get fancy and take up the hobby of electrolysis.
All these are well covered in the Google archive of rec.woodworking, and a regular google search will turn up a few hundred thousand hits. Here's a great starting place. Should keep you busy reading for a few hours.
http://www.wkfinetools.com/index.asp
Regards, Roy
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wrote:

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On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 15:31:17 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What proportions do you recommend? I have not tried it, but IIRC the sulphur in the molasses acts as a chealating agent. Here's an interesting link on it I pulled from the Oldtools list. Never heard of dried molasses before.
http://www.massmopar.com/Files/340save/photos/photo1.html
Evaporust runs $20/gallon from Tractor Supply. I'm on my second gallon even though it is reusable. I strongly suggest you keep it in a tightly sealed container when in use, just so some clumsy oaf can't stumble over it causing a sudden fall and of course spilling every drop of the elixir. Happened to a guy who lives near me.
Regards, Roy
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wrote:

3.5 to 10 parts water to one part molasses. It's a combination, apparently of the chelating action and the acetic acid produced by the fermentation (which causes the "head" on the mixture)

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I second the Evaporust. I used it on two Stanley planes and it worked perfectly. Took only a few hours to clean everything and it evens leaves a protective coating to prevent rust, although only a short-term coating (6-8 weeks depending on handling).
I've used Evaporust on several old and new items and can't imagine cleaning rust, especially heavy rust, any other way.
Good luck!
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On 7/30/2011 9:01 AM, Casper wrote:

I bought Evaporust on recommendations from people here. I can't imagine anyone recommending the stuff. It takes forever to touch even light rust. For light rust WD40 and steel wool should work For heavy rust, I've found nothing that touches Naval Jelly. That stuff works fast and removes all rust fast with no damage to the metal other than damage the rust may have already done. I've seen people in here trash Naval Jelly, fortunately, I'd used it too many times and know how well it works.
For light rust on a hand plane, I'd try WD40 or similar and steel wool, clean when finished with lacquer thinner or similar, then spray with some TopCote or similar. If that didn't work, I'd replace WD40 with Naval Jelly, and lacquer thinner with water, and repeat.
--
Jack
You Can't Fix Stupid, but You Can Vote it Out!
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On Sat, 30 Jul 2011 11:34:51 -0400, Jack Stein wrote:

Another possibility. I've had pretty good luck with a solution of salt in vinegar. Just keep adding salt till the vinegar won't absorb any more. IIRC, you wind up with a weak solution of hydrochloric acid.
Just be sure to oil or wax the tool as soon as you remove it from its soak and dry it off. Otherwise new rust will start forming almost instantly.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On 7/30/11 11:40 AM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Every time one of these "how to remove rust" threads comes up, it's the same old run-around. I see everybody posting about WD-40 and a scotchbrite pad and "a few hours later," or Evaporust "only takes a few hours," and the same thing with naval jelly.
Then someone comes in and says, "why not just get Boeshield Rust Free and be done in minutes instead of hours." But people, for whatever reason, still seem to want to go the rub-n-scrub route, like the elbow grease makes them feel better for letting the tools get rusty. A rust penitence of sort. :-)
I'm guessing Naval Jelly is the one thing that comes close because it also has Phosphoric Acid.
This is the last rust removal thread I'll post in. You can lead a horse to water...
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Yup but don't wally about, get stuck in with the powered wire brushes and do the job properly.
I'm having a break at the moment and I've mentioned it before but I'm a volunteer with:
http://www.twam.co.uk /
I spend a lot of time refurbishing old planes, I've up-loaded some pics here:
http://i298.photobucket.com/albums/mm256/stuartwinsor/Plane
For some reason photobucket has the pic I uploaded first, of the plane when it arrived at number 8 and when I'd finished with it, at No 4
The set also shows some of the tools used. The angle grinder and wire cup bush is used on all flat surfaces but do use proper PPE. Eye protection is absolutely essential.
--
Stuart Winsor

Midland RISC OS show - Sat July 9th 2011
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wrote:

Nice, I've been restoring old tools, engines, farm equipment for a long time. I rarely use naval jelly anymore, I have a 8 inch diameter course wire brush in a bench motor running 1800 rpm and use that 99 percent of the time on everything. Works perfectly.
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On 7/31/2011 3:13 AM, bw wrote:

