Clean a Bandsaw?

My father-in-law gave me a 10" Black & Decker table-top bandsaw. All the parts appear to be there, albeit a bit dirty or rusty. It's a three-wheel bandsaw that uses a 56-1/8 blade.
I finally picked up a blade, but before I install it, I'd like to clean it up. What's the best way to go about cleaning the rollers/blocks and such?
Soak them in rust remover for a few minutes? Then wire brush what's left? I want to be sure the rollers aren't going to be a problem. I'm primarily talking about the upper head. I haven't taken it apart yet to see underneath, but I hope it's in better shape being covered up.
I don't have room for a bigger bandsaw (as much as I would love one) and was surprised when my father-in-law showed up one day with this.
I do woodturning, scrollsaw and carving and always had to go use his old Delta 12" (scarey thing). Unfortunately he passed in March and his wife isn't sharing. However, I'm grateful for this one and am hoping I can get it into decent usable shape to keep around for a while.
I'm not uber experienced with bandsaws, but picked up the bandsaw book. So any information and or tips greatly appreciated.
...the daughter-in-law. ;)
`Casper
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see www.owwm.org / .com, they will have lots of tips and information about many machines.
On 08/26/2011 09:48 AM, Casper wrote:

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Two easy things to check are the tension knob and tires. The tension knob should move easily through its entire tension range and if it doesn't it may be damaged. The tires need to be free of debris and must be cleaned if they aren't.
For cleaning rust, it all depends on where it is and how bad. Use whatever you need to clean the table off, then apply some form of rust protectant. If an aluminum table, you may still benefit from the use of paste wax or similar.
If the bearings turn freely, they're probably alright. If they don't move (or if they're chewed up) you'll need to replace them.
FWIW, I found adjusting the guide blocks and thrust bearing by eye rather than using feeler gauges or the crumpled up $100 bill worked much better for me.
Puckdropper
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Turns out the saw was cleaner than I initially thought. This weekend I cleaned up the little bit of rust on the screws, rollers and guides in about 20 minutes. Cleaned it all, including the table top, with a wire brush and a little WD-40. Looks just fine.
One problem is the upper block arm (rod-guide support?) is aluminium and the adjustment screw socket is stripped. I used a toothpick to hold the screw in until I can get a replacement or alternative repair.
Only thing missing is the insert table. Does plastic work well for those? After installing the blade, the little cheap wooden one that came with it no longer fits. Looks like particle board?
I couldn't locally find a bandsaw blade in the size I needed other than a Bosch, so I am currently trying one. So far it's working good. Cut through bone like butter, tracked great and even kept the dust down. I'll see how long it lasts.
I don't know much about 3-wheel bandsaws, but I am reading up on them. Seems they're not well liked. Are they even made any more? I figure a few evenings reading the Bandsaw Book should be educational.
`Casper
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