Circular saw recommendations?

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I have the PC743 (blade left) which I've used the hell out of and it just keeps on ticking. I think it's been discontinued though. Seeing the blade and the cut line is nice but the sawdust that gets thrown in my face will make me opt for a blade right next time. Art
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On 8/4/2011 10:38 PM, Artemus wrote:

So you are right handed. ;~) Your left blade saw was originally intended for lefty's that did not want to have saw dust thrown in their face all the time.
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Yes, I'm a righty. At the time of purchase the "seeing the cut line" argument seemed rational. Now a track saw with a fully enclosed blade seems to be the rational choice for sheet goods. Art
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On 8/5/2011 2:48 PM, Artemus wrote:

Oh hell yeah! The track saw coupled with a vac means you have to look for saw dust after ripping a sheet of plywood. Not to mention you only align the saw up on top of the track, no guess work as to where the saw is going to cut once the track is placed.
It works good at turning s2s lumber into s2s1e also, faster than using a jointer on long pieces.
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On 8/5/2011 12:48 PM, Artemus wrote:

...it definitely is. That said, I still use my Skilsaw 77 quite a bit for heavy work in the field...just never needed anything else. The weight is helpful in many situations, power is spectacular, and I don't mind getting sawdust blown back in my face...or maybe I just haven't noticed...or I've put my face in the position necessary to avoid it. ;9
cg
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"Doug Miller" wrote:

----------------------------------- Got an 18VDC circular saw as part of a kit.
15 years and a couple of batteries later, that saw doesn't owe me anything.
Primary use was to break down sheet goods and trim 2x4s.
Built a boat with it.
I'll never have another corded saw.
Lew
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On 8/4/2011 11:14 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

How long did it take to build that boat Lew?
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"Leon" wrote:

------------------------- 18+ years to get the hull, deck, bulkheads and floors.
Still had another 5 years to trim out when I walked away.
Lew
http://sites.google.com/site/lewssailboat /
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On 8/5/2011 1:01 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Have seen the picture before and again, Lovely project Lew!
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How long would it have taken if you didn't have to wait for the batteries to charge? :)
--
Make it as simple as possible, but not simpler. (Albert Einstein)

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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On 8/4/2011 9:36 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

At one time PC had my eye but today If I were to buy another it would be the Makita. I own a few Bosch tools but have never been impressed enough to say I would buy them again, 2 routers and an impact driver. Milwaukee also had my attention long before complaints about a drop in quality. FWIW I am around construction sites on a pretty regular basis and the Makita seems to be the favorite.

IMHO cordless is going to be good if you have no plan to ever use the saw but it would be handy to have if that was all you had to make a cut. Not saying that it cannot perform a task but it is never ever going to be able to keep up with the cheapest of corded saws. I would never buy one unless I had a specific need that required a cordless saw.

It seems to be a forgotten thing but most saws have the blade on the right side and were intended to be held with a right handers right hand. Left sides saws were made available for the south paws. This all evolved around safety and where you should be standing when operating the saw. Typically the intent was that the saw body was between you and the blade. This position also helps to keep a large amount of saw dust from being thrown back at you. Safety aside the left sided models have become more popular with right handers because they can see the blade and the line they want to follow. That does not mean they are using the correct saw, just that they want to see the spinning blade while it is cutting. Every saw I have seen and or used has a cut line indicator on the front of the shoe to give you that information. Once you have used the saw enough and correctly and as you have indicated for you personally you become comfortable and proficient with using the indicator rather than watching the blade. I will never buy a left sides saw, I am right handed. There are exception's some saws only come with the left side blade, take the Skil 77 as an example.

Well look closely at your choices as many top brand tools are being manufactured in China these days.

