Circular saw recommendations?

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On 8/6/11 2:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

They said "8-10 weeks" when I ordered mine and it showed up 3 days later. Two very big, heavy boxes.

I actually came up with a good idea for a brake on the sliding arm that would always be engaged and only disengage when the squeeze handle was pulled. There would be a ratcheting system that would not allow the blade assembly to move unless the trigger was pulled.
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Then I'll have to find a place to store 'em.

The other danger is the blade powering the carriage towards the operator. It seems that sort of thing could take care of that, too. With modern electronics such a thing would be trivial but I think the days of the RAS are over. I certainly wouldn't buy one now.
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On 8/6/2011 6:10 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

My current Searz RAS has a feature called "control cut". It's a motorized cable that only lets the motor advance at a controlled rate and retracts the motor when the trigger is released. It has a variable rate control thumb dial. Works great.
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wrote:

Ok, so someone stole my idea. ;-)
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Oh yea... sounds REAL safe. The motor retracts itself past the 'just cut' little pieces while the blade is still spinning down or even stopped? Can't you hear that wonderful sound of KAHcchAAANGGG when it jams a cut-off into the slot? What the hell, a new blade, maybe an eye, maybe a thumb....
RAS should be O U T L A W E D ! !
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On 8/7/2011 12:12 PM, Robatoy wrote: ...

More N O N S E N S E...
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"Robatoy" wrote:

--------------------------------------- You want an argument, change the subject.
Cerritos college has ONE (1) RAS in the entire facility.
It's use is restricted to cross cutting rough stock to length.
Even that cut gives me the "willies"
Lew
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On 8/7/2011 2:04 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

A RAS, and I owned one, is only tool that I always approached with a great deal of, if not exactly fear, trepidation. Finally got rid of because I was always looking for another way to do something instead of using it.
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Swingman wrote:

Nice overview of the RAS at the link below. Evidentally, it doesn't tell "the whole story" (I've never used one). It does say that those made after the early 60's were generally made to loose tolerances.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radial_arm_saw
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Why should it? I've never understood the antipathy that many guys here have toward radial arm saws. One person used to call them "radical harm saws" and I truly don't understand why. It's just a case of using the right tool for the right job. A radial arm saw is *not* the right tool for ripping (not the best one, anyway), but IMHO it's safer than a table saw for crosscuts:
- The stock stays put; you can even clamp it to the table if you want. There's *zero* possibility that a long board can torque crooked, bind, and kick back.
- Since the stock doesn't move, there's no kickback danger posed by cutting unsurfaced lumber that might rock or twist: shim it, clamp it, cut it.
- If a RAS ever *does* kick back, the wood is thrown *away* from the operator.
- The saw carriage runs on *rails*. Don't put your hand in line with the rails, and it's completely impossible to be hit by the blade.
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"Doug Miller" wrote in message - If a RAS ever *does* kick back, the wood is thrown *away* from the operator.
- The saw carriage runs on *rails*. Don't put your hand in line with the rails, and it's completely impossible to be hit by the blade.
============ Things bounce when forced to
Never say "never". People cut fingers off on presses that only travel a straight, repetitive line, unfortunately. Your turn to peel the potatoes!
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wrote:

I grew up around radial arm saws. I used them for many years. I did lots of work with dados and having to cut a lot of stock to length. It worked great for that. I have used mostly large, commercial 12 inch saws. At one time, every house construction project had a radial arm saw on site. I knew this guy who used to fabricate metal trailers which mounted a radial arm saw on it with a roof. He would just tow it to the site. He built about ten of them and rented them out.
I have done thousands of cuts on these saws over the years. I have all ten fingers and toes. Of course, I AM a safety freak. I never understood these irrational fear about these saws. There are an abundance of ways to injure yourself with power tools. People do it all the time. I just wonder what the safety practices are of those folks who fear these saws.
I will be the first to admit that there are more tool options available now that did not exist way back when. So the saw may not be as needed as it once was. And I know those old dewalts were a really good piece of equipment. Folks are buying those and restoring them. I don't have one now, not enough room. But when I get a bigger shop, I will be putting a RAS in. I am comfortable with it and I would use it regularly.
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"Lee Michaels" wrote in message
I grew up around radial arm saws. I used them for many years. I did lots of work with dados and having to cut a lot of stock to length. It worked great for that. I have used mostly large, commercial 12 inch saws. At one time, every house construction project had a radial arm saw on site. I knew this guy who used to fabricate metal trailers which mounted a radial arm saw on it with a roof. He would just tow it to the site. He built about ten of them and rented them out.
I have done thousands of cuts on these saws over the years. I have all ten fingers and toes. Of course, I AM a safety freak. I never understood these irrational fear about these saws. There are an abundance of ways to injure yourself with power tools. People do it all the time. I just wonder what the safety practices are of those folks who fear these saws.
I will be the first to admit that there are more tool options available now that did not exist way back when. So the saw may not be as needed as it once was. And I know those old dewalts were a really good piece of equipment. Folks are buying those and restoring them. I don't have one now, not enough room. But when I get a bigger shop, I will be putting a RAS in. I am comfortable with it and I would use it regularly.
==================== Never used a RAS but wonder how they compare with a good sliding miter saw. I couldn't live without one, even a cheap one. Advantages or disadvantages?
--
Eric


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13 1/2 inch crosscut. I finally built a crosscut jig to use with a circular saw.
Max
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If you are referring to a RAS capacity, I fail to see much difference. My $179 10" cuts a 2x12 (hundreds of them) and has a few more space to go. I would have actually check the throat capacity to be sure. I believe I have to do a flip over for 3/4" x 16" shelving to get the last 1"
---------------- "Max" wrote in message
13 1/2 inch crosscut. I finally built a crosscut jig to use with a circular saw. -------------------

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I bought my RAS in 1969. I wasn't aware of any sliding miter saws available at the time. Last year I replaced a Bosch 8" sliding miter saw with a Milwaukee 12". I still use the jig I built for crosscutting anything over a foot wide. If I happen to have the Festool TS75 out of its systainer I'll use it just for the dust collection. (and, of course, it'll be out of its systainer if I'm cutting panel goods) But I'm still not selling the RAS. ;-)
Max
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There are at least two things you can do with a RAS that you can't do with a SCMS:
Most radial arm saws allow the saw carriage to be turned at 90 degrees to the rails, and locked in place, so you can make rip cuts.
Radial arm saws also have long enough arbors to accomodate a dado set.
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Thanx! I forgot about the head turning 90 and using the RAS like an upside down shaper table. This must be what all the "jumping the board" an "ripping" discussion is all about.
------------------- "Doug Miller" wrote in message wrote:

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"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:
[snipped all be the important part.LOL]

There you have it. You HAVE to be 110% awake, NO routine cuts, perfect set-up and materials...
For a super careful, vigilant user, RAS's offer only a small set of advantages that simple aren't worth the danger.
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snipped-for-privacy@disneyland.burp says...

What's "the danger"?
On a table saw you move your fingers into the blade.
On an RAS you move the blade into your fingers.
Either way you have no fingers.
How is one "more dangerous" than the other?
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