Circular saw recommendations?

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On 8/8/2011 4:04 PM, Robatoy wrote: ...

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Rob, generally I'll agree w/ you but you're just wrong here...
The RAS isn't nothin' compared to a 1" or larger spindle shaper as to what you can do to yourself and how quickly, but they're also in many large shops.
It is, like anything else, an acquired skill and a comfort level comes w/ that skill and experience.
There's nothing about knots or other things in lumber in a heavy RAS w/ sufficient power to fret over; they simply don't know they exist for the most part.
The problems of small and under-powered are of note but it's the limitations of the implementation of the device not the device itself that's the problem there.
--
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Hell, that's happened before. But what have here, is someone (you) who defends the RAS from the vantage point of having a rugged, rigid industrial 16" and my beef is with the far less secure crap that is in the majority.

Oh hell, yes. A shaper is probably the nastiest piece of gear out there...jointers can eat a hand right to the wrist and blow a cloud of pink mist all over the shop.

And that's another factor. A RAS requires thought, skill, experience. Joe Blow, who buys one on Saturday morning, assembles it hastily in order to build that dream piece of furniture and a RAS is the perfect tool to teach him that there are no short cuts, and second chances only come to a lucky few. Same as a 16-year old with a license he got 2 days prior, who climbs on a 150HP crotch-rocket. Is that the motorcycle's fault? Your argument is that it isn't. (Work with me here). Is it the kid's fault?......in fact, it is the combination of the two which causes all the grief.
As long as one throws qualifiers at the risk factors involved, all tools would end up being safe. We know that that isn't true. The RAS requires a disproportionate amount of caution, especially if it is a wobbly piece of crap.

I agree. Underpowered saws are more dangerous.

You, your experience, smarts, and a fine tool, make that combination as safe as it can be. The rest of the RAS's and their operators are at a higher risk.
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On 8/8/2011 10:55 PM, Robatoy wrote:
...

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I really don't see how the RAS is any riskier than the cheap homeowner TS the same Joe Blow could put in the trunk of his car and carry home for the same purpose...many of them are too small a table, critically underpowered and flimsy just as does the cheap RAS.
As for the comparison, yes, I do tend to blame the operator as being the culprit over the tool as a general precept. I suppose being a farm-bred and raised kid who grew up around large and often far more perilous equipment(+) gives me an attitude, not to mention having reached official geezer status. :)
(+) I'm such an old f--- that I predate the advent of required fully-enclosed PTO shafts, chain shields were generally as minimal as possible and open platforms. One didn't expect the gear to look out for you; you knew to respect it and to be the cautious one yourself.
Now, things aren't the way they used to be and it does seem as I assist at Farm Bureau safety events for kids (they're required to have a course and certificate to work off their own farmstead now) that there isn't the awareness that we used to have and an expectation that somehow they should be protected against whatever happens instead of ensuring that something bad does _not_ happen. Equipment _is_ safer and that's _a_good_thing_ (tm) but expectations are so different in societal blame-shifting it shows up even at this. I do not think that is a good trend.
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On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 17:04:17 -0400, Robatoy

Any RAS other than a "professional" model is a waste of time and energy. A good one is (or can be) worth it's weight in gold.
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On 8/8/2011 8:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

Troo-dat... :)
--
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Like the 12 to 16-inchers at the lumber yard?
I wonder what this local (?) yard uses... http://www.jettoolumberyard.com /
-- I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues. --Duke Ellington
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On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 20:24:35 -0700, Larry Jaques

They don't have to be 12 or 16 inchers to be good, and by far not all 12 or 16 inchers ARE good. I've seen a lot of big crap over the years - and I've seen some beautiful, simple, crude, and accurate swinging cutoff saws at lumber yards that are certainly not "radial arm saws" that do that job just fine - but I wouldn't want to try to cut cove moulding with them.
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"Robatoy" wrote:

----------------------------- Even works well with an 18VDC panel saw.
Lew
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I am still quite fond of my Skil worm drive....although getting a tad heavier than I remember.
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I wrote:

----------------------------- "Robatoy" wrote:

-------------------------------------- After somebody decided they needed my Mag housing 77, more than I did, I ended up with an 18VDC DeWalt panel saw as part of a drill/saw package.
I won't go back.
Not having to screw around with a cord was reason enough.
After that, it's a matter of weight.
Lew
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snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net says...

Is easier with a Speed Square and a Skilsaw than with any stationary machine. If you need more precision you make a jig.
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Brilliant idea!!
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On 8/8/2011 5:18 PM, Robatoy wrote:

Ai't it. LOL.. I often use my jig saw and speed square, with the right Bosch blade I get burnished smooth cuts with little to no tear out.
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Those Bosch blades (the right one for the job) simply are the best.That's not to say that there aren't other good blades (Festool) but far be it for me to start a 'discussion' in here.
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On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 19:12:30 -0400, Robatoy

I borrowed one my clients' Bosch spade bits the other day when I couldn't find my set in my truck. Hayseuss Crisco, what a difference! I didn't know a spade bit could cut like that. Scary fast, smooth sides, super-aggressive feed. I'm completely sold.
Bosch Daredevil. Here's one source: http://www.toolking.com/bosch-dsb5003-daredevil-spade-bit-set-3-piece
-- I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues. --Duke Ellington
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"Leon" wrote:

--------------------------------- And here I thought I was the only one who pulled that trick.
Great minds run in the same gutter<G>
Lew
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On 8/8/2011 6:14 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Now there is two or more of us Lew. ;~)
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On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 18:18:52 -0400, Robatoy

I never, ever had any luck making a square cut on a vertical 4x4 until I learned the speed square method. Slap-in-the-head time.
Such a simple concept, such a rich reward!
-- I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues. --Duke Ellington
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On 8/8/2011 4:57 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

"A", sure...do 8 or 10 at a time and it's not as much of a slam dunk... :)
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Well, actually it is. 10 of them lined up on a 2x4 beats manhandling 10 of them into and out of the shop and onto and off of the saw.
In fact for 10 I'd probably clamp 'em together then use my sheet-goods jig.
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