circular saw blade for plywood

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Hello
What do you guys use for a plywood blade in your circular saw? I bought a plywood blade to cut some birch plywood and it did a terrible job with tearout.
I have a bunch of bookcases to make so I would like to improve the initial cuts.
Thanks
Larry C
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Larry C wrote:

You talking a handheld or contractor/table saw?
I've had good luck w/ good quality plywood blades; don't understand there being much of a problem unless it was just an inexpensive one or some other alignment problem.
--
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It is a circular saw
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Larry C wrote:

gosh, don't overwhelm us w/ verbiage...
What _specific_ blade (manufacturer, no teeth, grind, etc., etc., ...)
I'll take the "circular saw" as skilsaw, not contractors; they all are "circular".
What particular saw and are you sure the blade is perpendicular to the shoe plate and are you using a guide or freehanding the cuts? Have you checked the blade is parallel to the edge of the base plate if using the straightedge? If it isn't, it's just like the fence on a tablesaw not being parallel to the blade; it causes the work to run at an angle against the blade which will cause teeth to drag on one edge or the other preferentially depending on which way the bias is.
--
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I was trying to do about ten things when I was tanking about this question and I just replied.
I use a Milwaukee Skill saw and the blade is a 140 tooth. I use a straight edge as a guide.
I will read the link that someone posted and see if that helps
Thanks
Larry C
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I use a Skill Worm drive with diamond hole blades.
The whole trick I think is a thin tooth and sharp. I use carbide. Carbide stands up better than standard steel. Martin
Larry C wrote:

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This url will take you to a google books extract, which has some information on cutting ply with a circular saw and ways to minimise tearout.
Scroll down past the two pics to get to the explanatory text.
Hope this helps
http://tinyurl.com/y8hruqj
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I've been using an Oldham "Ultra Finishing/Plywood/OSB Industrial Carbide" blade in a cheap Black and Decker hand-held circular saw. 7-1/4", 60 tooth blade.
Makes CLEAN, FINE cuts on the 3/4" expensive cherry-faced plywood I've used.
I put the "good side" down, and use a clamped-on fence to guide the hand-held saw.
Works like a charm for me.
-Zz
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Larry C wrote:

As a last resort, you can clamp some sacrificial wood to both sides of your stock.
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I use this blade: http://tinyurl.com/y9yssn6 on a Milwaukee 6390-21 http://tinyurl.com/y8dr249
"good" side down, and I use a 9' straight edge as a guide.
Max
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Here is what you need
http://www.festoolusa.com/products/plunge-cut-circular-saws/ts-55-eq-plunge-cut-circular-saw-561174.html
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I bought an Irwin Marathon blade at my grandpa's suggestion, and it's yet to come off the circular saw. It's a standard blade (I don't remember the number of teeth for 7 1/4" blades), not a plywood blade, but if you take it easy it cuts through plywood with a minimal amount of tearout. Last plywood I cut with it was sheathing grade 1/2" stuff, though. You may have problems with better quality plywood.
Not bad for a $8 blade.
Puckdropper
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Larry C wrote:

Your biggest problem will be with crosscuts, any decent blade should rip well. For crosscuts, you could...
1. Use a blade with many tiny teeth. Expensive if carbide, cheap if steel and steel works well for a while.
2. Apply backer to tearout side. Even masking tape helps.
3. Moisten the wood.
4. Score the wood on tearout side with a knife. Hard to do with a hand held saw. Scoring can also be done by making a very shallow first cut then cutting through.
5. Cut a bit oversize and trim with a router.
--

dadiOH
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TWO WORDS:
Masking Tape
Some more words . . .
Good quality, thin kerf, carbide blade with as many teeth as you can find.
I bought a "plywood" blade from Lowes, found it less than perfect and took it back for a refund. Bought a thin kerf carbide blade and had better results. Also, there is something about which side is "up" that is different (as I recall) when using a "Skill" saw vs a table saw. I believe the god side is to be down with the former.
Google "Cutting Plywood" don't take my word for it! :)
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*snip*

The blade makes contact with the good side first.
(Of course, you'll want to take more protections to protect the "god side.")
Puckdropper
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reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Actually the blade makes contact with the top side first. You however want the good side down.
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You're right (of course). I might have over simplified things.
In the middle of a cut, for any given tooth, the good side is the one that the cutting edge of the tooth comes in to contact with first.
I think this is general enough and correct enough to work for any saw.
Puckdropper
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Hoosierpopi wrote: ...

Yes, the cutting teeth edge enter from the bottom for the skilsaw while from the top on a table saw. Hence, there tends to be less tearout when oriented as stated although a quality, sharp blade should leave minimal either way...but as noted much earlier in the thread (before OP departed, in fact :) ) it was noted an alignment of the blade can cause problems if the trailing drag the cut edge on exit they can wreak havoc (as well as can the cutting teeth on exit, particularly that's where dull or poor set or choice of type of blade will cause problems).
--
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Guys
Thanks for all of the suggestions. I think my issue is most likely my blade.
Sorry about the initial post being somewhat vague. A little spun in circles these days.
Plus I forgot that Verizon was dumping news groups and sign up to service to reply to this thread.
Larry C
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