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Doug Miller wrote the following:

I have never had a left hand bladed C saw. First, I didn't know they existed before some comments made in this, or some other home or construction group. I do have a very old Skilsaw wormdrive saw that belonged to my FiL, now deceased. The saw has been languishing in a dark corner of my garage for a decade. It has some missing parts related to safety and I never used it or even turned it on, besides, it is a monster and heavy. Looking at it just now, I see it is left bladed. I too am right handed, and I can see some benefit to having a saw with a left handed blade, especially the "gives users the clearest line of sight for easy, accurate cutting" part. Another I would think would be a safety issue. Holding a piece of wood steady, whether fenced or unfenced with the left hand, then cutting on the other side of the right hand bladed saw requires that your head is also on the right side of the saw to aim the cut leaving the left hand in your peripheral vision and could be in the way of the motor side as it saws. I like the idea that the holding, aiming, and cutting, is on the same side of the saw. I guess left handed people already are doing this with the right handed blade saws. Why are most, if not all, radial arm saws left bladed? Just my opinion, YMMV.
.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 8/5/2011 10:17 AM, willshak wrote:

It "sounds" logical and like a good idea, it is not. Most all power tools come with some kind of warning to not bend over or align you eyes directly with the cutting edge of the blade. bit, what ever. The "common" circular saw is not a precision tool. Although skilled and long time users can do wonders with circular saw it is a developed skill. The intent by the manufacturer is for you use the alignment mark at the front of the shoe to line up your saw and then start the saw and make the cut with your head and eyes on the opposite side of the blade. Yes your cut is probably not going to be square or a straight line. This is a free hand tool and practice makes perfect.
The RAS is a different set up altogether. While a circular saw's blade rotation directs the debris back behind the saw, in your direction, the RAS directs the debris away from the operator. Same with miter saws. That said when ripping with a RAS the debris comes back at the operator however the guard should be rotated down on the back side of the blade to divert the debris, and prevent kickback providing you are using the splitter and anti kick back pawls.

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The guard on my old (30 years) crapsman rotates to the front to hold down the board against kickback. The pawls and splitter rotate down from the rear of the guard. The guard doesn't do squat for flying sawdust.
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On 8/5/11 7:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Did you look into getting the free replacement table and guard?
http://www.radialarmsawrecall.com /
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-MIKE-

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Didn't know about the new guard and table. I'll look into it but how does a guard cover the entire blade? I knew about the $100 for the return of the motor but even though I haven't used the thing in 15 years, it's worth more to me than the $100. ;-)
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On 8/5/11 10:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

<
http://tedwiebe.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/dsc_00021.jpg
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-MIKE-

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Thanks, but it looks backwards. Doesn't the front-bottom of the guard catch on the wood/fence when it's pulled across it? It also looks like the hinges are backwards, or set up to cut on the push.
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On 8/5/11 11:43 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

No, it's doesn't catch. I guess if your fence is higher than normal, it may, but there's also a lift on the handle, to lift it for whatever reason, including that.
As for the hinges, remember that a RAS also rips. Most guys don't do this and think it's dangerous. I've ripped a lot with mine and it's no more dangerous than on a table saw, when done correctly.
FWIW, when end cutting narrow stock, I often pull the saw out, set my board, then cut on the push stroke to avoid that forward push sensation of a RAS. I also use a blade with a negative hook angle to lessen that.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Thnaks. I ordered the "kit" for my saw (113.19771). It implies that the "kit" contains a guard and table. The site said it would take 8-10 weeks to get here. Since it was some time before 1993 (we moved that year and I never put it back together) when I last used it, I think I can wait. ;-)

It's perfectly safe, when done correctly. ;-) I'm one of the "most guys", though I have ripped a *lot* with it, too. I didn't set it up after the move, primarily because I didn't like ripping on it. Not that I have a table saw, that's not an issue.

The issue I have is on the other side of the blade. With a TS my hands are never on the back side when power is on. I suppose one can do the same with a RAS, but it's awkward. OTOH, I never stood in the line of fire when using the RAS. With a TS it's a little more difficult to stand completely aside.
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