Circular saw with sliding straight edge system

I'm looking for opinions on these systems and what is best. I don't know much about them, but I guess the system where the saw was made for the slider would work best. Whatvis the proper name for these? (Whould help with the searching!) Thanks, -S
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I'm looking for opinions on these systems and what is best. I don't know much about them, but I guess the system where the saw was made for the slider would work best. Whatvis the proper name for these? (Whould help with the searching!) Thanks, -S
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They are called Circular-Saw Edge Guide The recent Fine Homebuilding has a review of them. http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuilding/pages/fh_182_092.asp
However, for me, I made one from two sheets of hardboard one offset by 6", ran the saw down it and presto, a perfect edge guide. Dave

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SimonLW wrote:

For another take, think about gluing a straight, 3/4" thick board to a 9" or so wide strip of hardboard. When the glue dries, run the saw along the board, cutting the hardboard and leaving a 4", or so wide strip. You can then clamp your new tool to the work, the board will guide the saw, and the cut edge will show you where the cut will be.
The same idea works great for guiding routers.
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B A R R Y wrote:

I find using a 1x as the straightedge eats up too much of the cut depth capacity, so I use thinner stuff. If the fence piece is located at about a third point on the plywood straightedge base you can run the saw down both sides, cutting both edges, so you'll have a straightedge for both sides of the saw. It's also a good idea to have assorted lengths of these straightedges, and ones for the various saw blades.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

True! I have a mini version for my Makita trim saw that the "guide" is only 3/16" thick. Aluminum channel is also excellent for the guide bar. It can be attached with epoxy or screws.

More excellent details.
I always recommend the first two be ~ 52-54" and ~ 102", for obvious reasons.
Writing the details for use of the guide (or any jig, for that matter) right on it with a Sharpie is also helpful. I'll usually include the specific tool it's used with, the blade or bit used, and any "gotchas" I need to remember next time.
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RicodJour wrote:

And yet another set for making bevel cuts, or else the saw will cut away the edge that precisely locates where straight cuts go.
By the way, I had to file off some bumps from the shoe's edge on my Milwaukee, in order to have a straight edge that would track squarely along one of these guides. Has anyone else had to do this?
Regards,
Mark
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SimonLW wrote:

Are you talking about the Festool plunge circular saw with their straight edge guide, with stops, no chip out zero clearance cutting edge edge? At the moment Festool is the only one making this system so there's no generic name for it yet. Pricey system but if you're doing just sheet goods work and/ or doing on site work it looks quite handy. Particulary like the fact that you set the cut side of the straight edge directly on your cut line rather than on some offset to it based on your particular circular saw. One less opportunity for a measuring or marking mistake.
charlie b
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Sounds like what I'll thinking about. I work in plexi, but don't have the room for a big panel saw to cut the big sheets down for the table saw. -S
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SimonLW wrote:

Sounds like the Festool plunge saw and edge quide will do the job nicely, but for a price. Check Festools site. Festool is aggressively marketing to the amateur and small shops - their stuff is in WoodCraft stores and most power tool resellers so you should be able to see the set up and get Festools DVD. You'll still need a surface to make the cuts on but a 4x8 sheet of 1" foam insulating panel will do the job, assuming you have a flat floor to put it on. Festool has blades specifically for plastinc.
charlie b
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