Chopping block losing glue.

My Martha Stewart Hardwood Chopping Block (with four rubber feet) splits in two after we left it in the rain. Here's how it begins. Over time, the glues near the edges dry up creating gaps along the edges, much like pine cones splitting under heat. The chopping block then begins to show signs of splitting which eventually breaks in half under a heavy storm.
I drill and insert several wooden dowel pins up and down the block. I then join both halves together. I use no glue or preserving oil because I couldn't find any food-grade glues or oils. I can see that it's a matter of time before it breaks again, but elsewhere. What is a practical way to keep a chopping block from splitting?
Thanks
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white mineral oil.
randy

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Must be a darn nice chopping block to be worth that much trouble. And what does breaking in half heavy a heavy storm mean? Well, I will give you the benefit of the doubt.
I can't imagine why you left it in the rain, but chopping blocks should use waterproof glue. If it split, it is defective. Take it back. If it is MS, KMart can hardly doubt you bought it there.
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We just left it on a deck of a boat, like most fisherman do. A nasty weather crumbles it under its own weight. Saw one for $90, I wonder if this one will last. I will coat it with white mineral oil or EV olive oil.

Aren't chopping blocks water-proof? Aren't they meant for UV-lights, salts, vibrations or normal fisherman abuses? And you say it isn't suppose break, even left out on a boat?
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Chopping blocks(butcher blocks) were never meant to be left outdoors in the weather.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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Tim Zimmerman wrote:

Don't soak it. Mineral oil is nice for cutting boards, but I would not try to "load" it, only a surface coating. Leaving the board in the rain may have warped the wood to the extent that it will not glue together again without shaping the sides that should fit together. Wood glue or contact cement should work. When I clean wood cutting boards, I use a 3M scrubber with hot soapy water, scrub right away, rinse with cool water and stand it in the sink to dry.
I would not use it if there are gaps between the blocks of wood, as they can trap food and bacteria.
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Chopping blocks were traditionally made with end grain blocks and held together with an outside frame, no glue being used, i think birch was the wood of choice. Cleaning was a good scrubbing with salt, no matter the gaps. What we have now is cheap mass produced items not deserving to be called chopping blocks. YPFWYG
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Take care of it. Don't leave it in the rain...

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On Fri, 18 Feb 2005 07:07:04 +0000, Tim Zimmerman wrote:

I turned my split k-mart MSHCB into a number of shop jigs, fixtures, and tool handles. I then went to Williams Sonoma and got a real one for the kitchen.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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Tim Said:
<Snips her and there)

Fix your roof!
Dave
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Tim Zimmerman wrote:

*snip*
Well, if you're going to leave it outside in the rain, I'd say go with something like Thompson's water sealer or a similar product if you want to keep a natural finish. Otherwise, a good coat of paint will do the trick. Not sure about using it for food after that, but I probably wouldn't chop up anything for the dinner table on a board I kept outside anyway so that wouldn't be an issue from my perspective.
Doubt it is somehow defective as some have mentioned. I would imagine any piece of wood furniture is going to split and crack if you leave it outside unprotected from the elements. That kind of use is well outside the scope of what the manufacturer intended and it seems kind of unethical to return it as somehow defective.
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Titebond II is food safe once cured
Water intrusion is the bane of any glue up. The expansion is stronger than most any mechanical or adhesive conection can bear. Leave you dining room table out in the rain and see what happens.
You need to keep it oiled with mineral oil. If you can't find it at a culinary shop then the pharmacy should have it, it's a wonderful stool softner and isn't bad over ice cream ;^)
You can disenfect your cutting board with a warm water and vinegar mixture.
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if left in the weather it will split - end of story - end of chopping block - extra virgin olive oil can be used to seal it.
Steve - Australia, land of sun

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On Sat, 19 Feb 2005 08:18:31 +1100, mindesign wrote:

Extra virgin will go rancid. (DAMHIKT) If you're going to use olive oil (which I do, or canola, whichever is handy), use "pure" olive oil which is much more refined.
--
Luigi
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Each time you chop on the block, you chop off the glue. It goes into your food.
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First you need to glue it. Aliphatic glue will be fine. Don't worry about the food issue. What do you think it was glued with to begin with?
Next the glue isn't drying near the edges, the wood is shrinking at the edges faster than the center. So it pulls away from each other. Don't leave it out in the rain. Blocks are meant for wet, but not soaking use. Doweling it will help, but glue the dowels.
Use mineral oil to protect the wood all around. The top will wear but the sides will appreciate it. A single coating will do.
BTW someone mentioned that the blocks were originally made with frames. Maybe some, but some of the professional versions I had seen 30 and 40 years ago where just big solid chunks of end grain glued together. No frames.. Would love to have one of those monsters today...
Tim Zimmerman wrote:

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I have seen some of those edge grain monsters that were 12 inches thick and the individual planks were dovetailed side by side. Every board had a dovetail on all 4 sides. max

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