choosing a miter saw:

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I noted that the DW703, which was in the general price range <$200 of the others doesn't have a laser. Others that do being Ryobi 10" $149, Ridgid 10" $177, Porter Cable 10" $199 and several Craftsman's $200 & under, incl their newest dual laser 21254 with legs & support for long pieces. Unknown if its adjustable but I'd sure hope so. The only DW I noted w/ laser was a 121" and it ran a bit over $500. My use is light duty hobby stuff. No professional work or day in & out usage. Window trim, some bookcases etc. Guess I'll continue to look at features and make selection within a month max. John
Bob G. wrote:

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About Dewalt and Black and Decker: a few years ago B&D ran into a lot of bad press (justly deserved) and, needing a good name, went out and bought DW. Beyond that, B&D is D-I-Y level and DW is professional.
When looking at Craftsman, one can never really tell who made it for all the best names have taken turns - Bosch, P-C, DW, Ryobi. They just made the stuff to Sears' specs.
I have a whole slew of Craftsman tools (all pro level) and haven't been happier. I even added in DW and P-C when I deemed their tool to be better. I even have a 40 year old heavier than lead B&D belt sander which I wouldn't trade for anything.
For compound miter saws - if you do not want a slider, 10 inch is probably better. The big deal with these saws is length of bed and height of back. Higher and wider is better. Of prime importance is positive stops with no slop when engaged.
If ever a slider is considered, a little less saw can be tolerated as the slide makes up for the difference in blade size. Of prime importance is the slide mechanism as a single slide bar allows for too much play resulting in sloppy cuts. 2 bar sliders are best.
No matter what is chosen, a motor mounted on top of the blade is better as the blade can tip further than one mounted on the side, and the back does not need to be cut to allow the motor to dip. --
PDQ --
| | >Hi,All: | >I am debating the following 3 model's, | > | > | > Ryobi 12 In. Compound laser miter saw Model TS1551DXL ($199) | > | > DeWalt 12 In. Compound Miter Saw Model DW705S ($299) | > | > RIDGID 12 In. Compound Miter Saw Model MS1250LZ ($299) | > | >would anyone please give me some suggestions? looks like the Ryobi got | >the laser, it that very important? | >Thanks in advance. | >John |
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On 24 Nov 2004 12:04:43 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (John) wrote:

I bought the DeWalt. If you buy one now, you can send away for a "free" $50 coupon that you can use to buy other stuff, so it's sort of a discount. One reason I like the DeWalt (that other people didn't mention) is that it is lighter than other models I looked at.
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I am looking for a good miter saw. I was told by HD that i shouldn' think of Ryobi as their not accurate with the cuts. is this true? I' just starting a business and can't waste or invest so much right awa on a more "accurate" saw so the Ryobi's seemed a goo choice. What do you all think? yeah the laser is only good when up the dust bag sucks but what about the angles? is the 22.5 degree cu i want going to be that or -+ a bit? with what i do, a bit is a whol lot
I will be using it to cut and frame crown moulding on top and botto
areas of these http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/Terra5Designs/Magnito69_Arachnovariums.jp
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as well as larger ticket items like this: [img:ecf4d82ede]
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v425/Terra5Designs/Slant_Front_Vivarium.gif[/img:ecf4d82ede
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to that, a client will look close and if the angles aren't on th
money, meaning a 45 isn't a 45 but a 46 or on a hex, if the 22.5 i more like a 23 then it's not going to sell. will this saw help ge the ball roling good enought or is the gauge off like HD says
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:wumpscut: wrote:

Yes
It's not.

The angles most likely will be off a lot more than a bit.

You'll probably end up using it as a boat anchor. In my opinion there is too much slop in Ryobi's saws to make them useful for anything other than framing.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
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no(SPAM)vasys wrote:
> > You'll probably end up using it as a boat anchor.
Spoken like a true landlubber<G>
Lew
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Hi,
As far as precision is concerned on a mitersaw, you better make sure you tune it well and only good quality saws can be tuned properly and remained precise for a while. Cheap ones are almost impossible to set within fractions of 1 degree.
If you're looking for dead-on precision all the time, the mitersaw is not the right tool. Get yourself a tablesaw with a sled. That's almost the only way to make sure you're not gonna waste wood. If you've never seen one, basically, it's something like this: http://www.rd.com/content/openContent.do?contentId 191
But you also raised the question of budget... A table saw, even a cheap one cost a little more than a good mitersaw so you may have to revise your initial investment on the up side.
Hope this helps.
Greg D.
On Wed, 09 Aug 2006 06:35:27 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@spam.invalid (:wumpscut:) wrote:

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Greg D. wrote:

www.ctdsaw.com
JP
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I won't hire you If you are willing to compromise on a cheap saw, I don't trust you to do good work. If you can't waste money, then you MUST invest in a good tool. If the miter saw is an important part of your business and you can't afford a $300 DeWalt over the $99 Ryobi, you are seriously underfunded and won't be in business long. Go to work for someone else and save up another $2500 or so before you think about going on your own. $10k would be better.
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Makita, Bosch, and DeWalt are good choices for a chop saw. Ryobi is good for a belt sander where precision is not required. You will probably want to make or buy a portable miter saw station with a stop so you can duplicate cuts quickly and easily. Fussing with a saw is not something you want to do when time is important.
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