Circular saw to replace burnt table saw motor?

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Last night my ~$100 Delta table saw worm gear gave up the ghost. (It was a gift from a neighbor)
I used the saw for straight up cuts only (no bevels) with the blade fully extended. The saw has no vertical adjustment but it will bevel.
(Previous to the Delta, I used a home-made adaptor for a Skil saw that made an acceptable 'table saw'. 2 thumbscrews and it was on/off the table. It was very portable and I hung it flat on my wall.)
I do NOT need a pro saw or dado ability.
My idea:
1> I am thinking of a used worm/hypoid gear circular saw as thereplacement 'motor'. At 13 Amps is is almost 2hp and the bearings and the gears are pretty rugged.
2> I would remove the blade guard and I would mount my 10" blade onthe 7-1/4" saw under the table with the blade fully extended.
Anyone ever try this?
BoyntonStu
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Most anything can be made to work, but it can also have the potential for a disaster if done wrong. You can buy a used saw for about $100. I see Craftsman saws in the paper all the time for that price.
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Actually, my first table saw was an old circular saw mounted in a home made table. I didn't think anyone else was goofy enough to try it. <G> It really sucked to use, but it did work. Considering the cost of the cheap, benchtop tablesaws, I would go out & get one of them. I think they'd do a better, safer job. Keep the circular saw for tougher, bigger stuff & you can rip it out by hand.
Jim
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Jim,
I will take a photo of the homemade table saw in the near future. Actually it works very well and the fence is quite accurate. I built it out of formica covered particlebnoard that once was a kitchen cabinet. The fence is a 24" aluminum clamp with a 3" piece of formica board attached. It is about as accurate as the Delta. No fooling! The 'table' is a few plastic milk crates. The table top fits on top of the the milk crate and the Skil saw beneath goes into the crate. As portable and as light as any table saw I ever saw. I store it up on the wall in my garage, Skil saw and fence attached.
My other 'stupid/dangerous' project is my $100 homebuilt elevator. Googlers told me that it would not work 2 years ago. We use it every day. The is based on a 3/4" pipe clamp as the safety brake. A HF 440 lb hoist is the power. 12 seconds and my 300 pound neighbor is up 1 flight with a smile on his face.
BoyntonStu
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I remember your elevator project. Nobody said it would not work, they were concerned of the liability when it kills or maims somebody! Personally I would consider a home made elevator to lift items to the second floor, but never people. Greg
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My post said, "Up one flight". It goes to the second floor. ;>)
As 4simplertimes indicated, you don't need manufactured tools to get the job done right. What is a table sawe?
Simply, a rotating blade that comes up through a slot in a table top. All the rest is your settup ability to keep the stock moving parallel to the blade. AAMOF I invented a table saw that used a Milwaukee Sawzall demo saw as the cutter. It would cut steel and RR ties. Try that on your table saw. It could also tilt in both directions. Ever run into a situation that need that feature? I did once, and that is why I came up with the idea. BTW You could also use a really wide 'blade' covered with sandpaper and walla a table sander. Speaking of safety; what is safer a circular blade or a recipricating blade? Obvious isn't it?
BoyntonStu
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a lawsuit involving bodily injury or death from something I created. Hopefully you will never find out what it is like. What do you think would happen if your 300 lb. neighbor is riding up and the elevator has a catastrophic failure. Falls, breaks a leg, wrenches his back, can't walk anymore. Somebody will pay, and pay dearly. If you want to take the risk, fine. The liability is what I have issue with, not whether it can/could be built.
Any one else see reference to a fellow that built a trolley to get up and down the bank at his lake home? He loaded it up with people and a drive coupling failed and lost control. I forget who all got hurt, but there were lawsuits and counter suits. The lawyers got wealthy from it!
If you want to cobble a tablesaw together from a skill saw have at it. I just would not let anyone else use it. Greg
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That was Tom DeLay's father. It sounds as if the idiot did not test the train out using dead weights before trying it with four people for the first run. The tram went too fast and jumped the rails after the jury-rigged emergency brake failed.
DeLay and his brother sued and extorted a $250K out of court settlement out of the coupling manufacturer - despite the fact that the death was caused by the negligence of the designer-operator.
DeLay is now trying to introduce 'tort reform' to prohibit frivolous lawsuits like the one that he brought. So even if the surgeon removes the wrong leg or testicle by mistake he is only liable for $500K no matter how great the harm caused.
DeLay is also facing a rack of corruption and ethics charges, he has taken a series of illegaly funded foreign junkets, is involved in a corrupt campaign financing scam in Texas and was rebuked by Cheney yesterday for threatening the federal judges whose rulings in the Shaivo case he disagreed with.
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To asses risk you first must look at scale. Up a bank souns like a lot more than 8 feet. It held a lot more than 300 pounds.
If a half-knowledgeable person could not design a safe way of lifting 300 pounds with complete safety, the world would be in a very backward state. How were the pyramids built without Milwaukee Tools? We are becoming a nation of timid people who need experts to tell them how to live.
BoyntonStu
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And lawyers to tell us what NOT to do.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

