Circle Support

I'm trying to support a couple loops of track with a circle under the track. These loops are used temporarily for testing, and stored up against the wall. The circles would be approximately 18" radius but open in the center to save on materials and weight. To do this, I plan on cutting straight segments with the appropriate angle to approximate the circle.
However, it seems that all the joints on these segments would lead to a rather flexible circle, so I'm looking at my options to stiffen the circle. The two I've come up with thus far are cutting twice or three times the segments required and overlapping the joints (basically building my own plywood) or using some kind of bolt and nut system to keep the joints together.
Are there better options?
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 1/1/2012 1:41 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Biscuits!
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knuttle wrote:

If your circles don't have to be the same radius, you could cut several from a half a sheet of plywood, each with a 3 inch, or so, width for the track (think of the circles as nested within each other). I started off thinking of framing, but maybe what I've described may lie more-level than some of your other options. Hope my comment might be of use.
Bill
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On 1/1/2012 6:57 AM, knuttle wrote:

[snip]
Puckdropper ook the words right out of my mouth. An 36" diameter circle properly glued up with biscuits should do the trick for your purposes.
If you find that there is still a bit too much flex (doubt it will be the case but then we don't know what you will be doing with it during the "temporary testing) you could fashion a cross piece (think four spokes) by making a cross with a half-lap joint in the center and and a half lap at each of the four ends onto which your circle would be glued/screwed. If THAT isn't solid enough, you're using the wrong material - get some structural steel<g>
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I don't have a biscuit joiner, so I'll either have to buy one or use a different method.
I don't need a ton of strength, but do need enough rigidity to keep things from flexing. For testing, the track is simply placed on the floor, so there's no concern there. It's the storage that concerns me, as track that's free to flex will loosen connections.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 1/2/2012 12:11 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Well, as Artemus suggested, perhaps pocket screws would work.
Now that I understand a bit better exactly what you're trying to do, how about this?
No biscuit cutter but I presume you have a table saw? Cut your segments and then center a cut on the end of each segment and run it through (using a jig) like you were cutting tenons, only just make a pass (or possibly two) on the center of each end. Make up some splines and glue it all together. All you're trying to do here is get away from end gluing so you can increase the strength of the joint. Spline joints will do that quite well for your purpose.
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On 1/2/2012 10:47 AM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

I mentioned biscuits, but I was not thinking biscuit cutter. With all of the segments that you have to put together, I would use what I use for picture frames.
I have a slot cutter for my router. With the router mounted in a table, and fences, you can cut a dozen biscuits slots in a couple of minutes.
Set up is simple. Adjust the height of the bit, then position the fences; one to position the slot on the piece, and the second in front of the piece, then cut the slots first from the right side of the bit and then from the left side of the bit.
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On 1/2/2012 9:58 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

That was kind of my point and pretty much what we've seen as this thread runs its course. Increase the gluing surface to stabilize that joint.
Lotsa ways to skin a cat but when you get right down to it, the cat is dead and there are just various ways to reach that point.
Splines have been around "forever." Biscuit cutters for what? Maybe 25 years or so in general use. Craftsmen have used splines a lot longer. Use a gun, knife, poison or your bare hands, just kill the damn cat!<g>
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The splines look like they'd work nicely. They'd keep things from moving, and wouldn't be all that difficult to make.
Thanks to everyone for the suggestions.
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On Sun, 01 Jan 2012 07:57:43 -0500, knuttle

Nah! It's the dawn of a new year. He should buy himself a Festool Domino. Either that or borrow Leon's Domino. I'm sure he'd be willing to ship it cross country to help out a fellow woodworker.
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Pocket screws. Art
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