cleanest cut

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I looked at the video of the guy making chopping blocks with the laminate then cut then insert slice then laminate and repeat technique
doing a variation on this (not a choppingblock) and used the jigsaw it's not a bad cut but it's not so clean that it only needs a light sanding
Share your method for this step if you've used the technique.
didn't want to change my bandsaw blade to do this but maybe I should
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On 2/4/2015 3:16 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Which video? I built 6 cutting boards in December with curvy laminated veneers. It does involve much more than cutting with a BS and gluing if your curved veneers are of significant thickness.
If your veneers are going to be curved you must remove as much material as you plan to replace or the radius's will not be the same for mating surfaces.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/15897193448/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/15897346730/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/16062588371/in/photostream/
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On 2/4/2015 5:23 PM, Leon wrote:

Here is how to do what I did.
This was the video that taught me everything to do these.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lR9_CjQYZj4

If this is what you are after, watch it several times and question every thing. ;~)
Let me know if you have any "why" questions.
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On Wed, 04 Feb 2015 17:39:40 -0600

I don't have those tools but that's the video I saw so I will find a remedy with what I've got
something occurred to me though, those really fine inlays are going to be sliced up over time and break free it's beautiful work but the wrong application
I rarely use a router but I have two from days of old. There's bit he uses on the curve face with a bearing on the end. what's that doing?
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On 2/5/2015 11:14 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

Yeah but not a big problem though. They are glued in there so big chunks don't come out. Obviously end grain boards have an advantage.

He actually works each cut of the panel in 3 steps.
With the hand held router he cuts a curved grove using the bearing on the bit to follow the guide. This is strictly to establish the curve and to give a smooth surface for the bit in the router table to reference after cutting the panel in that grove. He makes about a 1/4" deep cut. This cut provides a smooth surface on both halves, after cutting apart with the BS, which will be his reference surface for the flush cut bearing bit in the router table to follow instead of the pattern. Essentially this finishes off what the smaller bit started with the hand held router.
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"Electric Comet" wrote in message

They aren't really inlays per se because they are as thick as the base material. As such, if the board does start looking exceptionally ratty it wouldn't be a problem to use a card scraper, or something like a Stanley No 80, to clean up the surface.
I did that with the large maple cutting board countertop at my parents' house... it had seen about 35-40 years of use and was cut up pretty badly. That in itself wasn't too big of a deal until my mother put something on it that caused the entire surface to become gummy... My brother tried to sand it... Major Fail! I took it back to my shop and in short order had the entire surface cleaned up with the No 80. I also applied mineral oil to the surface. It looked like new and wasn't sticky any more.
Also, a cutting board like this may not be the everyday board...
John
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On 2/5/2015 3:13 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Correct, more like a lamination. Nailshooter got one those cutting boards and he says he keeps them in good shape by sharpening his knife every time he cuts on the board and not continuing to saw away after the cut is completed. And uses one of those stainless steel scrub pads, that look like a Slinky that got twisted up too much, to scrub the surface. He claims that the surface stays relatively unblemished.
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On Thu, 05 Feb 2015 16:52:28 -0600

the perfect model consumer very rare majority do not obsess over their chopping blocks or any other kitchen implements me included
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"Electric Comet" wrote:

You can pry my 5 Star, forged, Henckels 10" chef knife from my cold dead hand along with the steel used to keep it sharp.
Lew
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On 2/5/2015 4:51 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

LOL. I'm with you.
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On 2/5/2015 7:04 PM, Max wrote:

I like my Henckels. They are very good blades.
But I love my Wasabi.
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On Thursday, February 5, 2015 at 6:37:53 PM UTC-5, Electric Comet wrote:

Doing things right doesn't make one obsessive.
(My Henckels set lives in its own drawer, in a knife holder I made for them over 30 years ago.)
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On Thu, 5 Feb 2015 16:13:48 -0500

Ok whatever the term doesn't matter those very fine wood strips that he laminated will be getting cut

Most consumers do not bother
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On Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 6:40:02 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

...Snip...

Here's another cutting board video. I post it not because of the cutting boards or the process, but because of the cordless drill powered bench grinder seen at 1:50.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fyxzi3ElNbU

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On 2/5/2015 3:39 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

LOL. That is a pretty good optical illusion. Reminds me of a picture that Swingman took of me when we were installing some kitchen cabinets that he and I built. I appeared to have no head.
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopEuropeanStyleKitchen201102#5679345422630596018
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Leon wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------- Wouldn't touch that one with a 20 ft bar clamp.<G>
Lew
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On Wed, 04 Feb 2015 17:23:24 -0600

was a magazine video, don't recall which mag

I missed this detail will have to think a little on how to remedy
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On 2/4/2015 9:00 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

The video addresses that. I used 4, 1/8" veneers and removed 1/2" for each location. I cut the veneers on the band saw and sanded down to 1/8" with a drum sander. The trick to making a smooth cut in the board is to make a shallow cut against a pattern with a 1/2" bit and cut in the resulting grove with a BS. Then with a flush cut pattern bit against the shallow grove remove the rest of the material.
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"Leon" wrote in message

I noticed that in the video... seems so obvious once someone points it out! LOL
But then I've been playing with my shaper and doing pattern shaping. Maybe because of that I am more tuned into what was in the video than some others would be??
John
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On 2/5/2015 8:55 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

I actually used a small flush cut bottom bearing bit in my small Makita trim router to follow a pattern clamped to the cutting board. I took out most of the remainder 1/2" wide grove with the BS so that my cleanup cut with a 1-1/8" bottom bearing bit in the router table would not have to do much but take out what was remaining, up to the previously made grove using the trim router.
There are a lot of subtle things going on in the video that you need to consider, as you have noticed. ;~) I think I watched the video 4~5 times to understand how he got to where ended up and why.
I do recall him switching to a smaller bit for to follow a pattern when he wanted his inlay to be narrower.
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