We're being systematically taught that. What does one really learn in school? To sit still and keep your mouth shut and not challenge authority and not take a leak without first securing permission. And the sad part is that they really think that they're creating free-thinkers.
--
--John
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On Sun, 03 Apr 2005 10:48:46 -0400, "J. Clarke"

You need the Albanian driving test.
Two years of full-time study, including engine rebuilding. They didn't have many drivers, but the ones they had knew their way around mechanics. Now they have a whole population that can build anything, just using baler twine.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

You serious? If so, that's cool--would solve a lot of our problems.
--
--John
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wrote:

Standard Soviet Union, and presumably other Communist clone practice. No service stations, precious few spare parts, and cash on the barrelhead and wait for an available vehicle. Nothing new.
Used to laugh down in Cuba, where you could tell the nationality of a Moskvich owner by the presence or lack of wiper blades. So short in the USSR that they were constantly pilfered, and the Russians kept up the habit. It'd start to rain in Leningrad, and traffic would stop while everybody jumped out and put their blades on.
I'd like to know where you can find a public school where the kids will sit still and learn the basics. Not in the USA. Not any more.
You can challenge reality if you want to appear an idiot, but it still won't change it.
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On Sun, 03 Apr 2005 13:41:19 -0400, "J. Clarke"

That's how it was in Enver Hoxa's day (recent BBC radio 4 programme claimed so too)
Of course once the Wall did come down there was an immense rush to any sort of vehicle. Albania soon gained a reputation as the _worst_ drivers in the _worst_ cars anywhere in the Western world. And I include former Jugoslavia and Turkey.
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No argument from me on that! I see it play out that way at work most every day. I often run across some information that an engineer designed that will not work. I correct it, and send the info back to the engineer for his stamp before proceeding. Not much happens without the engineer's approval. Greg
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My stepfather used and old Skil attached to a piece of 3/4 ply which was mounted on an old washing machine cabinet for years as his tablesaw. He built many a fine cabinet using that setup. The only reason it died was I finally bought him a new Craftsman with all the bells and whisles in about 1972 just before he prematurely left us for good. And it died because I took it out to the backyard and smacked it around with a 10lbs sledge, to insure that it did not come back to the garage. He didn't speak to me for 2 weeks he was so damn mad, but even mad at me when my car died he picked me up for three days to get to work and back, just refused to talk to me. He frankly if alive would walk in my garage, look around shake his head, roll his eyes and leave without saying a word. He built the best with half of what I have and I will never with all I have match the quality of his work if I live to be a 1000 years old.
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Woops other-half is gonna be ticked used because I used her profile by mistake, oh well I'll make her something
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Woops forgot to use my account on the previous post. Otherhalf is gonna be ticked at me, oh well
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Sandra wrote:

but is relearning to walk. When I look at his work and the limited tools he had, I wonder "How in the world . . ."
Glen
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