Circular saw recommendations

I decided that it's time to replace my old low end Skil circular saw and I was looking for recommendations. The models that appear to be in the running are: Milwaukee 6390-21, Porter Cable 324 or the DeWalt 369 CSK. Any and all recommendations and anecdotes appreciated. Also, I am right handed and have been using a right handed saw for over 25 years. Any thoughts on switching over to a left handed model would be useful.
Larry
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"Larry Wolfrum" writes:

<snip>
If you are a framing contractor, tough to beat the 77.
If not, consider one of the battery powered panel saws.
Had my 77 stolen, on a lark, replaced it with an 18 VDC DeWalt panel saw.
I've never looked back.
HTH
Lew
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I am right-handed and use the lefty PC (I think the model is 734).
I'm not a bit cirular saw user (at least wasn't until I built my addition). I really like the lefty, but then I did not have to undo 25 years of training. My brother in law has the same saw, but the righty one.
He was well-indoctrinated into right-handed-saws. I think using mine bugged him a bit.
With a lefty you can see the cut much more clearly because the motor is out of the way. The tradeoff is the the motor is over the waste side of the cut, so you have to "hold" the saw in balance as you complete a cut.
The PC is also lighter than most of the saws in that range (probably 1 less amp and 1.5 fewer lbs, a trade-off that suits me just fine).
Cheers,
Steve

Milwaukee
model
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addition).
bugged
out
cut,
See, you're still fighting the right blade thinking. I love my PC lefty, but I'm still learning to think left handed. Plan your cut from the other end of the board so you're holding the cut-off in your left hand, and the saw is still on the part supported by the saw horses.
--
Nahmie
Those on the cutting edge bleed a lot.
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Hands down look at Bosch. Nothing else even comes close.

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Look at Festool. I recently bought one and it's really a table saw in a box. With the guide rails that come with it (well you have to pay for them) I regularly use it for things I used to do on the table saw.
I used to have a DeWalt (stolen) and a Bosch (left in Europe because 22 Volt), but the Festool wins by a big margin.
It *is* pricey though.
<http://tinyurl.com/6wozh
If you use your saw for framing on a building site I'd go for a cheaper 'ordinairy' one. But since this is a woodworking newsgroup...
--
mare

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On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 10:10:37 -0500, mare*Remove*All*0f*This*I*Hate*Spammers*@mac.invalid.com (mare) wrote:

I did a rough calculation and came up with $900+ , and that doesn't include a good-sized table & sacrificial overlay. I'm still thinking of doing it, but I'm also wondering whether I couldn't build a usable panel frame with saw for less than that.
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wrote:
I bought a Bosch since I had other tools by them. Got home had no power cord. They had no more units in stock, bought a PC been very happy.
Don

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The new Bosch doesn't come with a power cord, it's made to plug an extention cord directly into the saw! --dave

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I was waiting for someone to ask if he had bought the battery powered model.

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I've owned the DW 368K for several years. It's the same saw as the 369 except the 369 has a composite shoe. I've also used the PC, it to is a fine saw. No experience with the Milwaukee. I chose the DW over the PC because i don't like the where the tube that discharges the sawdust is located. Sometimes when cutting, the sawdust exiting the PC through the tube seems to get blown back into my face more than on the rear discharge DW, especially on a windy day. Although either saw will serve you well and both are a good choice IMHO. --dave

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I believe I would finish out my carpentry career using a coping saw before I would buy another DeWalt.
--
Surely, maturity will guide one to understand
the absence of a response to personal attacks.
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December issue of Fine Homebuilding just had a review of circ saws. Perhaps it might help your decision.
BTW, have a bosch cs20. really nice saw.

Milwaukee
model
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On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 05:33:14 GMT, "Larry Wolfrum"

There's hardly anything Milwaukee that's bad. Porter-Cable circular saws are good, too, although I can't speak to their most recent models.
What kind of sawing are you going to do? If heavy duty, day in/day out framing, then you'll definitely want a 7" saw. But if you're looking at less duty, around the shop, for example, the P-C 345 SawBoss is a delight (left hand blade--see discussion below). It's only limitation is the 6" blades can be harder to find as they aren't stocked everywhere like 7" blades are.
Left vs right. If you're cutting framing and you're right handed, stick to the right hand blade, like you've been doing. The saw sits on the work while the cutoff falls away. If you're cutting sheet goods (and you're right handed), it definitely is handier to have the sight line in front of you. If you're left handed, reverse the above.
If you're cutting a lot of sheet goods on a job, you'll definitely want to think worm drive, but if you're in this category, a worm drive is probably only one of the two or three saws you'll want.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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Far more expensive, but also far superior is the Festool. I don't have one, but I've used it. It's probably twice the price of any other; it's also more than twice the quality.
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This year I replaced my old Craftsman circular saw with a DW364. I wanted something with a larger shoe plate for use with a clamp-on guide.
I looked at the various manufacturers, and choose the DeWalt DW364, even though I normally buy Bosch tools.
I am also a lefty, but prefer to have the cutting edge in my view and so did not want a "left hand" saw.
I was also looking for a saw with an electronic brake.
I have been very happy with the DW364. Lots of power, seems to be well constructed. I like the shoe pivot design which has a depth-of-cut scale. Saves time in measuring depth of cut.
Dave Paine.

Milwaukee
model
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Any thoughts on switching over to a left handed model

Yeah, don't unless you are going to be using your left hand to cut material. The whole idea of having the left hand model if for left handed use. You will end up with more saw dust in your face if using a left hand model right handed. The left handed people had this problem using right handed saws.
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Hi, I'd have to go find a catalog to figure out what the current Dewalt equivalent is, but I really like my Black & Decker Super Saw Cat. As far as I know, it is the only saw family with a rear pivot depth adjustment. I personally like it a lot better than the more common front pivot.
Mill

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On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 22:33:14 -0700, Larry Wolfrum wrote

I've owned the Milwaukee for about 5 years (replaced a B&D POS). The difference between a cheap saw and a good saw is amazing! You can't go wrong just by upgrading.
I've only done a small amount of framing, most of the cutting has been panel stock so I have never used the "tilt" feature of the saw. The grip is perfect for my hand and the adjustment levers are easy to use and snug. I have found no faults.
-Bruce
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