Yes, I have exactly the same thing on an old 1800 rpm washing machine motor. I use a fairly soft wire wheel and I use it on everything small enough to hold to the wheel. On a hand plane with light rust, that is what I would use.
Naval jelly is rarely needed but it seems to store forever. I've had some on the shelf for around 15 years, and just the other day used it to clean some heavy rust off the bottom plate of a hand truck that was heavily rusted. Worked great and easily.
At any rate, Evaporust, imo, is next to worthless.
--
Jack
Got Change: Global Warming ======> Global Fraud!
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over un-removed rust - basically trapping the rust in the surface - where it WILL come back. Knocking off the loose scale, then using a chemical remover, followed by a good brushing, is usually best for cast iron and other rough/porous surfaces.
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On 7/30/2011 1:08 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I never used Boeshield but naval jelly has been around forever. It works great, but I'm open to suggestions, so someday might try Boeshield on your recommendation. If I do, I'll certainly let everyone know my thoughts next time the subject comes up. I'd love to hear comparisons, wouldn't you?

Thing is, there are new horses and new water holes all the time. People are not born with infinite knowledge and you never know when you might learn something. I learned Evaporust was worthless, I tried it, it sucks the big one. I don't mind sharing what I've learned, or learning what someone else learned. What amazes me is that someone would claim Evaporust had value, unless his hand was in an Evaporust pocket?
If you think Boeshield is good, there is no reason to stop mentioning it when the subject comes up. Myself, I think Evaporust is worthless enough to mention it every time someone touts it.
--
Jack
Got Change: And the Change SUCKS!
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On 7/31/11 7:51 AM, Jack Stein wrote:

Absolutely. I'm hesitant to criticize Naal Jelly because, a. I haven't used it and b. it has the same active ingredient.
Most post was mainly aimed at the guys who still use stuff like WD-40 and a scratch pad and 3hrs of elbow grease (I hope they know it's the elbow grease and not the WD-40.... may as well be using cooking spray or kerosene), or some other product that has to soak for 3hrs.
The whole waxing and buffing out a saw top is beyond me, too. I'd rather be making stuff with my tools in those 3hrs than working on my tools for 3hrs.
I'm honestly not discounting, however, the therapeutic effect of listening to the radio, doing a mindless tasks with ones hands for an extended period of time.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Sunday, July 31, 2011 8:51:48 AM UTC-4, Jack Stein wrote:

Exactly. I'm the original poster. I consider myself a pretty bright guy, but one of the most important components of that is knowing what you don't know, and not being afraid to ask about it.
The number of answers has certainly surprised me. I couldn't see them for a while because Google Groups is on the fritz. Thanks to all. Scotch Brite did the trick nicely. The plane was not that badly rusted.
Thanks to all.
Greg Guarino
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On 8/3/2011 8:57 AM, snipped-for-privacy@risky-biz.com wrote:

one of the most important components of that is knowing what you don't know, and not being afraid to ask about it.

while because Google Groups is on the fritz. Thanks to all. Scotch Brite did the trick nicely. The plane was not that badly rusted.

You're welcome. You should look for an old motor and put an arbor with a wire wheel on it. I clean 99.9% of all rust with just a soft wire wheel on a motor. By soft I mean I take off 4-5 layers of skin when I contact it. My motor is from an old washing machine I think, it turns at 1800 rpm. It's one of my most used tools in the shop. Today's washing machines/dryers have motors w/o a cover, so they don't cut it. It would clean up your planes with no effort.
Also, once you get it cleaned up, spray some TopCote on it, you will be happy.
--
Jack
You Can't Fix Stupid, but You Can Vote it Out!
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Wire wheels are available for bench grinders, so if you've already got a bench grinder adding the wire wheel is cheap and easy.
I've used the steel wheel attachment on the dremel many times for cleaning ruts and gunk off of things. One thing I learned is that as soon as the first bristle flies off, replace the wheel. Others will follow soon.
Puckdropper
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On 8/3/2011 10:03 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

I'm too lazy to be changing out wheels on my bench grinder. Also, with it on an arbor on a motor, the whole wheel is exposed making it easy to get into nooks and crannies, and odd shapes. When my kid leaves the horseshoes out half the summer, I can clean them up pretty good. To use my bench grinder I'd have to take off the wheel, the wheel covers, the tool rests and so on.

I don't own a dremel, but, I own a body grinder and have been wanting to by a wire wheel or cup for that for years.
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Jack
We have enough youth. How about a fountain of "smart"?
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