Circular saw recommendations


Okay, now I'm looking to buy a good circular saw. Last weekend, my old circular starting burping on me and it's barely worth its weight in scrap metal.
So ... I was looking at the Milwaukee 6390-21 Tilt-Lok handle model. That's running $130. Looks like more than I'll ever need.
Another one I'm looking at is the Bosch 1658B-01. One seller has it "new in box" for only $90. SOunds like a steal.
My other option is to buy a reconditioned Bosch CS20. That's running about $96.
Any opinions on these selections, or some other model? The $130 is pretty much the most I'd want to spend.
Thanks!
Jack
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Jack:
I really like the Skil worm drive saws. I had used several different circular saws in the past, including Milwaukee, Craftsman, and Porter Cable, but I would never go back to a "sidewinder" after using my Skil worm drive. The worm drives feel smoother and more stable to me, once you get used to the torque at startup which make the saw want to twist momentarily. The fact that the saw has two handles instead of one helps to keep things steady and straight on long panel cuts.
The only problem is that they may be outside your budget unless you buy reconditioned or used. I bought my first worm drive new several years ago for about $150.00, then picked up a second one at an auction for $8.00. The $8.00 saw works just as well as my first one, and I don't worry about knocking it around. I save the first one for cutting panels with an aluminum straightedge.
If you prefer the sidewinders, I would recommend the Porter Cable unit. I recommended this saw to my brother and to a friend at work, and neither one regrets the purchase.
Kevin
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It depends on two things: What you are going to use if for, and what you are comfortable with.
When I was framing houses many years ago, I used a sidewinder. I liked it a lot. However, some of the guys that came to work or sub from me used the worm drives. I didn't like them, but boy did I respect their power. They could take a blade that I took off my saw and use it for another week to burn the whole blade blue without choking down the saw.
I didn't like the worm drives because they were heavier, and all of them were left bladed, which meant the that saw sat on the piece that was going to fall off. Not a big deal with a wrap around table/shoe, but I like the saw to be on a surface as solid as possible when cutting.
I also couldn't use the worm drive on finish paneling and it was uncomfortable for long rips; I was unable to use my "finger rip guide" as I had to that point without scaring the crap out of myself. Nor was it as easy to use with my shop built rip guides to do finish ripping for cabinet shelves, etc. For ripping soffits, decking, siding, and just about all framing, it kicked ass.
That being said, if you buy a worm drive, you will never need to buy another circular saw in your life just to saw wood. Some may be better than others, but they are all tanks.
If you are going to use the saw around the house for building a deck, repairing fascia, putting in shelves, some light remodeling and for an occasional project, get a sidewinder. I personally didn't like the DeWalts or Porter Cables simply because they have grooved shoes. When trying a compound miter cut (think repairing the >>scribe<< cut fascia corner of square cut rafters or scribed paneling inside corner) if you catch the table on a splinter or knot in the grooves it will cause the saw to follow your the splinter and squirrel your cuts. You cannot follow the scribed line to the degree of accuracy I like.
I found the little Makita sidewinder and it is a good all around saw, but light on power. Talking to some of my guys a couple of years ago they pointed out to me that Makita also made that saw in a heavier version with better controls and better feel, plus it now had a 15 amp motor. I bought it, and I am happy with it and use it all the time, while the other saws I bought have become "crew saws".
I grew up in the trades using Milwaukee, Rockwell, and Millers Falls saws, so all the newer offerings look weak to me. I have an old Milwaukee that I used for about 15 years almost every day, and rebuilt that bad boy 5 -6 times with new bearings, trigger and cord. It is now cheaper to just buy a new saw, most of which to me are glorified throw aways.
Most of the brands mentioned here and the ones that will be mentined as favorites are probably all good saws, so you will probably be fine with whichever fits your hand the best.
My .02. As always, YMMV.
Robert
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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

I have this saw. It replaced a B&D that fell off the ladder one too many times. Although I've had it over a year, I'v only used it a half dozen times at most. No complaints. I like the tilt lock because I SEEM TO CUT STRAIGHTER when the handle is low.
Good luck with your quest,
Bill Leonhardt
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