Choosing a grinder

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wrote:

That's normal with all abrasives. The high points break off, making fast cutting stones (or paper) cut slower -- but smoother. "Broken in" stones are better for polishing tool backs, since they don't leave deep, ugly scratches.
If had no stones, I'd go with SiC paper. Grit seems more uniform than even monocrystalline diamond. New 600 wet-dry won't wreck a smoother iron like new 600 diamond will.
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snipped-for-privacy@cam.cornell.edu wrote:

You might consider a 1 inch belt sander...I have a 1" by 30" but think the 1" by 42" would have been better.....assortment of grits(120-320) and chisel nicks are simply a non issue. They run reasonably cool, at least mine is fairly light so stowing and retrieving is a non issue. The stock guide or tool rest platform probably won't provide appropriate angles but aftermarket or homemade will suffice. Works well on knife blades as well, better than anything else I have tried and seems to be the professional knife sharpeners choice.....Tage Frid simply recommends a portable belt sander mounted in a vice for quick nick removal (120 and above grit). Rod
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As always it depends ... Primarily on what you are going to be sharpening.
For me that's chisels and plane blades and I've settled on a slow speed 8" grinder with white (vitrified) wheels and a Veritas tool rest. Both are mounted on a piece of plywood and is easily switched between the benchtop and storage.
I got this grinder on sale for $75 http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyidF05
I got the tool rest on sale too but don't remember how much I paid. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p2975&cat=1,43072,45938
For honing I use scary sharp. Art
[snip]

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snipped-for-privacy@cam.cornell.edu wrote:

Hi Adrian,
I've been in that place too, and it's not fun. I ended up using coarse sandpaper to take a nick out of a plane iron once, and vowed never again.
I don't have a lot of space either, but I suspect I have a bit more than you. Regardless of space, I felt I couldn't go any longer without a powered grinder. So I'm following this guy's plans for a sharpening setup. It's likely more space than you think you can afford but I think it's likely a good way to go.
Keep in mind that he's a turner, and his requirements are different from yours. So you may be able to save some space by dedicating your setup only to chisels and plane irons.
http://aroundthewoods.com/sharpening01.html
--
Tanus

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I have a Tormek which had to be stored when not in use at my last shop and it was easy to pick up and place on the shelf. I got a little spillage from the water tray when moving but it never caused a problem. I think I read somewhere that Tormek is offering free grinding wheels for life now. I also like the fact that it makes it easy to sharpen most things around the house including scissors, knives etc.
The new shop will have a sharpening station of some sort and the Tormek will be center stage.
I had one of my employees come by the house last weekend and insulate the shop. Huge difference the R-19 makes. Monday morning it was in the low 40's outside and it was in the high 50's inside the shop with no heater.
Good luck in you decision.
cm
www.vintagetrailersforsale.com

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On Fri, 4 Jan 2008 06:42:18 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@cam.cornell.edu"

Hard to believe anyone taking more than a few minutes to sharpen a chisel. You can always use a belt sander, then follow up with a wet-stone sharpener or just a simple Arkansas wet stone. Bench grinders can burn a chisel unless you have a light touch. I found that no single sharpening tool (nor skill) does the job. Buy a good sharpening book (Lee wrote a very good one).
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Grinders are great for taking out big nicks and deep scratches. I don't generally like them for other sharpening chores (except maybe for shovels and spades). But you're right, IMO: taking mroe than a few minutes to sharpen any chisel is a waste of woodworking time. Making a fetish out of sharpening is something that a very, very few professionals and a great many amateurs seem to do.
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On Sat, 5 Jan 2008 07:21:07 -0800 (PST), Charlie Self

I can grind out a serious nick on the Tormek, and finish on 4000 and 8000 grit waterstones in well under a minute. On lots of hand tools, I skip the 4000/8000, and simply use the Tormek strop. The 4000/8000 stones then get used at the bench for touch ups.
What is it that makes you guys think all of this takes massive amounts of time? <G>
I still like my DMT plates for back flattening, but the Tormek really works for lots of us. I have a Baldor 1800 rpm grinder with good wheels, waterstones, the works! I'm one of those folks who sells off tools that don't pay off, and used Tormeks sell very well.
I _use_ the thing a lot, a _real_ lot! <G>
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